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42

You're correct that 20A receptacles are not allowed on 30A circuits. 30A receptacles only. The manufacturer is competent and the item is UL-listed. What the UL-approved instructions really mean is you would be allowed to wire a dedicated 20A welder circuit. Special rules for a dedicated welder circuit: since it is dedicated to the welder, certain NEC rules ...


41

According to an ozzie web site, it's a non-flint electronic spark lighter.


31

I would look at drilling and tapping the hole then screwing a new handle in.


23

That welding would be termed by one of my instructors as “bird droppings”... It needs to be done properly where the weld joins and fills the 90 gap evenly and is called a fillet weld. Get them to grind it out and do it properly. A 4” angle grinder with a new disc will get into that. Have a look at some of the welds shown here: https://www.youtube.com/...


21

Given your lack of welding experience and the tricky nature of the welding you'd need to do: Bolt a new lock onto the door, forget this one / optionally cut or grind it off. Welding options other than a generator/welder: Oxy-acetylene torch weld it, but that's still at least hundreds of dollars and you have no training/experience with it. There is at ...


13

It is a electric striker for lighting a oxy acetylene torch , I have the same one, I bought it about 30 years ago.


12

Generally the NEC prohibits 20A receptacles on 30A breakers, but Instructions are part of the NRTL Listing (UL/CSA/ETL), and override general NEC provisions. So if the product is listed it's code legal. If you have a 20A receptacle on a 20A breaker you will need to operate at a less than max setting. 2017 NEC 110.3(B) Installation and Use. Listed or labeled ...


10

A rule of thumb is that a good weld looks good . Your base metals look like stainless ; If it is strongly magnetic it is ferritic or martensitic. If one of those the welder must use the right fillers to avoid hard brittle welds. The weld shown does not inspire confidence.


7

I would consider epoxying this one into the unlocked position, then adding a new one with a carriage bolt through from the outside. Epoxying this one unlocked eliminates it as a source of nuisance lock-ins or having it slide open and preventing the door from closing. (Effectively removing the lock without actually removing it. i.e. the lazy way out. :D) ...


6

Those are classification codes, the most common in the US being the American Welding Society (AWS) numbering system. You may see labels such as AWSE6011, E6011, or simply 6011. These values all mean the same thing, some just provide a bit of extra information. Carbon Steel {AWS}E6011 The first part simply tells you which standard is used. in this example, it'...


6

Breathing the vapors is not a good thing. Especially with galvanized metal. It is important to have proper ventilation. Many times when working indoors I use a small fan pointed above the work to move the fumes away and not disturb my shielding gas (wire welding & TIG). When stick welding the fan really has little affect. Breathing the "smoke" caused by ...


6

I think you might be waaaay over-complicating this The pictured shoot bolt can't possibly be for security, as it could probably be pried off with pliers, or defeated in a couple of minutes with just a hacksaw blade, so I surmise its only purpose can be to hold a door shut in the wind etc You take a battery grinder or a hacksaw, a pair of pliers and thick ...


5

Although proper ventilation is probably the most effective defense against breathing metal fumes, I believe that P100 respirator cartridges (the soft pink discs that fit onto a standard half- or full-faced respirator) will remove most of the nasty components of welding fumes, assuming you're willing to wear a respirator while welding.


5

I would use an aluminum safety rail floor flange. Something like this Hollaender 45-5 square floor flange:


5

As others mentioned, bolts are better option in your case. But for other purpouses: Where I live (Bulgaria, Europe) it is pretty much popular to rent a generator, welding equipment, concrete mixer or other tools and equipment that costs more than 100 EUR and one would not buy it for one-off job. You pay like 1/30 to 1/10 of the equipment price for a day (...


5

In my humble opinion, 8mm rods are way to big for 16 gauge mild steel. You'd need about 250 Amp for that size rod and you'd melt your stock. I wouldn't use a rod any bigger than 1/8". You'd need 50 to 90 Amps for that size rod. A 6013 welding rod should work fine and it's good for ac and dc welders. Since you're a beginning welder, practice on a few pieces ...


