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15

If this is a submersible pump in a fairly shallow well and it is running continuously and only putting out 20psi, you have several possible problems: The impeller assembly is coming apart and there is excessive internal leakage in the pump. There is a leak in the pipe leading from the pump to the well-head, either the pipe has split, or the barb fitting ...


7

Not really. You can do that if you only turn on the pump when you're consuming water. You don't want the pump running if no water is moving. You'll wear it out. The point of a pressure switch is to prevent just that, and the point of the pressure tank is to reduce the frequency of pump startups (along with stabilizing pressure during usage).


5

I'd guess that the recovery rate on your well is sufficient for your daily use, but not for the extended used that occured with the hose. As a result, the water level in your well has probably dropped to the point that the intake tube isn't completely submerged, so it's drawing less water. If you can reduce your water usage for a few days, it will likely ...


5

There's a good reason it's "an insane buy" but since you seem to be committed regardless (these things are why you pay an inspector and put conditions in the contract allowing you to walk away if inspection turns up issues...) There's no guarantee that a new well with solve any (much less all) of the issues, unless it ends up in a different water supply (not ...


5

You can, but it is considered an injection well and is regulated by law: In the United States, injection well activity is regulated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state governments under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). EPA has issued Underground Injection Control (UIC) regulations in order to protect drinking water ...


4

You might want to check with knowledgeable people about drilling in your area. Perhaps you have dug into bedrock. Or there is a large monolith buried there. :-) In the U.S., the USGS has much data available for your perusal. Perhaps you have neighbors with wells? Talk to them and see what their experience was. Even if theirs were drilled 50+ years ago, ...


4

You can, but it's not all to the good... Normally, most household plumbing fixtures (especially toilet valves) prefer a pressure of no more than 80 PSI. Your pipes are nearly always not the limiting factor. Most well pump controllers have a fixed 20PSI swing from on to off, but many can be adjusted so they can swing 40-60, 50-70, 60-80, 30-50, 23.5-43.5 etc....


4

As isherwood noted, never run the pump unless the water has somewhere to go. Also, running the pump for only a few seconds at a time is probably not ideal. If you're pumping out through an open pipe into some sort of large receptacle (e.g. a 5-gallon bucket or larger), that's probably fine. (I chlorinate my water, so my well pump feeds an open pipe that ...


4

Pump it out for a while. If the pump controller does not have a "low pressure cutoff" pay attention so you don't leave the pump on if you manage to pump it dry. Common to "shock treat" (chorinate, recirculate, let sit, then flush out) on general principles. If the cap has been in place these 15 years there really isn't anything that should have gotten in, ...


3

It's not a free pass going to higher pressure. First off, any given pressure tank has a larger drawdown (tidal volume, amount of useful water stored) at 20/40 than any higher setting. Unless you increase the size of, or add additional pressure tanks, at a higher pressure your pump will stop and start more frequently (which is usually considered to be a ...


3

If you are fundamentally opposed to (or trying to avoid paying taxes on) an aboveground structure, you could bury a vault to put at least a small pressure tank in. With use of a "constant pressure valve" or a variable-speed "constant pressure pump" you can get away with quite a small pressure tank (2-5 gallons) but you really can't run a pump without any ...


3

It's heating the existing water in the tank. And the tubes between the pump and the tank don't carry water; they carry refrigerant. The pump heats the refrigerant using the latent heat of the well water. The refrigerant goes through a large coil in the tank, heating the coil. The coil is immersed in your soft/clean water.


3

We did turn off the water last night and the power to the water pump and found that over a couple hours time we lost all the water in our reserve tank. Does this sound like a leak to you? Maybe. Was the reservoir tank cut off (like with a valve) from draining back down the well? If there is a check valve, is it in good working order? If not, it is hard ...


3

I saw this at a house in NH -- crazy high electric bills caused by a corroded pipe nipple between the tank and the the pressure switch. The pump was running all the time, but since there was no pilot light or other indicator in the house, the only clue was that the water pressure and electric bills were unusually high. The pump was too small to trip the ...


3

Jet pumps were a great idea when pump motors were terribly unreliable, and you could keep the pump motor out of the well by using one. These days, that's not true. Likewise, anyone who recommends a "3-wire" submersible is also living in the past. Things have changed. I'd suggest a 2-wire pump (there are 3, but one is the ground, and not counted as per usual ...


