25

Pressure treated wood can handle submersion. Many folks just pack rock around the post, so they are always in water after rain. You should be fine to go ahead and pour your concrete with no worries.


25

Sorry, there is no shortcut here. It's likely damaged well beyond what you can see and the only fix is to tear that all out, remove the drywall that is likely crumbling, replace/repair any studs, check the bottom plate and subfloor for damage, and then restore the entire thing.


23

With the COVID stuff going on the last thing you want to do is have your family have respiratory issues due to mold. There is mold growing behind your shower, probably on every shower wall. Money or time spent on patching this is both fruitless and reckless. That article you linked to is click-bait nonsense - maybe 1 in 1000 showers have a little leak ...


20

Let me tell you a story about insurance companies and how they will screw you. First, before you call your insurance company to report an accident, call them and ask for a policy review to see if your particular loss is covered. If it is not hang up and do not report the loss. Here is what happened to me. I assumed that the loss that I had would be covered ...


17

Pressure-treated lumber is pressure-treated by... wait for it... submersion. It was literally dunked in a vat of liquid. The vat was sealed and pressurized, forcing the liquid to enter the wood. It was then not kiln dried. Your lumber is in roughly the same condition it was in when you purchased it. Also, it would have been just as wet even if there had ...


16

You say you're looking for an expedient fix for the duration of the lockdown? That's pretty simple then. Buy a cheap shower curtain, cut it roughly to the size of the missing tiles, and Duck-tape it over that area. Duck tape (the brand) will comfortably stay waterproof for a few months; other brands could well be equally good. If you plan to renovate the ...


12

My suggestion should make this a whole lot easier all around. Do the demolition on a DIY basis and clear away all the debris. The demolition phase work requires basic skills and simple tools that are not expensive. This will open up the structure of the whole room back to framing, subfloor and ceiling joists. I would say that then you would be ready to ...


10

You need to consider the final selling price you could get for it, if it was fixed up and in great shape. Based on "outdated" ones at $43k, maybe $45k-$50k? So there's a bunch of costs you need to estimate and add up: Initial purchase + real-estate fees Demo/disposal costs Carrying costs × amount of time this will take (interest on money borrowed, ...


9

First off, Don't use thinset on drywall. Use a mastic adhesive because it will be better for the damaged area. After the tiles have been installed, use an epoxy grout for maximum strength. Seal around the tub with a quality silicone caulk. Note: This would not be a normal recommended repair from me but since you stated some parameters, I tried to stick to ...


9

Hang another shower curtain on the back wall with a tension-rod. That will let it continue to dry out and should be cost-effective until you can take it down to the studs and see whether the wood needs to be repaired.


8

I side against those who say retiling the wall is the ONLY way to do this. Nonsense. My quickfix is similar to graham's, but I think a little more durable since even joint mud is generally very absorbant! Now you say the visible drywall is decent shape and not rotted out. If that's so, what you want to do is spray down the lip of the exposed drywall lightly ...


7

I am sure they sell large pans somewhere but that shouldn't be a concern. Your freezer should be contained, in that if there is a power outage and everything melts - the water should stay in your freezer. Note: I have to think if I was putting a deep freezer on my hardwoods I would lay it on an area rug. Even insulated the freezer bottom is pretty cold ...


7

Skirting is purely aesthetic. It doesn't stop damp transmission itself, but just hides a gap where floorboards meet wall. In the article you quoted, the important words are: ...concealing the necessary gap between wooden floorboards and masonry to prevent transmission of damp... They are saying that if wooden floorboards are in contact with masonry ...


7

Those bottom corners are the only problematic locations, right? Referring to Page #7 of these Jeld-Wen installation Instructions which I recently followed. You are missing the foam wedges Go to the millwork desk of your local big box home improvement store and ask if they have any extra they could give you. I'm sure Amazon carries them as well. It looks ...


6

You just want to fix it for the shorter term which makes sense to me. Remove the old dry wall and replace with a piece of 1/2" sheathing making sure that the ends are supported so the tile won't crack there later. Then glue on the tile. This will hold you over as you desire but is not a true fix or longer term solution.


