15

While I don't doubt that your father 'never installed a house wrap for a metal building in his life' I have to wonder how many of them were residences? Buildings with walls that trap moisture or where higher efficiency insulation is often needed? Bare and exposed insulation on the inside doesn't count. Wrap is about what is INSIDE the wrap, not what is ...


13

I don’t see a problem with felt for a portion as it was used for years, I believe a wrap is a good idea as it will increase the energy efficiency and keep the condensation from the metal off the sheathing. If you use insulation under the metal as used in many roofs you probably would not need a wrap but it would still be a good idea.


8

The usual approach is a couple coats of polyurethane varnish. I'd sand it a bit to clean it up and give it a coat on all exposed surfaces. Steel wool between coats. It'll be apparent when you've applied enough coats to seal the edge grain well enough to protect it. Reapply every couple years as needed. If you want the plywood to have a color, simply stain ...


7

I don't see what the issue would be with the Tyvek (or any other) house wrap. When my renovations were done, much of the brick was removed & replaced with OSB+Foam Board+ House Wrap + Hardiplank (cement board). I don't see why the metal siding would any different from the cement board in so far as using a house wrap.


7

Water heaters have pans. You place the pan under the water heater, then attach a hose to send the water someplace less damaging. You can also get water sensors, which rest on the floor and sound an alarm if water is detected. There's less stuff for dishwashers and washing machines, as they only contain water when in use, and there should be someone nearby ...


4

Some of these are supplied with “stop leak” hoses on their incoming supply pipe. Also some washing machines have the base designed with a “dip” with a sensor to turn off the internal valve if it senses water - caught my ex-wife out for a week until number one son looked at it :) ...


4

You can remove the existing grout, and re-grout with an epoxy grout. It's more expensive than regular grout but it's completely waterproof and you won't need too seal it. It's also much stronger than regular grout. However, if in fact the shower pan is broken, then this will probably be a temporary fix and you'll know when it fails because the leak will ...


3

Also in this case, a reliable way to get all necessary information concerning possible moisture, insulation and mold problems is to input each material in the layer fields on the professional Ubakus website, which is free for private use. Each layer can be switched on/off with a single mouse click to immediately see the difference. Another important aspect ...


3

I've fulfilled customer requests for overflow trays in cases of integrated laundry equipment, for example. You'd essentially install or build a shower pan (with all the same drain plumbing). What type and profile is appropriate depends on the situation. I wish my dishwasher had one as a one-time overflow recently did significant damage to my kitchen floor. ...


3

OK, grout should never have been used there in the first place because it will crack. I can see more cracking from your pictures. Your best bet is get as much of that grout out of there as you can as it will continue to crack and fall out. Once you get the grout out, get some quality silicone caulk and run a good bead of caulk around the tub. Make sure ...


3

Water flows in the direction of least resistance. Moisture is either coming up from below (a rising water table) or its coming from the surrounding ground water in the saturated soil, or both. If it comes up from a rising water table, it will enter the crawl space from below. If it comes from the surrounding ground water, it COULD enter the crawl space ...


3

Not what you are describing, but "duct seal" is a (all I've ever seen is gray) non-hardening putty intended for plugging conduits to prevent various things (air, water, rodents, insects) from coming along with the wires, usually at building penetration points. Find it where electrical supplies are sold, though it may not be all that obvious on the shelf. It ...


3

You need pelican cases. there is no need to reinvent the wheel here, you would spend much more money developing and building waterproof containers instead of buying readily available commercial products. Pelican cases are used in media productions around the world to keep all kinds of camera gear, monitors and computers dry and safe. I have worked on ...


2

They make weatherproof aluminum junction boxes such as a Bell or Red Dot, with matching blank lid. To avoid box penetrations, their mounting screws attach to "ears" that attach to the outside of the box. The holes are threaded, as for pipe. To enter a cable into such a box, take a specimen of your cable (or its measurements) to a proper electrical ...


