7

Michael Karas is correct in that a half-height block foundation wall is common, but that doesn't really address your concern about water intrusion. His suggestion to seal the block does, and that wouldn't require the blocks in the first place. I would build your walls with bottom plates of treated lumber one nominal size wider than the walls themselves, ...


7

Let's start with the harder one here Smoke It looks like there's a gap in the stone to the left of the outlet. I would at least try to fill it with something (maybe caulk if you want the simplest route). Once that is done, examine the box under the cover. Make sure you don't see any other intrusion points for air. The good news is any exterior rated cover ...


5

Water infiltration can come from 1) subsurface water, and 2) surface water. Subsurface water can come from a rising water table or from hydrostatic water rising up through the soil. Rising Water Table: You indicate the building is located above the water table. That may be true under normal conditions. When an extreme rain event occurs, the water table ...


5

Living and working as a cable television technician in a beachside region, I can attest to the value of the silicone dielectric grease for improving the lifespan of these connections. Salt air eats everything in time, yet the grease prevented corrosion after five years. The fittings were assembled with "boots," rubber covers which resemble spark plug wiring ...


4

It is fairly common on a flat slab to create a curbing using stubby height concrete blocks. These blocks are typically about 4 to 5 inches in height. When used on a garage (for example) it is typical to place the curbing adjacent to the edge of the slab/foundation. In your case you where you want to inset from the edge of the slab you could choose to apply ...


4

I'd be using stainless steel deck screws or stainless steel lag screws.


3

Is this truly a brick veneer wall (one full brick deep), or an "adhered" brick veneer (1/4" - 1/2" thick)? A brick veneer wall should definitely have visible flashing, counter-flashing, and weep holes, but an adhered veneer might just have flashing behind the joint. I do see that the roof bulges along the joint, this is a good sign that there is something ...


3

No. That would be like sealing the bottom side of a sponge--moisture will travel through it to emerge in other areas. You can probably accomplish the repair even in winter. A water hose will quickly melt snow and ice from the areas you need to access, or use scaffolding and other hardware to work over it.


3

I've never seen or heard of this being done. Water in a bathroon should never make it to the studs or supports in any significant supply such that it actually creates or promotes damage or rot. The appropriate solution is to remove/stop the water source that caused the damage before it gets that far/in the first place. The flooring choices is most ...


3

Yes, because a poor connection due to subsequent corrosion can affect the signal which may well cause unreliable operation. There are waterproof junction boxes available which you should use.


3

You will probably need professional assistance with this one. Whether there is a drip edge or not, the shingles should overhang the edge of the roof by about an inch. The bigger issue is that there is no brick flashing cut into the side of the brick where it meets the roof in the second two pictures. Some shingles are going to have to come up to correct ...


2

That's a water proofing hard'ish plastic called air gap waterproofing membrane, commonly referred to as dimple board. it's not a part of the vapour barrier and it's primary function is to stop water from the water table entering the foundation. It's is good practice to run that it up higher so that it's flush with the finished grade upon completion. The ...


2

That looks like the results of condensation due to an uninsulated exterior wall being much cooler than the inside temperature and humidity being high inside the room due to respiration overnight or nearby washbasins, bathroom etc, unventilated kitchen etc.


2

I wanted to comment on this but don't have enough reputation. My childhood house had these marks in the basement on interior walls. They looked just like the marks in your picture. They only occurred on walls near my bathroom where people generally took long, hot showers. I'm not saying this is the cause, but for me they clearly had a correlation with the ...


2

Exposed nails not only look bad but the heads will deteriorate faster being exposed. On the occasion I have a shiner I will cover it with a small amount of roof patch. I use an asphalt based patch and collect some of the sand from a bundle then it is hard to see even if you know it's there.


2

the reason is the shape and location of this ledge: Therefore, take all the ledge off, look for slits (which are taking water inside from all terrace), seal them and if need, give on edge some suitable profile you can see here: https://www.riversidesheetmetal.net/flashing-metal/masonry/custom/


2

When a 2-year-old shower is leaking, something is definitely wrong. Call the builder, and tell him to fix it. Yes, there's supposed to be waterproofing behind the tiles. The tiles and grout by themselves won't be enough to keep the water out of the wall. I don't know if there are precise rules for how high the waterproofing should go, but I would think at ...


2

Those two holes are relieving hydraulic pressure and draining the soil outside. If you plug them, the pressure may build up and you could have water coming in somewhere else. Is the water coming in now going into a sump? Is it wetting the floor and causing high humidity in the "cellar"? It sounds like you might need a French drain outside the foundation to ...


2

Since you have poured water onto the tracks and no water leaked inside; check a few more things. I don't see a gutter above the door. Use a step ladder and run some water from a hose onto the roof, downward toward the door. The water could be lipping over at the edge, into your soffit, across the top of the door and then down the sides onto the floor. ...


2

"Normal" 3-core electrical cable has a name, NM or informally, Romex. It is not listed for outdoor locations. For that, you would use its brother, UF. However, if it is all-conduit between the two junction boxes, it is not illegal to use cable, just a major pain. The more practical choice is THWN-2 or XHHW, which is individual wires and easier to work ...


2

First off, don't use wood trim. Vinyl trim is easy to find and it won't rot. Second, you can use an air nailer if you can avoid the window. Caulk will cover the holes. I would suggest using galvanized nails. If you don't feel comfortable, or you don't own an air nailer, the next best option is construction adhesive. If you went vinyl trim MAKE SURE THE ...


2

Also to make sure to seal any other air infiltration points, such as what looks to be an opening where your water spigot comes out of the wall. Sealing air infiltration points should be done whether you have water there or not, to prevent carbon monoxide or other fumes from getting into your house from the carport.


2

If the drip is that noisy, it's probably hitting a flat horizontal spot on your unit. If you can add something to the top of your unit that is at a steep angle that the drip lands on, the drip shouldn't be as noticable. You might be able to put a flower pot with just sand in it, or even an actual plant with soil on it on top of your unit?


2

1. Some water might be tolerable in a minimally finished old basement. In St Louis, a lot of houses would sometimes get some water in the basement. Some of them a fair bit. If this is going to destroy the berber rug in your man cave that is one thing. If it is going to make a small puddle that is another. If a little water entering the basement of your ...


2

How about plastic bags? You will need 2. Put inner box inside one. Leave bag open at top so concrete can push air out of the bag and flatten it against inner box. Put bagged box inside another bag. Then double bagged box inside outer box. Pour concrete between the 2 bags. Bags will flatten against boxes as they fill and contain concrete between ...


2

"water tends to flow towards the door" is your problem. The right way to fix this is to redo the exterior so water will flow away from the house. Sealing the gap would be a good secondary action, but if you leave it at that, you'll constantly be dealing with leaks.


2

If you install an apron for the gutter it could just go behind the lower flange of the drip edge. Like WoodAireGrill says, the shingles should extend a bit lower than they do. You could also cut some shingles lengthwise and bond them to the lowest existing course using roofing cement to extend the dripline. You'd slide them under and put dabs of cement ...


2

Think about replacing the sill and the casing with some of the PVC or composition boards that are available in the home stores. Any wood you put down there will be rotten again in 5 years.


1

Asphalt doesn't crack due to porosity. It cracks when it expands and contracts due to heat cycles, and as it dries out from age. Poor substrates exacerbate this. Once they are cracked freezing water has much more of an effect. Then it's able to push with enough force to cause damage. Sealers mostly preserve the surface appearance. They don't do much at ...


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