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11

The most likely scenario is that the work on the system disturbed sediment/debris that migrated to your home water piping, plugging up your faucet aerators. Rather than the "quarter turn" you describe (which would accomplish nothing) it is probable that the aerators were removed, flushed, and reinstalled to restore flow. You should remain diligent, it is ...


9

I say BFP first. The backflow preventer must be installed before any point in the system where the line becomes "open" to the introduction of pollutants that would make the water unsafe for drinking (fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, animal wastes, bacteria, and other things you generally find in your topsoil). While a pressure reducer's basic operation (...


9

The usual remedy is to install a water-pressure regulator (aka. water-pressure–reducing valve) where the water line enters the building: They cost about $70, and the plumber should be able to install it in less than an hour. But since you live in an apartment, this is probably something the landlord or condo management company would have to arrange. There ...


8

I believe the pressure loss depends on the flow rate. There will be some loss of pressure. To avoid it you need 2" copper pipe or multiple parallel 1/2" pipes (probably more than 16).


8

To answer your question; A ball valve only controls flow not pressure. A few seconds after water is flowing a ball valve will limit the pressure based on the flow. A pressure regulator requires no more plumbing than a ball valve. A regulator will limit the maximum pressure but not flow until the set point is reached. If you can answer the question. Why do ...


7

Not clear what the reason for the question is. However, nominal water pressure for most residential homes is in the range of 40-70 psi (pounds per square inch). It can vary due to the distance from the home to the water source (such as a water tower), how much water is being used by surrounding homes (higher usage will lower the pressure), the capacity of ...


7

9 times out of 10, like Tester mentions, this is going to be the aerator. Unscrew it, run some water without it, and clean it before screwing it back on. There's all kinds of stuff that gets knocks around in the pipes when water is shutoff and things are added or replaced in the plumbing system, and the best place for them to end up is the kitchen sink ...


7

Clogged line There could be a clog in the lines feeding some of the sprinklers, or clogged up sprinkler heads. Remove all the sprinkler heads (the procedure will vary based on the type of heads). Inspect and clean the heads. Turn the system on. If you don't notice any dirt or gunk coming out, and the pressure does not increase in the low flowing outlets. ...


7

If you are on a municipal system and have pressure that high, you quite likely already have a pressure reducing valve (PRV) installed near your water meter. The International Plumbing Code requires PRVs on any water supply over 80psi. If this is the case, your PRV may just need adjustment. As they age, the spring regulating the device's operation can soften. ...


7

What did you use to connect your tub spout? I plumbed my bathroom with Pex and was heavily cautioned NOT to use Pex to run from the main valve to the tub spout because it would create exactly the issue your describing. Since the inner diameter of Pex is slightly less than regular copper (or threaded brass fittings, which is what I used) it will create a ...


7

The most likely cause is that dirt or debris from the water line repair have gotten jammed in the PRV so that it cannot close. You can remove it and see if there's anything visible that can be cleaned, but at that point, you may as well replace it with a new one that you'll know is good.


7

When you shut off your main (or any valve really but the main is the big one) and turn it back on you can cause debris or sediment that was trapped somewhere in your plumbing to dislodge. It seems to me that some debris might have gotten trapped in that faucet's aerator. Remove it and see if the pressure seems fine. If the pressure seems fine with the ...


6

First as Henry Jackson mentions the low flow shower heads are part of the the water consumption laws passed in the US. I am not sure how the US compares to other countries. I have done construction in France and in Spain and nobody has mentioned this to me and I never really thought about the pressure after installation - if I were to guess they seem to ...


5

The lucklihood is that it will reduce the pressure throughout the house significantly, especially if more than one faucet is running at once. It is also possible that the softener might not work correclty due to the reduced pressure, or that the output pressure will be even less than expected. I would think that hard water for a couple extra days would ...


5

I have a feeling your design looks like this: You should do this instead: If you make 16 parallel copper circuits, that would have an equivalent cross-section or a 2 inch pipe. However, I would probably do more like 20 circuits because all of those bends are going to introduce additional pumping/pressure losses and the extra circuits will make up for those ...


