5

You are correct that having a hot radiator on what's effectively a cold space - the porch - is very inefficient and, presuming nobody's on the porch most of the time, wastes a lot of energy. And you are correct that the hot water going into that radiator is being cooled in the process. However, it is unlikely that the water is going to any other radiators, ...


4

Since this seems to be an ongoing problem for you, I might suggest a somewhat more formal approach to it. For instance, use magnets to attach toweling to the top of the radiator shell and let the duble-thickness of that towelling (magnet inside the fold) drape all the way to the floor - that should basically shut-down air flow through the radiator from top ...


4

Pressure from the cold side is higher than from the hot side, so cold water is backfeeding through the circulator and on to the hot side to the faucets in use. Close the shutoffs you have for the circulator and the problem should go away.


3

Other than looking for hidden bleeders (i.e. I have one where the baseboard cover needs to be removed to reveal the bleeder) and bleeding any bleeders that you can find, you may need to swear at whoever put in the new radiators and retrofit bleeders where they are missing. There is often an automatic bleeder/vent on or just after (in which case it's often ...


3

This is the sound of metal pipes and radiator components expanding and contracting. As they do so, they rub against other fixed parts, like wood framing, brackets, etc. If they stick slightly, you'll hear a popping or clicking sound as they stick and unstick from the friction against this expansion and contraction. So the solution is to locate any points ...


3

The oil boilers I'm familiar with should be inspected and tuned annually. Many newer gas boilers need preventative maintenance only once every two years. I suspect pellet boilers want attention every year, but that is a guess.


3

If you are just checking for leaks, you can pressurize the system with air, and wait to see if the pressure drops. If it drops, there's a leak somewhere.


3

If it's tripping the GFCI it is almost certainly defective. you could ask a second GFCI for a second opinion.


2

When you do your daily bleed of this radiator if you don't actually get air coming out, just water. You don't have an air problem, you have a water flow problem. If your system a diverter-tee system (a "one-pipe" system), check to make sure that the tees that feed this radiator are installed the same way as the tees that feed your working radiators. The ...


2

I have done this to some of my renovations and I was able to do two types of installation. One was to save space in a bathroom with a radiator and the other was to save space in the kitchen just like you stated. I ran the pex (has to be heating PEX with oxygen barior) straight from the supply and back to the return of the existing radiator pipes. I first ...


2

So, nearly a year later I think I've got this solved! It appears that the bypass valve was left almost fully open. This explains a lot. The "path of least resistance" is for the water to use the bypass circuit to return to the boiler instead of going around the radiators, which explains why it was taking forever for the house to heat up. Now, the water ...


2

A very important factor in deciding to use a thermal mass to store energy is the energy source. Solar energy is the classic example. The energy is free and the supply is periodic and unpredictable. Energy storage is a must. You mentioned a boiler, so you likely are burning fuel, directly or indirectly, or at least paying for the supply. In this case, energy ...


2

After checking what type of instant water heater that is - since it's gas-fired, your operating cost will be MUCH lower with gas providing the heat than with electric resistance heat. Perhaps 30% (not 30% less, unless you have remarkably low electric rates and high gas rates) - typically near 30% of the cost of running electric resistance heat, for the same ...


2

Yes. In fact, I had to do this exact same thing in a house in MN that had baseboard copper freeze and burst in an attic. I ended up replacing the cooper between the boiler and the baseboards with PEX. I'd suggest using SharkBite connectors to transition between the copper and PEX. They're designed for that and it's super-easy to install. As Ecnerwal ...


2

From your comment "re-plumbed for code reasons" and the odd behavior you're experiencing, I suspect the hot water circulation system might have been patched/crossed into the cold water system and/or the pump is faulty. For a hot water circulation to work, the hot water pipes must be in a closed system (other than the obvious exit points like a faucet, dish ...


2

In Russia, they just left the windows open. A photo would help. In general your towels or foil are safe to use, the towels will probably work best. You want to block airflow as much as possible, then, once that's good have an insulating layer. Or just a good talk with building maintenance about installing a flow restriction device on your line. A down ...


