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42

You're correct that 20A receptacles are not allowed on 30A circuits. 30A receptacles only. The manufacturer is competent and the item is UL-listed. What the UL-approved instructions really mean is you would be allowed to wire a dedicated 20A welder circuit. Special rules for a dedicated welder circuit: since it is dedicated to the welder, certain NEC rules ...


12

Generally the NEC prohibits 20A receptacles on 30A breakers, but Instructions are part of the NRTL Listing (UL/CSA/ETL), and override general NEC provisions. So if the product is listed it's code legal. If you have a 20A receptacle on a 20A breaker you will need to operate at a less than max setting. 2017 NEC 110.3(B) Installation and Use. Listed or labeled ...


3

I would say that holding a candle is pretty critical. I'd get a Mapp gas torch and some small brazing rods and do it right.


3

I would try to cut as close to one end as i could so you effectively have just the curved end. Then cut out the "couple of inches" off the end that you removed the end piece from and weld your curved end plate back on. This would be the most aesthetically pleasing but you could remove a section of the middle, you would have a weld bead in the ...


3

The return electrode needs to be electrically connected to whatever you are welding. Connecting it directly to the item being welded is best. If you connect it to the table, then the connection between the table and the item being welded would have to be good, and it usually isn't. The bit you have quoted specifically says that both clamps (you appear to be ...


3

If you can't straighten the pillars by mud jacking as Sherwood suggested, I'd suggest embedding rods into the pillars, then attaching the jambs (your 2x2 posts) to those and getting them nice and vertical. Once the jambs are vertical, it should be a piece of cake to attach the hinges and strike plate so your gate is centered, vertical, and balanced. Trim out ...


2

The simple solution (unless you drag it to other places with different receptacles) is to put the appropriate 4-prong plug on the cord, with the neutral prong of the plug not connected. Another option is to add a box next to your box with the 4-prong receptacle and install the correct 3 prong receptacle in it. If you plug in and operate two things at once ...


2

A: Do it so it's adjustable. B: My first thought is to hang it so the gate is level. This would require that the gate NOT be centred since you have more lean on one side. C: Once the gate is level, then add trim pieces to hide the wedges of space. Have you checked out mud jacking? This is used here to relevel driveways, sidewalks and front steps. In ...


1

This is well within the realm of DIY and you're not in any kind of danger, even if the whole post were gone you'd still have the railing top welded together and the torsional resistance of the monolithic baluster/top-and-bottom-rail assembly. You would not fall through without working hard to make that happen. Ice damage isn't at play here. Rust always looks ...


1

If it was my project, I'd get a body grinder (like those used in auto body shops), grind away much of the rust and old paint, assess the damage. If you end up seeing that it's very badly rusted, maybe even rusted thru, it's decision time. You could patch it with a couple of steel plates epoxied, or welded to the lower part of the post...it would be ...


1

Yes a refrigerator compressor can pull a vacuum but it may not last long because as you reach a vacuum there is no air to transfer the heat away from the windings. The heat buildup and motor failure this is something taught in hvac training when you pump Down a system using its own compressor. you don’t run it at a vacuum or you will smoke the compressor ...


1

If you're good with a stick welder, stick with it(no pun intended). Just use a 3/32 rod and set your welder amperage at around 90 Amps. Do a little practicing. As far as "pretty" goes, that will totally depend on your experience but you can definitely get those results with a stick welder.


1

I am not an expert welder by any means but if you were to watch enough YouTube videos on the subject you would come to know that welding very thin materials is an art unto itself. You said nothing in your question about the type of welder that you use (ARC, MIG or TIG) but one of these types is probably going to be much better at avoiding melt through on ...


1

I agree with Alaska Man, but I would also considering cutting off both ends. The reasons being: The shape may not be a true cylinder, so cutting material out of just one end may make it appear lopsided. If you cut one end and re-weld, you've got to make your weld perfect and profile it in order to match the other end. If you cut both ends and re-weld, you ...


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