25

Pressure treated wood can handle submersion. Many folks just pack rock around the post, so they are always in water after rain. You should be fine to go ahead and pour your concrete with no worries.


17

Pressure-treated lumber is pressure-treated by... wait for it... submersion. It was literally dunked in a vat of liquid. The vat was sealed and pressurized, forcing the liquid to enter the wood. It was then not kiln dried. Your lumber is in roughly the same condition it was in when you purchased it. Also, it would have been just as wet even if there had ...


12

My suggestion should make this a whole lot easier all around. Do the demolition on a DIY basis and clear away all the debris. The demolition phase work requires basic skills and simple tools that are not expensive. This will open up the structure of the whole room back to framing, subfloor and ceiling joists. I would say that then you would be ready to ...


8

This type of damage is very common in situations like yours. Both the wood and masonite are good sources of food for mold to grow if damp or wet for prolonged periods of time. Do not distress, most molds are not extremely dangerous. Since your area is small you can treat it yourself. Remove all obvious mold with a putty knife and wash the area with bleach. ...


7

I am sure they sell large pans somewhere but that shouldn't be a concern. Your freezer should be contained, in that if there is a power outage and everything melts - the water should stay in your freezer. Note: I have to think if I was putting a deep freezer on my hardwoods I would lay it on an area rug. Even insulated the freezer bottom is pretty cold ...


7

Get yourself a moisture meter ($30~) and test the floor at various points. Wood is rarely COMPLETELY dry (as in no moisture at all) - but you definitely want a moisture content that compares to other wood in your house that was not flooded. Example of a moisture meter


5

It is normal to fix the leak by the vent pipe using roofing cement from the outside. It is hard to provide guidance on specific details for your case because we have not seen your vent pipe location and installation technique but here are some things to consider. There is normally a metal, plastic or rubber flashing piece that fits around the vent pipe and ...


5

Reasonable, except to say that I personally wouldn't be willing to bid the remodel until the repair was done. (Assuming repair by others.) For permit reasons, you wouldn't close in the repairs, so be sure to move that to the remodel phase. One disadvantage to this plan is that you're not building a relationship with any one contractor... that might or ...


5

Interior walls aren't typically insulated. But to be sure you could just drill a small hole (make sure you're not on a stud) and if there is insulation it should come out on the drill bit. But be very cautious if there is plumbing in the area, you don't want to pierce a water line or drain pipe. Other than that, this won't hurt anything since the ceiling ...


5

First, you should let your landlord know ASAP, before the problem gets worse. The ceiling falling down is not your fault. Not reporting it and letting it continue to fall down would be. Anyway, most of what you've mentioned is probably unrelated. Running a small humidifier is perfectly normal. Cockroaches are not heavy enough to pull down a ceiling (...


4

The most common approach to dealing with flooded surfaces is to blow air across them. The constantly changing air absorbs moisture. Commercial companies use very high volume fans, but any fan should help. If you can exhaust the air from the room, the moisture level in the air should drop and more water will be absorbed from the floor. Use of a dehumidifier ...


3

There are a few options that can be used to repair this damage. You can use standard joint compound (non-lightweight), and apply it in thin coats to avoid cracking due to shrinking, joint compound mixed with plaster, or professional grade oil based drywall spackle. The first step would be to dry the wall and inspect it for mold. If there is any surface mold ...


3

I'd drive to get anything that was wet replaced. For 100% sure get anything that felt "mushy" replaced. Any wet insulation needs to be replaced too. Any wood that is wet should be allowed to dry up before covering it back over.


3

I had a similar problem in a home I used to own - we pulled up the carpets and found that there were spots where the floor was black underneath. We sanded the floors to remove the varnish, and then used bleach to fix the discoloration in the hardwood floor. It turned out really well. Here are more detailed instructions: http://www.oldhouseweb.com/how-to-...


3

Remove the old, rotten wood and replace it with new stuff. This is a very common repair. I've never seen anybody use a jigsaw to remove hardwood strip flooring before but I'm sure it's been done. There's an Ask This Old House episode or two where they tackle this exact project, google it they're good videos, and Tom uses a drill with a 1" spade bit to ...


3

A few thoughts - more than I can fit in comments but probably not a complete answer. Also a disclaimer that I'm not a pro, I've just had some similar experiences! It looks like the window may have been improperly installed and leaking water may have done more damage than you can see. The top of the frame outside appears to have just been caulk-sealed. Even ...