5

Reasonable, except to say that I personally wouldn't be willing to bid the remodel until the repair was done. (Assuming repair by others.) For permit reasons, you wouldn't close in the repairs, so be sure to move that to the remodel phase. One disadvantage to this plan is that you're not building a relationship with any one contractor... that might or ...


5

Interior walls aren't typically insulated. But to be sure you could just drill a small hole (make sure you're not on a stud) and if there is insulation it should come out on the drill bit. But be very cautious if there is plumbing in the area, you don't want to pierce a water line or drain pipe. Other than that, this won't hurt anything since the ceiling ...


5

First, you should let your landlord know ASAP, before the problem gets worse. The ceiling falling down is not your fault. Not reporting it and letting it continue to fall down would be. Anyway, most of what you've mentioned is probably unrelated. Running a small humidifier is perfectly normal. Cockroaches are not heavy enough to pull down a ceiling (...


5

Gregmac's answer is good but just take material costs. Here are your bare bare minimums. 3k drywall + 500 misc drywall. 4k for appliances 2k for demo removal 3k for cabinets and counters - kitchen and bath 3k for flooring 2k misc lumber - subfloors stairs and so forth This is getting the cheapest materials possible and using the cheapest may result in a ...


5

The Building Code requires any structure that looses more than 50% of its value must be brought up to the new current code...it cannot just be replaced to match existing. This includes fire walls between units, electrical systems (including the use of conduit due to the size of the building), sound control between units, required number of parking spaces, ...


5

I tend to answer in practical terms, and not in strictly code-compliant or legal terms. In cases like this, code doesn't really apply since it's old work and you're making improvements. We're only talking two joists, right? That's not so terrible. No, this repair was not done well. Short joist patches only work if they're fastened really well. These aren't. ...


4

Before you attempt to repair it, make sure that the cause of the ice dam has been fixed. You may need to insulate the ceiling, and/or add a styrofoam vent baffle to the inside of the roof to prevent that area from getting too warm. Ice and water shield installed on the roof probably would have also prevented this from happening. The repair will depend on ...


4

Remove the old, rotten wood and replace it with new stuff. This is a very common repair. I've never seen anybody use a jigsaw to remove hardwood strip flooring before but I'm sure it's been done. There's an Ask This Old House episode or two where they tackle this exact project, google it they're good videos, and Tom uses a drill with a 1" spade bit to ...


4

For a 1 time event like a broken waterheater or pipe failure I doubt the studs need to be replaced. A 3% Hydrogen peroxide works better than bleach and dosent stink. All wood has mold spores at the lumber mill we spray the wood after the finish cuts or it will look ugly in a few weeks. The fungicide is only a short term preventive measure, keeping the wood ...


4

Tile over drywall was very common in the 50’s-70’s and is still done today for quick cheap flips. The best way would be to replace the entire wall as matching the grout usually shows a repair, I have saved expensive tile and in my early years on my own homes I saved even cheap tile. One trick if you break a tile or 2 is to make an accent stripe with a ...


4

Cut out the plasterboard that can see and fill with sand and cement them tile it will do for couple years but will not be permanent fic


4

Looks to me like the fittings are soldered, so that would mean copper. Can you gently scrape some of the gray paint off - it already appears to be flaking off in places - and see if the copper color shows?


4

That panel is made of hardboard. A cheap compressed fibre board that is often used for covering or closing areas which may need later access. Usually about 4 to 5mm thick and is often nailed, screwed or glued to a frame. Given the porous nature of the board, then the best course of action is to replace it.


4

What you're missing is entitlements I.E. permission to build. From the government you'll need building permits, and they will have a bunch of requirements - conditions they'll put on your building permit, such as replace the plumbing lateral, install all AFCI breakers, etc. You are also in an HOA district, and the HOA will have a bunch of community ...


4

Looks like a combination of water damage and mold around a sloppy and minimalist tile job, but you should realize that depending on the nature of your relationship to the housing association, "taking matters into your own hands" could have serious financial repercussions (and possible eviction repercussions.) Evidently, the required fix would be to ...


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