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10

I bought a pro-sumer wifi unit for about $300 on Amazon (Amplifi is the brand and came with 2 repeaters). It's low configuration and self-meshes with repeaters for total coverage. It's overkill for a lot of houses but I have an odd setup and it should cover virtually any house. I offer it here for comparison to the $200 "pro setup wifi". 1000ft of Cat6 is ...


6

Get a UPS No, not that UPS. An uninterruptible power supply, also known as a battery backup. This is a box that takes normal AC (e.g., 110-120V in the US) and uses it to charge a battery and power your devices. If power goes out (technically: voltage out of range) then it uses an inverter to power your devices from the battery. All automatically. You ...


5

The simplest way is to install blanks into the unneeded openings, they are commercially available:


4

Get a switch plate that has 2 blank spaces in it, like this one (link for illustration only, not a recommendation):


4

Um, I don't know where you got the term "power stealing". What you describe as that, is exactly the normal way to do that thing, and the right way... unless you are aware of some capacity issue on the transformer (as is sometimes seen in transformer-relay combos). As far as the R and C terminals, any HVAC transformer has two pins on the 24V side... They ...


4

The problem you have is that your current switch is wired as a switch loop. This means that a hot lead comes into the switch box and a switched hot lead leaves the box. There is no neutral wire in a true switch loop. Commonly a white wire is used for the line to the switch, but it is supposed to be marked with black tape or a marker to indicate it is hot. ...


4

Don't downgrade to a plastic box. Metal boxes are better and what's more, they are often essential in distributing grounding to other boxes. Further in some cities (e.g. Chicago) they are required by Code. The purpose of a box is to provide grounding and fire protection, and metal boxes do that better than plastic ones in all respects. Plastic boxes ...


4

That is correct. In the mains power world, we have 3 wires. EQUIPMENT SAFETY GROUND/EARTH which is not used for anything ever (except during a fault condition, of course)... HOT which is what humans consider the "source" of power... and NEUTRAL which is what humans consider the "power return". Obviously, it's AC, which makes "source" vs "return" ...


4

Because unlike a normal switch, the wifi switch needs power, so it needs a neutral wire to complete a circuit at the switch between the unswitched hot wire and neutral for that power. The neutral wire to the switch cannot be a light-gauge wire (at least if you are in an area subject to NEC codes; likely similar elsewhere in the world) because codes are ...


3

The garage door needs safety switches, as well as a reversing switch, a switch to detect end of travel (limit switch) and a switch to detect that correct force has been applied to keep the door closed. Simply turning the power to the whole door-opener on and off does nothing. If you want to use the Gosund outlet to bypass the remote control terminals, you'...


3

Tungsten loads have inrush issues resistive loads don't Tungsten (incandescent/filament) light bulbs have a positive temperature coefficient of resistance. This means that as the bulb heats up during operation, its resistance increases, and thus the current drawn by the bulb decreases. This inrush current when turning on a cold bulb can be a significant ...


3

You should be able to access it over WiFi, and most require you to set them up via a local network. To disable internet viewing, you simply block the IP from outside access (use a static IP for the CCTV). Your system you purchase should have instructions for that. – Jeff Cates 2 days ago


3

I would suggest you go for the conduit option suggested by others and negotiate on it with the builder. Go price the conduit and boxes for yourself so you can reliably say "materials for what I want are approximately $x" and then discuss how much you are willing to pay for install. One thing I haven't seen in the other answers is any real discussion on ...


3

Look for the junction of brown wires and attach your C wire to that On the wiring diagram for your furnace, the brown wires are all C wires, and they come together at a junction that should be somewhere near where the mains wires come in. Connect your C wire (which can be any unused wire in the thermostat cable) to that junction, perhaps with a length of ...


3

The adapters that you purchased should be unaffected by the so called "cheaters". Power strips and surge protectors include basic electronic components that can cause noise or other interference to the powerline adapters, but the basic two-prong adapter is just a few sicks of metal. Also, the adapters you chose use the "AV1000" standard. That, along with ...


