7

The setting is the "input hardness". The zeolite matrix resin (the part that does the water softening) will nearly completely soften the water until it runs out of sodium. The resin in the tank is good for a certain amount of "hardness" (measured in grains), probably in the range 10,000-50,000 grains. The setting is used to calculate when the resin will need ...


7

Water softeners do use water to recharge, but it shouldn't be that much. With a new filter and all electronic controls working, most systems should send no more than 25 gallons through during a recharge cycle. The theory is that the filter media (special polymer beads, often stored in what looks like a high-pressure air tank) is "charged" with a high amount ...


6

The manual will say something like Flushing the heat exchanger with a descaling solution if mineral build up is evident. Scale build up will shorten the life of the water heater, descale heat exchanger thoroughly and repeat annually depending on mineral content of ground water. (From Bosch 2400E NG user manual) or maybe something like Periodic ...


5

The only thing that comes to mind for a practical "salt-free-softener" is a Reverse Osmosis (RO) system. You could also distill the entire water supply, but it's not practical unless you happen to be sitting on a lot of excess power/heat. An RO system is rather costly and wastes a considerable quantity of water, so they are more commonly used for drinking &...


5

B2 is a bypass valve. B1 and B3 are so you can remove the water softener to replace it and still have water pressure in the house. B2 (only) or B1, B3 (only) should be open at any one time. "All the way to the right" (wound in clockwise) is closed on a standard valve. "All the way to the left" (wound out anti-clockwise) is open on a standard valve. You may ...


5

There's a good reason it's "an insane buy" but since you seem to be committed regardless (these things are why you pay an inspector and put conditions in the contract allowing you to walk away if inspection turns up issues...) There's no guarantee that a new well with solve any (much less all) of the issues, unless it ends up in a different water supply (not ...


4

Easy water does not lower hardness. It is some wires you wrap around the pipes that cost $1500 and "magnetize" the limestone so it "will not stick to you pipes and fixtures as much". Look it up under scams, fraud etc...


4

Finally found a web page that alluded to the answer. On the front panel of the control unit there is a small raindrop. While touching the raindrop (it doesn't look like a button), push the program/enter button. It will cycle through the factory settings, such as capacity and hardness.


4

Home improvement stores typically carry test kits. I've found them right by water filters and water softeners. They usually are small paper strips that change color based on levels of hardness. The kit will also come with a legend to allow you to compare the strips.


4

No disrespect to you or your plumber, but I would be suspicious of any person who is able to predict the demise of an appliance by reading mineral andiron deposits in an aerator screen. It is common after replacing a water heating tank (or doing any work on the plumbing) for debris such as hard water minerals, silt and bits of metal and rust to break free ...


4

Forgot to update. The water conditioning company said it's not because of the regeneration time. They said that it's a fairly common issue where drain and/or control valves are dirty and either need to be cleaned or replaced. In my case they replaced both types of valves. They also advised me to run cold water (not hot) until the saltiness passed. That way ...


3

If that water softener has a shutoff valve (it should, for service purposes), your task is simple - shut off the softener and test each sillcock. If you still get water, it's hard water. If not, you may get a very small flow for a moment (until the plumbing is all depressurized) but it'll stop quickly. If it does NOT have a shutoff valve, one should really ...


3

Looking at your second photo, I'd say that the top spigot is soft and the bottom is hard. The bottom is directly connected to the water main, coming up through the concrete, through the pressure regulator (the bell-shaped object) and thus, is connected before the softener. There is no way to tell from the photos what is coming from the back-yard spigot. ...


3

"Iron Reducing Bacteria" create energy by oxidizing soluble iron in the water. In the process this creates insoluble iron which settles out and leaves iron staining. The bacteria themselves create biofilms or foamy messes in several areas, most notably toilet tanks and water heaters. Look in your toilet tank, if you have similar foam and iron staining you ...


3

It's heating the existing water in the tank. And the tubes between the pump and the tank don't carry water; they carry refrigerant. The pump heats the refrigerant using the latent heat of the well water. The refrigerant goes through a large coil in the tank, heating the coil. The coil is immersed in your soft/clean water.


