32

My neighbor came over and we found that the filter was clogged. When we installed a new filter the water started to work.


14

To summarize all of this...You found a plugged filter that was causing the problem. Congratulations! We all need to be careful about giving advice in situations like this without knowing more. There are many types of water systems: Old, hand dug wells; Cisterns; Surface wells; drilled wells with steel casing; Springs feeding a holding tank that is pumped ...


8

Not really. You can do that if you only turn on the pump when you're consuming water. You don't want the pump running if no water is moving. You'll wear it out. The point of a pressure switch is to prevent just that, and the point of the pressure tank is to reduce the frequency of pump startups (along with stabilizing pressure during usage).


7

Neutral is not needed here as the pump is 240V only with no N connection. Connect the green to ground and you should be all set.


6

The filter at the entrance to the pump could be clogged. Enough water is getting through at the start, but the pumping cause debris to quickly clog up the filter, reducing pressure. The water in the casting at the bottom could have a lot of debris now, clogging the filter at the inlet of the water pipe at the bottom of the well.


6

We have a low-producing well, and I installed a "pump saver" electronic device that detects when the pump is under no load (sucking air or no input) and shuts it off. It stays off for an adjustable period of time. These devices run about $200 but can really pay off in saved pump motors.


6

Need is not the right word here. Preferred is probably a better choice. 240V is preferred because submersible pumps are often well away from the house and deep down in the hole and you must run a wire there capable of supplying its power needs without too much voltage drop in the line. While you could do this with a large AWG wire at 120V, you can use a ...


5

I'd guess that the recovery rate on your well is sufficient for your daily use, but not for the extended used that occured with the hose. As a result, the water level in your well has probably dropped to the point that the intake tube isn't completely submerged, so it's drawing less water. If you can reduce your water usage for a few days, it will likely ...


5

As isherwood noted, never run the pump unless the water has somewhere to go. Also, running the pump for only a few seconds at a time is probably not ideal. If you're pumping out through an open pipe into some sort of large receptacle (e.g. a 5-gallon bucket or larger), that's probably fine. (I chlorinate my water, so my well pump feeds an open pipe that ...


5

Water can only flow so fast underground because it is flowing through soil. This is unlike above ground where flow can keep increasing either by getting faster or deeper or wider. You probably took more water out than the well can supply over that given time. It takes time for it to recover because the soil and water profile around your well is affected for ...


5

The well isn't always close to the house. And pumps don't do well with sucking water out of a distant well, priming will be an issue. If you have freezing issues then you should add some insulation to your pump house and/or you can add a heat source controlled by a thermostat that prevents the temperature inside the well house (or at least the water lines ...


5

The tanks are (should be) connected in parallel, not series. They all branch off of the cold water supply line. They can even be distributed around the building water distribution system, so long as the pipes are not absurdly small. If a valve (1/4 turn full-port) is provided for each tank (some extra expense) they can individually be removed and replaced as ...


4

The first: Whip -> Washer -> Hole in Box -> Nut (rubber washer outside box) not Whip -> Hole in Box -> Washer -> Nut (rubber washer inside box) You want the plastic washer on the outside for a watertight seal, and the nut on the box for mechanical strength and with a metal box, to bond the fitting to the box electrically.


4

You are experiencing a fairly normal event for a well with pump and pressure tank, though if the behavior seems new & different the pressure tank may require maintenance or repair/replacement. Most well pumps (there are exceptions, such as "constant pressure pumps") run on a simple differential pressure switch with a 20 PSI differential (often non-...


4

Option 1: the well is uphill (about 92 feet vertically) and a pump is entirely optional. Option 2: the well is textbook artesian, (water comes out the top under pressure equivalent to being 92 feet uphill, unless a pressure seal is in place) and a pump is entirely optional. Option 3: the pump is running all the time, and is worn out, and can't make enough ...