2

To answer your question, water getting into the ground terminal of your extension cord will not trip the GFCI. If water gets into that hole though, it will probably get into the hot or neutral slot and that will trip the GFCI. Get a light with a longer cord or use some of the power cords you see in stores at Christmas time (see below). most come with covers ...


2

Kerdi is waterproof so you do not add additional barriers because as you stated, you don't want to trap moisture. Just make sure to follow all the directions and tips for successfully installing the Kerdi board.


2

I would try boiled linseed oil and turpintine. I use them for the floors on my trailers.


2

I just called and spoke with the housing inspector who had been out here inspecting the contractor's work and he said that it's normal for some waterproofing material to make its way down into the foundation drainage system after a basement wall waterproofing job. He said that I will probably need to keep cleaning off the sump pump for another 2-3 weeks and ...


2

No, it’s not normal for the edges to be loose. Poly glass is a self sealing modified bitumen roofing product. See here: http://www.polyglass.com/public/COM/products/POLYFRESKO_G_SA.pdf As you can see in Item #6 of the installation instructions, the seams are to be lapped 6” and side lapped 4”. I think it’s installed correctly. If there are loose ...


2

Your most "microbe resistant" option would be what you already thought of: a thin plastic sheet. Just glue it down with contact cement, rather than drilling and screwing, if you are worried about the screw holes (I would not be so worried about the screw holes myself...)


2

Not seeing or knowing the length of the shelves you are using, I would not use slats to assemble the top. It would be another expense saved. I would use a cross layer of selves for that if there were enough of them and the table was small enough, since this material sags readily under its' own weight. It will make the table heavier, but it is not like it ...


2

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contact_paper A type of adhesive plastic sheet But if you're really desperate for cash just seal the joins with packing tape and replace the tape as needed.


2

You can install your drainpipe on your footing or next to it, but the critical issue is that it is BELOW your basement slab. Drainpipe systems are designed to capture ground water leaking down from storm water, downspouts, etc. AND from a rising watertable. Ideally the 4” perf pipe should be encased in about 12” to 18” envelope of drainrock and protected ...


2

I have tiled a few concrete slabs and have never used anything but thinset, a membrane for a shower stall is great but for outside I believe it could have more problems than straight thinset, if you want to make it stronger add add mix or purchase thinset that is already enriched. Absolutely no need for a backer board on a concrete pad.


1

I would remove the tile. Then put down the sub floor as you described (not sure about your choice of material) over the left hand section. If what you then have is fairly flat, cover the entire floor with 1/8" luan plywood (I think this is what they used in my laundry). The final covering was vinyl plank.


1

Based on @Ack's recommendation, I found a silicone tape which I think has best the both words: protection of silicone but easier to remove/replace when necessary. See photo: I installed in the wet side and I'm not sure how the tape will hold. If necessary I'll install it in the dry side so tape doesn't come in contact with water (but silicone will still ...


1

Piece of marble. https://www.homedepot.com/p/36-1-2-in-Cultured-Marble-Backsplash-in-White-UBS37Y-3Y/308002453?MERCH=REC--pipsem--205866101--308002453--N This is a 36 x 1/2 inch strip of marble. Get something to match the marble you have. You would set it in the shower so it occludes the opening. If 36 inches is too long ask them to cut it down to size ...


1

Clear silicone is very very very easy to take off marble and glass. There is no residue after hitting it with a glass scraper and some mineral spirits - a big shower is maybe 15 minutes. For application on something like 1/4" I would put a first coat down that should fill most of the gap. Then come by about 1-3 hours later (depending on air flow and ...


1

What you are after is waterproof deck coat also known as elastomeric waterproof rubber base coat. There are different brands out there, pick one and go for it.


1

I don't know that there is a "perfect" way to insulate basement walls. When I built my house, 40+ years ago I did this: outside layer of foam board mastic (tar) on outside of block inside wall, 6 mil vapor barrier, taped fir studs, with high R board drywall I have not had moisture problems, but mileage will vary. One's biggest concern will be heat loss,...


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