3

The reservoir of your unit needs to have a reasonable amount of rock salt in it in order to create a brine. You can fill it with salt, then check it occsionally and refill when you can see water over the remaining salt. The Costco unit you linked still has two tanks, they are simply contained in a single package. Ion exchange water softeners all work on the ...


3

press and hold both at the same time: Info Center (left) & Customer Settings (up) service settings will display. It will then ask you for an authorization code. Since there is no numeric keypad, I knew that it had to be some (simple) combination of the keys available. It happens that mine was to press the Customer Settings (up arrow) button twice. ...


3

Scale will always occur except in extremely unusual circumstances that only cover 10% of the human population who obtains extremely low-calcium water in extremely wet regions like the Pacific Northwest of North America. For everyone else, scale is a fact of life. Certain minerals dissolved in the water, for instance calcium carbonate, have solubilities that ...


3

The down pipe from your water heater relief valve should not be plumbed into a drain. the output end may be hovering over a floor drain but not hard plumbed to drain lines. If the relief blows off due to high pressure (possibly steam) it could rupture a hard plumbed drain line. There are two drain lines from a water softener; one over-flo from the brine ...


3

Conductivity meters may be found online for about $12 American. They'll give you a direct reading in PPM. Some hardware stores carry the things too, but they'll ask $30 plus for them. I tested my cheap one against known standards, and it works just fine.


3

I would highly doubt that they are flammable. Water softener beads are made from zeolites, which are aluminosilicates (minerals containing aluminium, silicon, and oxygen). They are much more similar to clay than organic resins, although they may be manufactured with a binder of some sort. If you're really worried that they are flammable, try burning some of ...


3

Magnetic and electronic water softening devices do not reduce the level of calcium, magnesium, etc in your water. Don't waste your money on them. Resin water softeners that require salt are the best way to continually soften all of your water. Technically it's not the only way, a reverse osmosis membrane can also soften water, but typically not in the ...


2

That series was sold with and without a carbon filtering system which makes it a little harder to described. If you have a carbon filtering system (there's is called a "HYgene Bacteriostatic Filter Media" containing Silver Impregnated Activated Carbon) which is the more typically and suggested unless you have well water, the manufacturer suggests replacing ...


2

Ask Coke Are there any restaurants (or convenience stores/gas stations with a soda fountain that use your same water? Because Coke and Pepsi have stringent requirements for the water that goes into a soda fountain. by "soda fountain" I mean that thing, where there are 6+ flavors of soda on tap, usually ice too, and you can pump basically unlimited ...


2

There are three basic non-snake oil devices that one might use: sediment filter, RO filter, and water softener. A sediment filter doesn't remove dissolved solids. An RO filter is not suitable for high volume uses like bathing, dish-washing and clothes washing. A good water softener is the right product for your needs. But you might add an RO filter in ...


2

As a guess, the pipes got layered internally in scale, that will come out over some time (dissolving into the now softer water). Some large chunks may require filter screens, shower heads and valves to be soaked in your vinegar or CLR (containing lactic and gluconic acids). I know boilers get descaling treatment, but I've not heard of the same with standard ...


2

If it were me, I would definitely put the softener in the garage. Protecting it from weather, critters, and extreme temperature variation seem reason enough. But to also have it where you can easily monitor it daily seems reason enough again to locate it in the garage. But the water meter looks like it is above ground: Maybe the climate is safe against ...


2

In my experience, quarter-turn ball vales are extremely reliable. I've seen some incredibly rusted out plumbing, including where the valve handle has completely fallen off after rusting through, and you can still reliably shut the valve with a pair of pliers or replacement handle. It's hard to check if it's faulty 100% (without cutting pipes, anyway), but ...


2

After enough research and talking with a few different companies, this is what I have found out. Water Softener - this is good for removing Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, etc out of the water. It mainly used for getting a small degree of minerals out of the water. Using it primarily for high iron removal will decrease the life of the softener. Chlorination - ...


2

The power to the softener is only used to run the backwash and recharge cycle. It will continue to operate without power, and will even continue to soften water for a while (though it does eventually need to be recharged, depending on the hardness of your water and how much you use). Certain types of bypasses can be used as shut-off valves. A custom-built ...


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