28

My approach would be to turn off the water heater and the cold supply. Then open a hot tap below, or as close to the area of the leak, to drain the hot pipe. Then be prepared to catch the remaining water when you cut the pipe around the leak. Supplement: One can get “ice clamps” that can be used to isolate either side of the leak but can be fun if the ...


23

In addition to what FreeMan stated, if you have an electric water heater you want to turn off the breaker that feeds it. Depending on your plumbing, turning on some hot water faucets to finish some dishes or finish washing up could drain the water heater. If the thermostat for it kicks in and the water level is low, you'll burn up the element in seconds. ...


18

This is because after turning off your water you still have water in the pipes. The water heater in most houses is at one of the lowest points in the house. Meaning that even after turning off water at tap and even after leaving a faucet open, whatever is lowest will still get what water is left in the lines. It is funny because my new helpers go ...


18

If you have a wet vacuum cleaner with a slotted attachment, use that first to suck up pooling water and very wet insulation. Then pull out as much of the wet insulation around both elements as you can. If it rips, that's OK because you can add it back when it dries out. If the area around the heating elements and wiring is dry and no water is dripping or ...


14

I've turned the water off at the meter for our house more than once - I even bought my own "curb key" to do it. We've had a small variety of leaks and issues requiring this. The water company has turned it off for a variety of maintenance work too. I've never taken any particular precautions prior to turning the water off, nor had any ill effects ...


12

You should remove and replace the valve. If you cannot open it using the lever chances are good that it also will not function properly when needed. So you have a dangerous condition. It looks like you have limited space to work in so you may need to remove the downpipe from the valve before you can remove it. But a new one is cheap insurance vs. a ...


8

A cable with two insulated 4 AWG wires and an uninsulated grounding wire in a common sheath (which is what makes them a cable.) You might need a real electrical supplier, rather than Homely's Despot to find that. It's a bit out of their usual range of product.


7

This is better done with conduit As it turns out, 4/2 NM-B cable isn't even made; you could use a 4/3 NM-B cable, but that's upwards of $4/ft. You are much better off wiring this using a 1" ENT ("smurf tube") with a couple of 4AWG THHNs for the hots and an 8AWG THHN ground. Even in copper, this costs less than $3/ft; if you went with 2AWG ...


7

Do I need to set the water heater to pilot, in order to avoid the dangerous scenario outlined above? Doing anything to our water heater makes me a bit nervous. NO, In the amount of time that it will take you change the valve there will be no issues with it set to the current temperature. Once you turn the water off, even if someone opened a hot water faucet ...


6

Sorry I was on a rush. I'm in Germany and the device is called "Vaillant Durchlauferhitzer electronic VED E 27/7 Elektro-Durchlauferhitzer 27 kW" heizungsdiscount24.de/durchlauferhitzer/… Your heater is a three-phase load, most likely with the heating elements connected between the phases. I'm not an expert on german wiring practices, but my guess would ...


6

The anode rod must be electrically in contact with the steel of the inner tank. Only this will confer sacrificial protection of the steel tank. The statement in the instructions is correct. See sacrificial metal. Google "sacrificial protection". Even though you used dope and teflon tape you may well have electrical contact through the threads because the ...


5

First, it's Alibaba, for Pete's sake. Do you even have to ask? Even if we take this product seriously, I think it's too much heater crammed in too little space. Either they're wildly sacrificing safety standards, or they are constricting flow down to a trickle. Or both. If such a thing were made by a reputable manufacturer such as Siemens, GE, ...


5

Check the age of the tank. The lining is most likely leaking. The pressure vent doing what it is suppose to do, When you manual release the pressure through that valve, water is allowed to escape. The real leak is in the lining, and dripping down to the bottom of the tank. If the bottom is above your drain pan, you should be able to water dripping from ...


5

It ends up it was not directly the hot water heater. We have a leak in a hot water line that goes down into the foundation of our basement which is even worse. I thought I'd come back and update in case someone sees this in the future. Thank you to all who answered.


5

I'm reading that I need to shut off the water, then drain the lines, before making the repair. Yes and no to draining the lines. You really only need to drain the lines enough that you don't flood yourself when you take out the fitting or valve. All this generally means is to shut off the water and then open a faucet at or below the level of the pipe you're ...