3

Since you are asking about a very old well in your comment , how long can a well last? There are water wells still in use today from biblical times. If they are deep enough and have not been contaminated by surface water or things being dumped in them the well will last as long as there is water. You would want to have a sample tested to make sure the water ...


3

It won't hurt the breaker any. All modern breakers are rated for use as switches.


3

1) Use common household bleach as the chlorine source for disinfection. [Bleach products usually contain 5 to 6 percent chlorine. For the disinfection procedure to be effective, the pH (acidity) of the well water should be between 6 to 7.5. If it is not in this range, then a well treatment professional experienced in disinfection ...


3

The tank has a bladder inside the bladder holds the water on the outside of the bladder( inside the tank is filled with air) . With the tank empty of water we normally pressurize the air to a few pounds less than the pump turn on pressure. So if your pressure switch is set for 40-60 it turns on at 40 psi and when it reaches 60 it turns off in this case we ...


3

The only person who will know for sure what your home owners policy covers will be your insurance agent. Best we could do is guess. I honestly have no idea. As far as the expense of repair, it depends on how much of the labor you can do yourself. Excavators aren't exactly cheap to rent, but they aren't thousands of dollars either. Pipe itself is usually ...


2

I am surprised no one mentioned at leak in the pipe from the well to the house(s). That can cause quite a bit of water usage. Look for water standing between the house and the well. It helps if you know roughly where the pipe runs. A couple years ago I hit almost 90 dollars in usage in one month. Normal is around 25 dollars. From there either start digging ...


2

Sounds like a really odd setup you have there. The main water shutoff is between the pump and the pressure switch?? That is the only way that the pump would remain running like this. Water pressure in the house on the other side of the main water water shut off drops telling the pump to turn on. The pump stays running till the valve is opened again. Since ...


2

There are a variety of risks, including the risk that the system will fail to work as intended. You either punt those to let someone else design the system, or you take them on yourself when you design it. To look at just one that you've thought of: Not growing bacteria in your water system is pretty much a matter of having clean water to start with and ...


2

It can backflow if you lose pressure. Perhaps from a power outage, or if you draw water faster than the pump can replenish it. Backflow valves (check valves) are pretty cheap (about $5 - $10). If the consequences are as severe as you make them out to be, I'd put one in. Also I would add a carbon filter after the RO system, that would remove ammonia and ...


2

Your aphorism of the day: Theory and Practice are the same in Theory, but Different in Practice. As a practical matter it's going to be near-impossible to fabricate, install, and install a pump or suction pipe into a plastic-sheet-tube without poking a hole in the plastic. If you manage to succeed, you've disabled your well - if no water can get out, no ...


2

You could get rid of the mortar debris using a chisel or a good flat-bed screwdriver and a hammer. Just put the point of your chisel on the debris and hit on top of the chisel with your hammer (be careful of your chisel holding hand). Note: you should put your brick on a hard surface or else you'd break your brick as well! After being all done with the ...


2

Allowing for the possibility that it could be otherwise as diagnosis via internet is imperfect.... I see both a pump problem and a check valve problem here. While they may be located in the same place (if your only check valve is on the pump - which is the way mine is set up) they are not the same thing...though I also see another possibility that would do ...


2

If your water does not freeze up in the winter, they are presumably buried below frost line for your area - which is typically where they do get put by competent installers (and not terribly deep if there is no frost.) In my area that's 4-5 feet, typically. In most but not all cases it will probably be the shortest, most direct path from where it comes out ...


2

If the lever you are referring to is on the side of your pressure switch: Then I unfortunately have not very good news for you. As the name implies, this cuts off the switch entirely when the pressure drops to about 10psi below the cut-in point (eg, most well pumps are set up to turn on at 40 and off at 60psi, so the low-pressure point is about 30psi). It's ...


2

Priming one will be a pain in the posterior, after which it will probably work until it loses prime. I know, because I've done it (well - almost - not a well, but a large amount of water from about 8 feet down). I'd suggest buying a pump that will be less of a pain in the rear to use if you are going to spend money on this. I did have a free pool pump ...


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