4

If it restarted shortly after cooling, you may have exceeded the duty cycle. The duty cycle on the spec sheet lists it as 65% @ 110 amps and 35% @ 140 amps. What this means is at max power you can weld for you can weld for 3.5 minutes then it is required to let it rest for 6.5 minutes before resuming. If you exceed the limits the unit shuts off to prevent ...


4

You can't install a 10-30R. That's off the table. The question is whether you can install a 6-30R with hot-hot-ground wires, or run hot-hot-neutral-ground wires and install a 14-30R. You need to check this. But most likely these machines are 220V-only and have no need for neutral. If so, those machines should not have had the 10-30 plug on them in ...


3

Because you're just piddling globs of molten welding rod on top of the steel. That's not welding, that's metal deposition. You need to read more on how to weld and get more practice, because the concept hasn't really (forgive the pun) penetrated. Also, it helps to grind or media blast the mill scale and other contaminants off the area you're welding.


3

I think you mean soldered? A picture would help, a lot. There should be a flexible line going from the valve to the pipe system that detaches by loosening the hex-nut fitting. If there isn't a flex, you will be cutting it out and installing it properly, so that swapping out the next tank in ten years doesn't require calling a plumber, again. I'm guessing ...


3

In my analysis your design is not going to be adequate. Here are the main points: Box steel with just 3mm thick walls can deform when squeezed under bolting pressure or when subjected to torsional pressure when bolted through the box. Carriage bolts with the square tang under the head are meant to be used with wood. Unless you intend use dozens of hours ...


3

It is a "MIG" (Metal-Inert-Gas) welder in the sense that it does have a shielding gas for the weld - but the shielding gas comes form the flux core in the wire being vaporized during the welding process and not from a separate gas supply. You'll note in the product listing "Requires flux cored wire " - because without the flux core there's no shielding gas.


3

For the ultimate in danger and minimum in life expectancy, it is possible to do some janky stick welds using a couple car batteries wired in series. Some off-roaders are known to carry along a couple sticks in order to fashion janky repairs in the field using only jumper cables and the batteries from all of the convoy's vehicles. No links because......


3

One option is brazing, i.e. soldering with brass or other semi-hard metal. Its durability is somewhere between epoxy and welding. First you'll need to clean the pin and the hole really well, with a small wire brush or sandpaper. After that, further clean with acetone or other solvent (avoid hitting any paintwork nearby). Do this step meticulously, as proper ...


3

A welding unit needs a power source compatible with its power requirements. For the Miller Multimatic 220 AC/DC, that varies with your intended usage and amp draw. If you're intending to stick weld heavy steel at 200 A (welding current), you're going to need a 240 volt power source rated at at least 32 amps (i.e., 40 or 50). Also keep in mind your duty cycle;...


3

I would try to cut as close to one end as i could so you effectively have just the curved end. Then cut out the "couple of inches" off the end that you removed the end piece from and weld your curved end plate back on. This would be the most aesthetically pleasing but you could remove a section of the middle, you would have a weld bead in the ...


3

If you can't straighten the pillars by mud jacking as Sherwood suggested, I'd suggest embedding rods into the pillars, then attaching the jambs (your 2x2 posts) to those and getting them nice and vertical. Once the jambs are vertical, it should be a piece of cake to attach the hinges and strike plate so your gate is centered, vertical, and balanced. Trim out ...


3

The return electrode needs to be electrically connected to whatever you are welding. Connecting it directly to the item being welded is best. If you connect it to the table, then the connection between the table and the item being welded would have to be good, and it usually isn't. The bit you have quoted specifically says that both clamps (you appear to be ...


2

I've seen this myself and agree, yes, there is a difference in the light outputs between inverter and transformer type welders (even at the same amperage setting). I also have seen a difference between different models of inverter MIG welders. I don't precisely know what makes the difference, but I am guessing it has to do with differences in the switching ...


2

Just go with car or truck exhaust pipe from the auto parts store. It'll be the cheapest & weld great. I'd even go with top & bottom C's as your back, top & bottom cross-member mountings & stands to really optimize efficiency.


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