4

The purpose of the anode is to corrode first before your tank does. It may be that your water chemistry is such that the anode is only consumed slowly (or absurdly fast-- one of our clients had an anode go from 1" diameter down to the steel core in a few weeks due to their chemistry problem). If you check the anode periodically and see little change ...


4

Another simple and easy approach might be a repair clamp, search term " repair clamps for pipe leaks". Must meet the correct requirements like temperature, pipe type, drinking water compatibility. A drainage could be avoided, and thus the danger of destroying old valves by closing and opening them the first time after decades. If it is an old standard ...


4

It is unusual for both elements to be on at the same time in a residential water heater. The upper thermostat starts heating the water and when it gets to the set temperature it switches power to the lower thermostat. The upper thermostat has a single pole double throw switch to the lower one so both elements can't be on at the same time. If it's happening, ...


4

You are lucky to live in a place where the utility company doesn't turn off your water on a schedule because there is a water shortage. Those of us who are used to it know that nothing particularily bad happens. If you plan to work on hot water part, turn off your water heater no matter if it is powered by electricity, gas, coal or uranium rods (sun-powered ...


4

For your “with ducting”, it should not be an issue at all, since you have met the full requirements with ducting. For your “Without ducting”, in general you have met the condition, as the 300 cf room has an opening to a larger space, which meets the requirement. In your “worst-case” scenario, it would perform just like a normal electric hot water heater ...


4

The reasons for shutting off the water heater are twofold: First, if the heater comes "on" while you have things disassembled then the water in the tank will expand and may cause some minor flooding. Second, and more importantly, if something goes awry and you have to make a run to the hardware store, or some other issue drags things out, the tank ...


4

My tankless water heater (80% efficient, with stainless steel style vent) does indeed use a condensate drain in its venting system. This was required to comply with local codes and the follow the installation instructions for my particular unit. There is a “condensate drain tee” fitting which has a small hose nipple on the side, to which a condensate drain ...


3

You lost a phase Germany often delivers 3 phases of power to a home. That unit, being 27 kw, is almost certainly wired up 3-phase, and according to the spec sheets, it is wired "delta", phase-phase-phase with no interaction with neutral. What's happening is when the unit turns on, it's having the effect of connecting the live phase(s) to the dead phases(s)...


3

Yes, you can leave the main on. Just shut off the inlet to the water heater. Your hot taps at the sinks won't work of course (the cold will), but then you can drain the tank. If the tank has some age on it, expect it to take a while too, lime often builds up and clogs the drain outlet.


3

What you need is a shower priority unit Various types are available for two or three showers, with or without ladder or first-come-first-served priority. Made by Garo and available from larger electrical merchants in the UK and Ireland.


3

Why do you need two? In Europe, some showers have their own, on-board, built-in on-demand water heater just for the shower. This is called an "electric shower". Which begs the question of why you need two on-demand water heaters, since you are already installing one for the whole house. Simply using the one would solve the power problem. Or, if your ...


3

Yes, you should turn off power to the water heater, and make sure that all air is out of it before turning it back on. Depending on its location in your house relative to various outlets, air getting into the tank may be unlikely, or very likely. But if sufficient air gets in the tank (typically from opening faucets to get a little bit of water that will ...


3

Yes you can do that but it will be highly inefficient. A single larger tank is more efficient than two smaller ones with the same total capacity. This is because they have more surface area between them for heat to be lost from. So install a 50 gal. tank. You might consider an on-demand/tankless heater for your tub needs. That way you will have all the ...


3

Not gonna work. You’re on electric, and you can’t just spam on more water heaters. You need to have the electric service to power them. So let’s look at your options (other than, a smaller tub). Make sure your heater is healthy; e.g. siphon pipe is intact. A lot of water heaters get their water supply shortened when a siphon pipe rusts out. Have that ...


3

If you haven't got access to replace the strap, I'd just replace the bolt with a piece of threaded rod and a couple of washers/nuts. They won't lie flat to the brackets, but since this is just for stability, they don't need to go tight so this shouldn't matter. The above is obviously assuming that you can run a straight line between the holes on the two ...


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