44

It is highly likely that that piping arrangement is made that way to facilitate the installation of a water softener. A water softener will have a need to accept a pipe with incoming hard water and another for the outflow of conditioned water to the rest of the residence. When a water softener is installed the U shaped fittings at the bottom of those two ...


43

There are two main and opposing risks: Too high, and users get scalded Too low, and you risk pathogens, particularly Legionella bacteria, which causes legionellosis (Legionnaires' disease) Minimum temperature Legionella risk According to the paper "Legionella and the prevention of legionellosis," found at the World Health Organization website, ...


30

I have had similar problems in the past when running out, what I found is I had to hold the pilot for several minutes to get the lines full of propane again. I found it easiest to light the stove top or try until it would burn then I went to the furnace and water heater it still took a few minutes as the pilot is a very small draw but once the lines had ...


29

I'm from Serbia, just like the OP, and we do have such a myth there. After my initial rant, aimed at explaining why some of the safety assumptions that many answers here may have are wrong, I'll show installation of a typical water heater and explain a couple of issues that I see with the installation. (Feel free to skip this part) First, some background, ...


28

My approach would be to turn off the water heater and the cold supply. Then open a hot tap below, or as close to the area of the leak, to drain the hot pipe. Then be prepared to catch the remaining water when you cut the pipe around the leak. Supplement: One can get “ice clamps” that can be used to isolate either side of the leak but can be fun if the ...


27

Yes, that's a scary article but keep in mind that both safety devices have to fail to have the tank explode. The pressure release valve and the high limit on the thermostat both have to malfunction. Both of them to my knowledge operate at around 200 degrees F. The maximum you can set most water heaters is 150 degrees F but most recommendations are to set ...


26

If the water on the floor is from the water heater I would fix that problem before I do anything else. If it is coming from the tank then it probably needs replaced. You can raise the tank as high as you want but if you do I would also replace the copper flex water lines and the flexible gas line. Once those lines get older, the flex gets hard and rigid and ...


25

I wouldn't worry about it at all. A gallon of water is roughly 213 cubic inches. Assuming that you filled the tank completely (which is unlikely - see below), you would have displaced 213 * 75, or 15,975 cubic inches of air inside your plumbing. One atmosphere of pressure (14.7 psi) is defined as the pressure exerted by a 33.8 ft column of water. Assuming ...


25

I see a couple problems there. First, having a tanked heater operate at less than 140°F (60°C) is problematic. The reason is our science has advanced on the Legionella bacteria which causes Legionnaires Disease, and it turns out a "warm" water heater is a breeding ground for it and other bacteria. 140°F (60°C) is scalding, and that necessitates the ...


24

The actual amount of combustion air - i.e., air flowing past the burner to provide oxygen and leave with less oxygen but more CO2 and possibly other combustion byproducts - is very little. The gap allows additional air to flow in and the combined air, if the ductwork is designed and installed properly, flows through the ductwork and out of the house. If you ...


24

Consider the sources; it is plumbers giving you a scare story to get you to hire them. See also "aluminum wiring". It will take a chain of 3 events at once: failure of the thermostat, causing the heater to overheat the water, boiling it. the pressure relief valve fails to operate, preventing the pressure from simply blowing out the relief valve; that'...


23

If the water heater is not properly grounded, it could be dangerous but then it would be dangerous all the time, not just when you take a shower. Sounds to me like a myth that got started because someone once was injured by a faulty water heater and then the myth took on a life of its own. If the water heater is wired properly you have nothing to fear. ...


23

In addition to what FreeMan stated, if you have an electric water heater you want to turn off the breaker that feeds it. Depending on your plumbing, turning on some hot water faucets to finish some dishes or finish washing up could drain the water heater. If the thermostat for it kicks in and the water level is low, you'll burn up the element in seconds. ...


19

The pressure of the air trapped in the system is exactly the same as the water pressure. There is no area for concern pressure-wise. However, air is much less dense than water, so these problems could occur: tiny leaks which were clogged by debris might be cleared (unclogged) by air and might introduce a new drip water surge hammering might shake pipes ...


18

This is because after turning off your water you still have water in the pipes. The water heater in most houses is at one of the lowest points in the house. Meaning that even after turning off water at tap and even after leaving a faucet open, whatever is lowest will still get what water is left in the lines. It is funny because my new helpers go ...