3

Allowing for the possibility that it could be otherwise as diagnosis via internet is imperfect.... I see both a pump problem and a check valve problem here. While they may be located in the same place (if your only check valve is on the pump - which is the way mine is set up) they are not the same thing...though I also see another possibility that would do ...


3

I saw this at a house in NH -- crazy high electric bills caused by a corroded pipe nipple between the tank and the the pressure switch. The pump was running all the time, but since there was no pilot light or other indicator in the house, the only clue was that the water pressure and electric bills were unusually high. The pump was too small to trip the ...


3

I figured it out. It turns out that part 16 (gasket) and 17 (cast-iron seal plate) (which to me, looked like part of the casing (part 1) came apart to allow the casing to slide off. I didn't realize they were separate from the casing as they were flush with it and painted the same blue color all over. The two pieces popped apart fairly effortlessly at the ...


3

We did turn off the water last night and the power to the water pump and found that over a couple hours time we lost all the water in our reserve tank. Does this sound like a leak to you? Maybe. Was the reservoir tank cut off (like with a valve) from draining back down the well? If there is a check valve, is it in good working order? If not, it is hard ...


3

Jet pumps were a great idea when pump motors were terribly unreliable, and you could keep the pump motor out of the well by using one. These days, that's not true. Likewise, anyone who recommends a "3-wire" submersible is also living in the past. Things have changed. I'd suggest a 2-wire pump (there are 3, but one is the ground, and not counted as per usual ...


3

On a submersible pump, the motor is cooled by the water. If the pump starts sucking air, water is no longer flowing around the motor, the motor overheats. A well in operation produces a cone of depression in the surface of the water level in the aquifer. If the aquifer is very permiable, the cone is shallow. If you have a restricted aquifer the cone is ...


3

The 1.5HP rating is the mechanical output power of the motor, not the input electrical power. The way these motors are specified is that they put out rated power at rated current and frequency when consuming the full-load amps. Your naive current calculation fails to take into account motor efficiency and power factor. In other words, the real calculation ...


3

As Jim Stewart said in the comments, this likely has nothing to do with the pipe size. Reducing water line size is a common practice. The pressure is the problem - the pump is generating more than the system can handle and causing damage. You asked "how can I lay a new water line" and specified above ground. Usually this is a bad idea because above ...


3

The tank should be empty but with no air in the bladder the water may not have been pushed out. It sounds like your compressors not properly seating on the Schrader valve, I have filled pressure tanks with bicycle pumps in the past it takes a while but any pump should do the job if it has a standard valve stem adapter. Your observation that there is no pffft ...


3

It won't hurt the breaker any. All modern breakers are rated for use as switches.


3

The only person who will know for sure what your home owners policy covers will be your insurance agent. Best we could do is guess. I honestly have no idea. As far as the expense of repair, it depends on how much of the labor you can do yourself. Excavators aren't exactly cheap to rent, but they aren't thousands of dollars either. Pipe itself is usually ...


3

Fuses and breakers may have different trip/blow curves. Disconnect switches are for reasons other than merely fusing. Among other things so the person servicing a machine has line-of-sight to the person about to throw the switch on. You can change the breaker if you like, but there is actually an exception in code for certain motor loads, to allow ...


3

The clicking is the relay being pulled in. This is a common failure in relays after thousands of cycles the contacts burn and do not make good contacts, I have special burnishing tools to clean the contacts and this can also be done with a fine sandpaper (400+ grit), but cutting away contact material is a short term fix in some cases. A new relay is going to ...


3

The jet pump may have a failed jet or plugged with sediment , that you can feel vibration on the submersible would concern me that must be really in bad shape to feel movement.


3

You are (and may not realize if you did not pay attention in geometry class) talking about a nearly 2/3 reduction in pipe size (area/cross section) when you go from 1-1/4" to 3/4". Area of a circle = Pi r squared. 1.23 .vs. 0.44 square inches for the pipes under consideration here. That will definitely have "a negative impact on pressure and ...


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