6

The kitchen sink is used for various other purposes than getting a glass of water to drink. So you don't want to be wasting the filter when doing your dishes.


6

What you're most likely looking at is a bacteria called Serratia Marcescens. According to Wikipedia it is commonly found growing in bathrooms (especially on tile grout, shower corners, toilet water line, and basin) as well as many other places. From that source (and others), the best way to get rid of it is regular cleaning by soaking & ...


5

A RO filter filters water by pushing water it through a semi-permeable membrane (think of it as a piece of plastic that can let water (but not much else) slowly ooze through). Normally, if you separate dirty water and clean water with such a membrane, natural forces will cause the clean water to slowly move over to the dirty side. This process is called ...


5

There's a good reason it's "an insane buy" but since you seem to be committed regardless (these things are why you pay an inspector and put conditions in the contract allowing you to walk away if inspection turns up issues...) There's no guarantee that a new well with solve any (much less all) of the issues, unless it ends up in a different water supply (not ...


4

The first thing you should do it check your static (no flow) water pressure and the pressure with water flowing. Find a place where you can attach a pressure gauge and check the pressure with and without flow. You need to find out if this is truly a pressure issue or if the issue is related to restricted flow. Check the static and flow pressure both ...


3

Water filters that remove chemicals and such require significant contact time with the filter media (media is often activated carbon) to be effective. This contact time requirement restricts flow significantly, so much that you would not be able to efficiently perform other common tasks that are normally done in the kitchen sink: rinse/wash dishes, wash ...


3

There are many systems on the market that could make the tap water safe to drink, but there is no one size fits all solution. These systems also range into the tens of thousands of dollars. You would need to get your water tested by an independent lab to determine what the quality is, and then you would need to have a system designed that will fit your needs....


3

It sounds like you have really hard water. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hard_water This means that the water has a lot of dissolved minerals in it. These minerals cannot be removed with a filter and actually tend to clog filters and shower heads. You can buy certain soaps and detergents that claim to work better with hard water but their effect is not as ...


3

...you have some of the best tap water in the country. Either remove it completely, or possibly use a carbon filter cartridge if there's enough chlorine to bother you. If the filter looks off, the filter housing probably needs a good cleaning/sanitizing. Which one (or how many) of the bottled water companies is just bottled NYC tap water?


3

RO systems push water under pressure through a semipermeable membrane to allow the good part of water through and the bad part to stay in the input side and be washed away. Typical systems will operate with an efficiency of 4:1 or 5:1 meaning that four or five gallons of water go into the unit to produce each one gallon of filtered water. The rest of the ...


3

I had the same issue and it turned out to be air in the system. When you install a new filter, it's full of air. I took out the filter, dumped out the water out of the filter, refilled the filter in the sink, and reinstalled the filter. It took a few tries to get all of the air out of the system.


3

Without a picture of under the sink, it's hard to say if your aunt has room for an undersink RO system or how hard it'd be to install (and subsequently, uninstall). Even in the simplest case, with plenty of room and updated plumbing, RO systems need a supply line, a waste line, and a faucet, all of which a plumber would have to connect to the existing ...


3

2 filters in parallel will reduce pressure drop because of the increased area allowing higher flow but the cost of 2 filters , housings etc may be much more than a larger single filter. I have installed filters in parallel in the past but have found it to be cheaper to purchase a larger single filter.


2

According to this document from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), distillation and reverse osmosis are both effective at lowering the fluoride level of drinking water to below 4 mg/L. How will fluoride be removed from my drinking water? The following treatment method(s) have proven to be effective for removing fluoride to below 4.0 mg/L or ...


2

Yes, RO can remove most of the fuoride (according to the mfg specs on my system). Distillation will also remove just about everything -- in either case, you should weigh the benefits of these systems (costly!) vs using a water cooler for drinking water. Deionizers and activated alumina are more obscure filtration systems that you can look into as well.


2

We had the same problem as everyone else. Installed a new filter (not a Samsung filter). After we installed the new filter there was no water. Tried the old one again and same thing, no water. We tried everything and could not figure what the problem was. Finally we unplugged the refrigerator and waited a few minutes. Plugged it back in and voila, we had ...


2

The order you have your filters is the correct order. You don't need to waste money on chlorine filters to have better tasting water in your toilets. If you think you need additional sediment filtration I believe you can find a carbon filter with better sediment filtration to use at each sink. Those housings also take GE brand filters and other filters of ...


2

You have two options which are equally acceptable. Option one is a dual inlet air gap. It provides two inlets - one for dishwasher, and another for a water purification system. Installation is straight forward - you remove the existing air gap and put the new one in its place. You can find such a device here. Your other option is to purchase a faucet for ...


2

The whole house filtration system that you cite is a filter. The specs for this filter suggest that it removes chlorine and pharmaceuticals, so I think it's a carbon filter. It's possibly a good filter (there are variable levels of quality carbon filters) and it sounds like there's a timer that flushes/cleans it (that's convenient) but it is not an RO system....


2

First off you will have to unscrew the end (#1 as you have labeled) it from the faucet riser pipe. This part that you are removing is commonly called the aerator. Then you will have exposed male threads on the faucet pipe. If you are extremely lucky you may find that your water filter with the female threads will screw right onto the end of the faucet pipe. ...


2

You will need two fittings to connect 3/8 tubing to 3/8 compression together. Use Teflon tape between the two fittings to prevent leaks, but don't use any on the compression fitting. Remove and discard the brass compression nut and brass compression ring/sleeve to connect your 3/8 hose. John Guest - Straight Adaptor – Nptf Thread Part No. PI011223S --- ...


2

I think it is understood the because of the force of gravity settling debris to the lowest point, the best orientation would be down. The screen assembly is located in the 'Y' branch.


2

Looks like that water line to the filter is 1/4 tubing. Go to local big box hardware store. int he plumbing section there will be a selection on little bags containing either brass or plastic parts, valves, compression fittings etc. Find either a compression fittingGood) or a push-in valve(Better) for the tubing size. Either way make sure cuts to tubing ...


1

It's a quick connector. Water pressure actually pushes the locking mechanism to hold the tube in. With the pressure completely relieved you can press the grey ring around the blue tube inward and at the same time pull the tube out.


1

Check with the manufacturer. Some have their own Kitchen Scrubby & others don't say anything about it, so you buy very much more frequently. My understanding & experience is that you want to scuff or sand the surface visibly clean. Basically, sand off anything that's been caught, since really nothing gets past the outer most surface. The outer ...


1

Would a sediment filter or carbon/sediment filter be sufficient? There are whole house filters for less than $20. I use 2 on my house. The first one is a bit nicer with a clear cover so I can see the filter and a shutoff valve. The second is the one I have listed below. I use a sediment filter in the first one and a carbon/sediment in the second. ...


1

Some of the problems are quickly fixable at the plant. Others affect only certain homes with lead service piping. I would ask more questions and have your water tested before throwing money at the problem. Because if you don't need it, putting unnecessary filtering on your water will help -1 Flinter, i.e not you, and not some other poor fellow who ...


1

Lead isn't soluble in water (although some lead containing compounds are), so most filtration smaller than ~1 micron is typically quite effective at removing lead. Just look for a filter with a NSF/ANSI Standard 53 rating - it needs a 99% lead reduction to certify (link leads to a specific filter, but does list the qualifying criteria). Other contaminants ...


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