2

There are a few issues you will have to overcome here, and most are solved much more easily by running cable. Solar power has limitations. For example, in Scotland I would need a pretty big solar panel to power the camera, wireless router, and charge a battery (for night time) and for many days of the year I wouldn't be able to get any charge (sunshine at ...


2

First step is to get an 802.11ac router. You're probably going to want wireless anyway, so just do that now. Live with that until you decide either you are happy with it, or you need to upgrade. And remember: you won't get ac speeds unless both the router and your device are ac. If you do need upgrade to wired, buy 2-4 small gigabit switches. Terminate all ...


2

Had the same issue with the Carrier thermostat shown in the picture. Exact same symptoms - connected to the home network, but would not stay connected to the Carrier network, could not link to weather forecasts, etc. However, had an older Carrier thermostat upstairs (on the same network) and it was working fine. Noted that the DNS settings on the ...


2

For a cheap and dirty solution, you can get a light bulb socket that contains a power outlet, e.g., here. If the camera uses a USB for power, you could try this DIY solution. If you want it neat and tidy, then put in a new power outlet on the wall, either routing the power cable through the wall (requires identifying a suitable place from which to pull the ...


2

I don't believe there's a neutral in this box. I say this because neutrals are generally not switched, and as far as I can see every wire in the box is connected to a switch terminal (except the grounds). The bundle of bare wires twisted together capped with a yellow wire nut are grounds. Grounds can be bare or green. This will be a problem. the ...


2

Hi grant welcome to stackexchange. I don't what part of the world you are in but if you are in the US. No you can't do what you are suggesting. I haven't had time to figure out how many code violations are involved, but I will start with the fact that you cannot pass an extension cord through a wall or partition. So let's just say NEC Article 400 in ...


2

Google Home is nice, but you can't control primary room light exclusively with it. The building codes absolutely require that some lighting in each room be controlled by plain wall switches in standard locations. The locations of the mandatory switches are defined by Code. The brightness level is defined by Code, though in some living spaces it is allowed ...


1

Another clean solution for this, which I have deployed in my own house, is to use the smart switch technology from Lutron. They have the Caseta series one of which is a smart plug module that goes into an outlet and then can have a lamp plugged into it. The unit has on/off and dimmer control buttons right on it. Then they have their PICO remote control that ...


1

Yes, that's fine You can connect a battery to the DC side of the NAT router directly and have that be its primary power supply. You would discontinue use of the router's own power block, and use an appropriate off-the-shelf battery charger for that battery type. This battery charger will be perfectly safe if UL listed, and will simply plug into the wall. ...


1

Brown from main to L, brown from light to L1 blue to N: take a 4cm piece of blu wire and pigtail it to other blues, PE connect together the two PE with another wire nut because your new dimmer is class II and don't need the Protective Earth. If you don't have a wire-nut just put the two blues together into the N place and recycle the nut you have for the ...


1

Put the two blues into the N connector The browns go into L and L1, but you have to get them the right way round. one of the browns goes to the lamp and the other comes from the supply (you will probably need to check for voltage to determine which is from the supply) The supply brown goes into L and the lamp brouwn into L1 join the earth wires with an ...


1

A wiring diagram would be helpful. In leu of that , the transformer has 4 terminals. Two on the high voltage side and two on the low voltage side. It looks like the black and yellow wires on the transformer are the high voltage wires. The other side has a red with an inline fuse and a brown and green in the same terminal. The green goes to ground. The brown ...


1

This will depend a lot on area, and need. First, lets cover the builder's options to you. They both suck. You can have them do the work of running wires for way to much money, or you can get some unknown wireless router, for again, way too much. On this front your builder is just straight up ripping you off. On an existing, "normal" sized house (which is ...


1

Most large homebuilders will not allow the buyer to work on the house at all during construction. It is written into the contract. I was formerly the purchasing manager for two of them. I agree that $800 is a lot for a pre-wire. All builders have a better profit margin on options and that margin varies a lot by builder. The options are particularly ...


1

If your provider offers wireless service (WiMax, 4G, LTE, etc.) then there are external, directional antennas that will extend service to marginal areas. You will need to research exactly what frequency band they are using. But as Hobbes says, it is not typically "WiFi" as that is meant for LOCAL service inside a home or business. Unless you are "pirating" ...


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