5

I'd guess that the recovery rate on your well is sufficient for your daily use, but not for the extended used that occured with the hose. As a result, the water level in your well has probably dropped to the point that the intake tube isn't completely submerged, so it's drawing less water. If you can reduce your water usage for a few days, it will likely ...


5

B2 is a bypass valve. B1 and B3 are so you can remove the water softener to replace it and still have water pressure in the house. B2 (only) or B1, B3 (only) should be open at any one time. "All the way to the right" (wound in clockwise) is closed on a standard valve. "All the way to the left" (wound out anti-clockwise) is open on a standard valve. You may ...


5

Pressure gauges commonly use a Bourdon tube. Bourdon tubes are a coiled metal tube and as the pressure increases, it forces the coil straight which then moves the needle. (think blowing a party horn, which causes it to unroll) The type of fluid (water/air) makes no difference to the tube, only the pressure exerted against the tube does. And since most ...


5

I suspect you're seeing the result of poorly-translated product descriptions from China and elsewhere. For example: Advantages: Withdrawing life greatly improved. Should not damage the leaking. The inner tube using the nylon braided package EPDM more resistant wound. Honory99 1.5m Pull-type Copper Core Explosion-proof Shower Hose This product would ...


5

It's called a pressure reducing valve (PRV) That's a PRV with a shut off and set point. The knob on the bottom is the shut off and the bigger knob with the screw is the set point. Now that you've adjusted it with pressure in the system you may have lowered it and you may need to remove some water to determine the set point. From the picture it looks like ...


5

Pumps function by providing sufficient pressure to overcome what's called the "static head" at a desired rate of flow. Static head is the weight of the water in the height of the pipe as it rises above the source. The higher the elevation, the higher the output head pressure from the pump must be. You can increase the head pressure of a pump a little by ...


5

The "overflow pipe" in the diagram is not an overflow pipe. The water heater is fitted with a relief valve which remains closed against the usual water pressure in your plumbing, but which will pop open if either the pressure or the temperature in the heater tank gets dangerously high. Overpressure will occur if the cold water inlet is somehow blocked, all ...


4

For yard sprinklers (irrigation) this is usually figured the other way around. Find out what your water supply is capable of, then build a system which will work well within that. If you have an existing system and you're trying to find an estimate without measuring... every system is different. There's not a standard pressure. To find our what your ...


4

The hose clamp is right out. All you'll do is crack something -- if you're lucky, right away. Likewise trying to inject PVC cement (705) is not a good idea. Even if you manage to plug the leaks, the majority of the joint is compromised. It will eventually fail, and the law practically says it will fail 2 hours after you've left for a 2 week vacation, ...


4

I would think you would need the backflow valve first. I don't think it maters much for operating, but I think the water co. might want it that way. Are you regulating the water pressure to your whole house? Or just the irrigation system? I ask because if you are doing the house, then you need to adjust the air pressure in your expansion tank on the water ...


4

Adjusting the whole-house water pressure is unlikely to solve this problem, simply because you set your shower temperature based on some initial balance of hot and cold. When other people draw cold water only, the pressure difference will still have the potential to affect your shower temperature. Instead, you should get a pressure balanced valve or shower ...


4

Every Lowe's or Home Depot and other places like that have a shower head that looks something like this and I find I get a much more satisfactory result when I have low water pressure. It's just got a concentrated, small diameter of holes, and solid brass insides. They tend to run anywhere from 4-12 bucks depending on where you go and what brand is available ...


4

If you have well water, you almost certainly have a pressure tank. The well pump runs until the pressure in the tank (and the overall system) is up to a predesignated level, then shuts off. The tank pressure then pushes water through the system until the pressure drops to a lower predetermined level. Then the pump motor kicks in again. This is supposed to ...


4

Here is what I found. I went to the hardware store and located two of the replacement valve cartridge made by Delta. Reading the back of them I found that one was for faucet made after 2005 and the other was for faucet made before 2006. Being that my house was built in 2000 I went for the one made before 2006. I then replaced the after market cartridge ...


4

Sounds like there's gunk stuck in the shower line somewhere between the branch for the shower and the shower's hot water valve. HOPEFULLY it's stuck right there at the valve. One thing you can do is shut off the hot water in the house, then remove the knob and valve stem for the hot water in the shower, then turn the water back on. Water will flow out of ...


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