18

If you have a wet vacuum cleaner with a slotted attachment, use that first to suck up pooling water and very wet insulation. Then pull out as much of the wet insulation around both elements as you can. If it rips, that's OK because you can add it back when it dries out. If the area around the heating elements and wiring is dry and no water is dripping or ...


17

Regardless of code, I like to get them off the floor just in case the basement floods. My preferred (and easily available anywhere) solution is a few solid concrete blocks; one under each foot. You can stack them if you want, too. This is an easy way to increase the height in 4" increments. I don't suggest using lumber. If your floor is the least bit ...


14

There are three reasons a T&P valve opens. Temperature, pressure, or a faulty valve. Temperature If the water in the heater reaches a temperature of 210 degrees F, the T&P valve will open and release water until the water temperature is reduced. As water is removed through the T&P valve, cold water enters through the inlet and mixes with the ...


14

I've turned the water off at the meter for our house more than once - I even bought my own "curb key" to do it. We've had a small variety of leaks and issues requiring this. The water company has turned it off for a variety of maintenance work too. I've never taken any particular precautions prior to turning the water off, nor had any ill effects ...


13

My understanding of pilot lights is that they heat a thermocouple, which is a mass of metal that detects heat. The electronics behind that thermocouple will shut off the gas to the pilot if the thermocouple gets cold so that if something blows out the pilot you don't have a gas leak in your home. The side effect is that you have to heat up that mass of metal ...


13

No gas shut off for either line, flex is not suitable for a stationary appliance unless it's approved CSST, duct tape on the flue, draft hood is crooked, pressure relief should terminate in a conspicuous location, those flex lines, globe valve, saddle valve, crooked seismic strap, it's old, it's leaking, plus all the problems not visible from the picture. ...


13

This is a draft diverter. If the heater was connected directly to the chimney, the hot flue gas would rise, creating draft in the heater. While that is a good thing, the amount of draft would depend on the particular chimney configuration in that installation, amongst other things. Excessive draft can cause problems, such as too much air being drawn ...


12

manassehkatz covered a lot, but the simple answer is constant air flow The draft will change in the chimney as exhaust vents towards it – especially when going from cold air to hot. A draft hood is placed above the upper most part of the gas furnace to draw air into the chimney and makes it possible to draw more or less air through the chimney as necessary ...


12

You need to drain the water from the heating system, effect the remove and replace, then refill the heating system. Some circulating-water heating systems are filled with tap water from the home's water supply, while others are isolated from the water supply plumbing and are filled with some other liquid. My experience is entirely with the most common tap ...


12

You should remove and replace the valve. If you cannot open it using the lever chances are good that it also will not function properly when needed. So you have a dangerous condition. It looks like you have limited space to work in so you may need to remove the downpipe from the valve before you can remove it. But a new one is cheap insurance vs. a ...


11

Water heaters have a dip tube on the cold water side that puts the cold water into the bottom of the tank. If water pressure is lost on the cold water side, the tank can siphon down through the cold water inlet till it reaches the bottom of the dip tube. Then since there's no water in the tank to absorb heat, the dip tube can melt and the tank can be damaged....


11

There is a reason most countries regulate gas-related equipment strictly, because they don't want buildings to explode. If there is no electricity or gas involved, fix it! If it's under - let's say - 50 Volts, go on! If it's 110-230 V, watch out, but you'll be probably okay. If it can leak gas, and fill up the inside of a building, or kill everyone through ...


10

With a tankless water heater it's all about how many degrees the heater can raise a certain quantity of water. In your situation, you will need a heater to raise the temperature of about 5 gallons per minute (two showers running at once or one shower and another hot water tap running). If you live in the north, and the water out of the tap is be 40 degrees ...


10

The typical way to pre-warm water is to install a standard tank water heater before the tankless, but leave it turned off. Using an automotive radiator is a terrible idea. You don't want to connect something not designed for potable water to your plumbing. That's just asking for trouble. The pex idea is interesting. The only reason that I can think that ...


10

In the UK we have electric showers which heat water on demand - ie they're supplied with 230V using about 9kW, which is enough for a moderate flow of cold water to be heated to about 50C as it flows through the shower. Not only are they directly connected to the shower hose, they're usually inside the shower cubicle - so the unit gets wet and the electrical ...


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