5

Sealing the vapor barrier You'll want to seal the vapor barrier to the fan housing using an acoustic sealant like OSI® SC-170™, or similar product (you might have to do this from above). Just make sure the sealant is approved for use with vapor barrier, some sealants won't adhere well to the vapor barrier. If there is enough plastic to lap up the side of ...


5

You could use a spray foam insulation like Great Stuff. It sticks to just about everything and expands to fill voids.


4

When you have to fill the gap, use stainless steel or copper wool (not kitchen pad with soap though) and optionally foam the gap closed. The metal stops the mice from eating through the foam.


4

Identification in order, P, Half-Round and Quarter-Round Referred to as door seal or weatherstrip. Commonly available for aircraft door seal and older automotive trunk and door weatherstrip. You can get EPDM variants for home door seal use from WeatherKing or MD. The larger stuff used in automotive can be obtained by the roll from industrial supplies ...


4

A thermal imaging gun will show you all the hot and cold spots inside your house, but they are very expensive. What I did was I purchased a infrared thermometer gun at my local harbor freight. It cost about $15.00 Then I went around took all the temperatures throughout the house. I found in my basement the rim joists were not insulated, I also found my ...


3

Something moved or warped. The door, the door jambs, the wall... Easiest thing to do is add additional weather stripping. They make weather stripping that comes on either wood or aluminum strips for attaching to the door jambs. Comes with either the D style weatherstrip or the kerf style which you purchased. It's basically what you bought with a rigid piece ...


3

There is a removable clear caulk you can buy from most home improvement stores that you can use to seal that window and peel the stuff off. I bought some from Menards at $2.50 each on sale. Caulking guns can be bought for a couple of bucks.


3

I have seen this type of weather stripping many times on sliding doors. There is a flange on the weather stripping that fits into the mill work. It is a bit difficult to remove, and even harder to replace. They sell the replacements at most box stores. It is important to remove the flange from a small dido (gap) in the frame. Putting the new one in is ...


3

I think it's definitely your drill bits. I got a special bit for metal when I drilled a gigantic hole in our metal front door to install a viewing port. While you could install the kind of door sweep you're attempting to install, I'd suggest you go with an alternative. We installed this on the same door recently: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Frost-King-Slide-...


3

Metal weatherstrips used to be popular, and you can still find them, but there's a reason they fell out of fashion: they require very tight tolerances at the door/jamb interface, and even if you set them up perfectly, they still don't seal as well as soft weatherstrips. I'd look into alternate solutions, like installing a storm door outside the main one.


2

Interesting question Mike. Last I knew rubber and plastic weren't on the Chez Mouse Menu. I would think that there may be some attractant stored in your garage that may be attracting them. Things like dry pet foods, nesting materials or pet water bowls can attract the little dears. Take a good look around your area for concentration of droppings. This may ...


2

I had the same problem of mice eating door bottom seals. now when I insall new door bottom seals I put bearing grease on the inside of the bottom seal. thisidea was given to me by my overhead door suplier and seams to work Thanks Casey


2

Correctly sized backer rod, a bond breaker, and properly applied sealant is the appropriate way to handle the joint between dissimilar materials with different coefficients of expansion [both thermal and moisture] such as wood trim and cement plaster.


2

For the back door, you can move the strike in towards the door stop the 3mm you need to get it to contact the weather stripping. Be careful how you do this, it will require a bit of cutting out of the jamb to move it back and reset longer screws to hold it there. Move it no more than you need, too much will make the door difficult to latch when you close it. ...


2

A FLIR (infrared) or thermal imager is still the best way; you can rent them pretty easy and cheap, even at Home Depot http://www.flir.com/homedepot/


2

Either replace the vinyl slide on bottom with a brass one that is taller, or unhang the door by taking it off of its hinges. Put a 1/2" strip of wood on the bottom (glue works nicely) Repaint the door Install the door bottom Re-hang the door


2

You will see weep holes in aluminum storm windows when the frame is projecting from the exterior wall and has a "lipped" edge. The weep holes allow drainage that otherwise would not occur because of the lipped frame edge. Wooden storm windows are usually hinged and set flush with the frame. The frame bottom is normally beveled so as to shed water away from ...


2

I'd say go for winter weather stripping, but I don't see that lasting too long. So, I'd really say go with car door Edge Moldings. There are a variety of widths & colors, they just slip over the edge & can be glued if the friction fit doesn't hold-up, literally. You'll probably want to do both doors.


2

Sounds like you're talking about "triple-track storm windows", which usually has 3 panels, 2 with glass, one with a screen; in the summer you slide the bottom glass panel up, and screen down; in the winter you slide it down. They were commonly retrofitted to older houses that had no storm windows. Newer windows (the windows themselves, not the storm windows)...


2

That looks like a good solution. There's no fire hazard there (if there were, you'd also be worried about the wood). You may have to switch to something thinner at the bottom there, and use additional pieces to fill in the joints between the blocks. Something I've used with good success are lengths of foam pipe insulation; it's cheap, and you can easily cut ...


2

For drilling into steel, use Cobalt drill bits (usually a dark black or gold) have a blunt tip with a "nub" instead of a point.


2

There are felt weatherstrips, though I don't know that you'd find that shape in them - they are fairly durable. There are "commercial" rubber weatherstrips, some of which are quite robust. There are the "V-Seal" style strips which are a more robust plastic, no foam.


2

That threshold is part of the entire door system. It wasn't added after the door was installed. It's screwed upward into the jamb sides and may have extrusion fins that engage slots in the jamb. Ordinarily a threshold doesn't wear out before the door system does, so it's rare that a person would try and remove it without replacing the door. You'll need to ...


2

Theres alot to be left desired by this installation. First of all it looks like your in the city and installed into a masonry opening. By the way your window is resting hard on the masonry sill it looks like the installation is what we refer to as brick to brick. Basically your window fits snug around the brick with maybe a quarter inch perimeter gap. ...


2

IR meters are not the best measurement tool for this but adding a shade inside or out will reduce light transmission. The only way to eliminate the warmer area is to create a dead airspace since the heat from the roof is what you are reading, even putting a piece of cardboard over the hole will help (on the inside) but I doubt this will reduce the heat load ...


1

Yeah, I had that type of bottom on one of my other garage doors. The big center slot was meant for a compression fit seal that I couldn't find a replacement for. I ended up filling that slot with this being modified. I cut the 2 tracks free, stacked them & screwed them into the top of the big slot to then put in the Clopay type single T-end bulb. A pain ...


1

It looks like the gap is caused by the hardware for this barn style door, which is a common scenario. For the best seal, my recommendation would be some pieces of weatherstripping or gasket. In the picture you show, you could place one piece vertically on the wall side of the door (on the end the picture was taken). If necessary, you could place another ...


1

One thing you can do is to get some weather stripping and install it so that it just comes up to the glass slider. If the glass slider is one that free hangs without a track or guide at the bottom it will be somewhat problematic to have the weather stripping actually contact the glass as it will likely just push the bottom of the door way from the wall. ...


1

Or get a sweep with larger "brushes"; for wide gaps I favor something like (They're available in both kerf-mounted and screw-on styles.)


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