2

Step zero for the future (you've figured this out by now, but let's state it loud and clear) - extreme cold is when you don't want a setback at all - I shifted my thermostat from its usual automatic to "hold temp" last night (same cold front) for that reason. You can also have a circuit installed that runs the circulator every so often regardless of call for ...


2

Real pricing would depend on the actual type of installation of each system you would choose to install. For example; Hot water systems could be as simple as a series loop system or as costly as a zoned system where every room had it's own thermostat to control the temperature of that area. Simple and cheap would be finned tube baseboard radiation. More ...


2

To me it sounds like an anti scauld valve is not working correctly. If you have a thermometer could you try just turning on the hot and see if the flow almost stops and what the water temp is. This could verify if the valve is the problem.


2

Let's say we're dealing with 70 gallons of water, and we're adding heat just by running a circulation pump to stir the water around. And, let's say the pump is a standard hydronic circulation pump of 100 watts (they actually seem to be a bit less). And, let's say that all of that 100W goes into moving the water about, which then decays into 100W of heat ...


2

Boilers typically have a aquastat, high limit, low limit in one of several configurations. This is an all in one unit specific to oil. www.inspectopedia.com Most aquastats look something like this on the outside www.ebay.com If you have conventional radiators high limit set to 150 max is common, convectors you can go to 180. It's usually best to run ...


2

First, if this is a forced hot-water system with baseboard heating, they're called convectors, not radiators. Bleeding the system is fairly simple (though a bit messy and time-consuming), and, as you diagnosed, the most likely fix. There should be an air bleeder, or purging, valve at the end of each baseboard unit and one in the basement by the boiler, ...


2

Most hot water baseboards have a "flap" which can be used to regulate the heat output so the system can be balanced, since there are often long runs serving multiple rooms. The flap can be opened for maximum airflow and heat delivery, or closed to minimize airflow and heat delivery. If there is no flap, or that is inadequate to resolve the problem, ...


2

If you can't reduce the overheating in that room by any of the ways the other guys suggested, you might want to wrap the heating element with aluminum foil. Start with wrapping about 2 feet see the results and wrap more in 2 feet increments until you achieve the desired room temperature. The foil does not have to be wrapped completely around the element but ...


2

This is really a bad spot to be leaking considering that it's only about 12 years old. It's leaking where an attachment fitting is welded to the tank and with the amount of corrosion around it, a temporary fix isn't a good idea. It's rusted all the way around and it could start leaking a lot more without any warning since there is pressure in those pipes. ...


1

Most hot water baseboard is not radiant to any significant extent - it's a convector (air heater) and most can be adjusted to flow more or less air (resulting in more or less heat) by adjusting "flaps" on the baseboard shell. They can also (especially old setups in place for a long time) be impacted by buildups of hair, lint, dirt, dust-bunnies etc. that ...


1

You need a check valve on all three return lines from the 3rd floor to prevent flow from the second floor loop going through 3rd floor radiators. Follow your diagram from the circulator through the first 2nd floor radiator to the Tee. From the tee water can go "north" to feed the third floor radiator and return to the loop through another 3rd floor ...


1

I do not know if the piping has been corrected however let me make a few comments: you cannot daisy chain cast iron radiators and expect them to work/heat properly. Each radiator must have its own supply and return piping. Also you cannot series connect radiators. As to the radiator being piped backwards it will only affect the operation a small amount and ...


1

I can't say I'm familiar with your setup, but only with big old radiators & baseboards of the same principal & setup. Your problem is no problem in those systems, they are just to circulate water in one direction of a daisy-chain. The only definition of inlet was which side a flow management valve was installed on. But, definitely get the plumber ...


1

You can blow the water out with a purge gas, such as nitrogen, or consider adding glycol to your water system as an anti-freeze. Below is a picture of Propylene Glycol: Pay attention to manufacturers recommendation. Also, by the looks of your pictures, I would have an alkalinity test done on your water. That build up around the joints looks like acid. If ...


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