2

If after drying, you are left with a stain (which you probably will), it is going to require a bit more work if you want to remove the stain. You are going to have to remove the finish above the stain, remove the stain, then refinish the area or re-stain and refinish the area. Mask around the stain Remove the finish covering the stain, sandpaper is fine. ...


2

This part of the foundation is most likely spreading out a roof load from a sizable portion of the sunroom roof. If the soil supporting the foundation has eroded away, this will need to be rectified some time next year. For now, get a bag of ready mix mortar, the kind you just add water to, it has sand and cement already mixed in in the correct proportion. ...


2

I just lived and worked through "sandy" here on the east coast of NJ. The sheet rock was not something we "dried out." We cut it out a few inches above the parts exposed to water all the way around. Depending on the water level we replaced 1', 2', or 4' of sheet rock. In some places floor to ceiling had to be replaced. Either you or the builder should ...


2

A dilute solution of bleach sprayed on it will kill and neutralize the mold. Then wire brush the damaged spot. If you want to prevent this later, seal the plywood with something, primer or polyurethane. (While bleach contains chlorine which is not good for you, the chlorine is volatile and quickly evaporates. It is typically used by brewers to sterilize ...


2

Before you attempt to repair it, make sure that the cause of the ice dam has been fixed. You may need to insulate the ceiling, and/or add a styrofoam vent baffle to the inside of the roof to prevent that area from getting too warm. Ice and water shield installed on the roof probably would have also prevented this from happening. The repair will depend on ...


2

You can use a diamond blade to cut drainage channels. Noisy and messy, but it works. You can (for reasonable sums) either rent a concrete saw or purchase a diamond blade for an angle grinder, as you prefer. You can purchase a concrete saw, of course, but the sums appear unreasonable to me for a one-time project. With such a limited amount of water (no ...


2

Having dirt touching the fence will increase the chance that the bottoms of your rails/pickets will rot. This doesn't necessarily mean your whole fence will rot; only the parts exposed to heavy moisture are at risk. Maybe you're OK with having a bit of rot on the hard-to-see part of the fence after a few years; how bad it is really depends on the wood, how ...


2

These jobs are tricky to bid. We have an "alternative structure" as you put it. The way we work them is usually this First, we bid the known scope items. This could be painting, plumbing, electrical, flooring, etc. This is the stuff that will happen regardless of damage. Next, we bid known repairs and we make a guess as to the extent of the scope if we ...


2

Let it dry for a week or 2 & if nothing's gotten worse & you're not even or barely noticing it with your feet then let it go. Tearing the floor up for a cup or 2 of water that's already gone isn't worth it. If it actually bothers you later you can sand the cupping down & back to flat. You'll have to re-stain & re-polyurethane the area after ...


2

Jeremy, I would strongly suggest you use a Multimeter to measure the water content in your wood flooring, and other materials around the sink. Please view this link to a suggested meter you can purchase, it has prongs so that you may penetrate into the wood with minimum damage and get a reading from the inside, as water can stay contained withing the wood. ...


2

In my area, Masonite siding was extremely popular during the 70's and 80's. They all have met the same fate as what you are experiencing. Your's doesn't look too bad yet, but once it starts, the bubbling and swelling will continue. The only way I know to slow the process is to remove as much loose paint and disintegrated paper material as possible, prime ...


2

It may be mold, but even if it were, you hardly need a professional to help you get rid of it, just spray down the area with bleach and wait a few minutes (not too many though, as that can damage the finish further) to let it do its thing, then (while wearing proper protection, ie rubber gloves, etc) wipe up the area using a cloth and warm water. Then ...


2

You stated this is red oak. Are you sure it isn't engineered flooring with a thin red oak veneer? It looks to have some sort of particle or pressed fiber board under the veneer. Either of the latter is subject to warping via moisture expansion but I don't think that's your situation. I think the fractional expansion of all the boards across the room are ...


2

It sounds and looks like the wax seal has failed. The good news is this repair is not hard. The bad news it is a "dirty job" . Step 1 get a new wax seal at a plumbing or big box store just a couple of bucks. I like the ones with a urathane center they are a bit more expensive but 5 bucks is not a big deal. Also pick up some disposable gloves and a narrow ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible