8

You may be able to use the existing radiator piping to some extent, but a number of other changes will be required: Lower water temperature. Because the radiant heating runs under your entire floor, it is typically run at a temperature similar to a hot summer day (around 85 degrees Fahrenheit). Cast iron radiators are usually run at around 150 degrees F, ...


7

The manifold is used to distribute fluid evenly throughout the system, as well as allowing you to turn on/off zones (for maintenance and whatnot). Without one you may find that some zones get more heat than others, since the flow could vary from zone to zone (depending on the plumbing).


5

You are correct that having a hot radiator on what's effectively a cold space - the porch - is very inefficient and, presuming nobody's on the porch most of the time, wastes a lot of energy. And you are correct that the hot water going into that radiator is being cooled in the process. However, it is unlikely that the water is going to any other radiators, ...


5

The type of plan refers ultimately to the arrangement of the pipes and thus the type and number of valves you have in your system. This page has explanations of all types (Y, S, W and G (not C)). Y Plan is based on a single three way valve that either allows the hot water from the boiler to the heating circuit, hot water circuit or both. With S-Plan: ......


4

As longneck mentions this is a pressure reducing valve and this connection of the domestic cold water to your heating system is called the system make-up. It used to fill the system and to maintain the heating system's pressure. The knob on the top can be turned to adjust the system's pressure and should be done while the system is static. However, a ...


4

I think you need to balance the system; as water will always take the easier option. So when the system first comes on most of the water will go to the radiator with the shortest pipe run, once the thermostat rad valves on that radiator shut down, then the water will find the next easier option. So by turning down the “lockshield“ values (the value ...


4

Pressure from the cold side is higher than from the hot side, so cold water is backfeeding through the circulator and on to the hot side to the faucets in use. Close the shutoffs you have for the circulator and the problem should go away.


3

Other than looking for hidden bleeders (i.e. I have one where the baseboard cover needs to be removed to reveal the bleeder) and bleeding any bleeders that you can find, you may need to swear at whoever put in the new radiators and retrofit bleeders where they are missing. There is often an automatic bleeder/vent on or just after (in which case it's often ...


3

This is the sound of metal pipes and radiator components expanding and contracting. As they do so, they rub against other fixed parts, like wood framing, brackets, etc. If they stick slightly, you'll hear a popping or clicking sound as they stick and unstick from the friction against this expansion and contraction. So the solution is to locate any points ...


3

Here's an attempt at a simplified answer. Your heating system has to get filled with water at some point. In normal operation, it will be re-heating and re-circulating the same water, and have no interaction with your domestic water supply. However, if the heating loop loses water (e.g. if there is a leak, or if it is drained, or if you extend the system) ...


3

So, nearly a year later I think I've got this solved! It appears that the bypass valve was left almost fully open. This explains a lot. The "path of least resistance" is for the water to use the bypass circuit to return to the boiler instead of going around the radiators, which explains why it was taking forever for the house to heat up. Now, the water ...


3

You've bought a programmable thermostat so you can lower the temperature of the house at night, however by doing that you are making it much harder work for the boiler to bring the house back up to temperature. Before your house was at a constant temperature so you boiler would turn on for a bit, off for a bit, on a bit, off a bit over the whole day. Now it ...


3

The looks like a pressure reducing valve. Is there also a shutoff valve on the cold side? There should be, and it should be closed. The connection to the cold water plumbing is used to fill the radiant heating system with water. The pressure reducing valve serves two purposes: 1) it limits the incoming water pressure to the level required by your heating ...


3

Since this seems to be an ongoing problem for you, I might suggest a somewhat more formal approach to it. For instance, use magnets to attach toweling to the top of the radiator shell and let the duble-thickness of that towelling (magnet inside the fold) drape all the way to the floor - that should basically shut-down air flow through the radiator from top ...


3

The oil boilers I'm familiar with should be inspected and tuned annually. Many newer gas boilers need preventative maintenance only once every two years. I suspect pellet boilers want attention every year, but that is a guess.


3

If you are just checking for leaks, you can pressurize the system with air, and wait to see if the pressure drops. If it drops, there's a leak somewhere.


2

I gave in and had a plumber come this AM. He said it was the control module which was broken, and he replaced it.


2

When you do your daily bleed of this radiator if you don't actually get air coming out, just water. You don't have an air problem, you have a water flow problem. If your system a diverter-tee system (a "one-pipe" system), check to make sure that the tees that feed this radiator are installed the same way as the tees that feed your working radiators. The ...


2

To help you compare, I'm in NY and my 2400 sqft home takes approx. 30-60 minutes to reach 20C (68F) when outdoors its 4C (40F). My house was built in 1960, but the windows are double-pane and were replaced ~8 years ago. The roof was replaced at the same time. I'm far from an expert, but I would suggest getting a different professional to take a look. Here ...


2

A very important factor in deciding to use a thermal mass to store energy is the energy source. Solar energy is the classic example. The energy is free and the supply is periodic and unpredictable. Energy storage is a must. You mentioned a boiler, so you likely are burning fuel, directly or indirectly, or at least paying for the supply. In this case, energy ...


2

After checking what type of instant water heater that is - since it's gas-fired, your operating cost will be MUCH lower with gas providing the heat than with electric resistance heat. Perhaps 30% (not 30% less, unless you have remarkably low electric rates and high gas rates) - typically near 30% of the cost of running electric resistance heat, for the same ...


2

Yes. In fact, I had to do this exact same thing in a house in MN that had baseboard copper freeze and burst in an attic. I ended up replacing the cooper between the boiler and the baseboards with PEX. I'd suggest using SharkBite connectors to transition between the copper and PEX. They're designed for that and it's super-easy to install. As Ecnerwal ...


2

In Russia, they just left the windows open. A photo would help. In general your towels or foil are safe to use, the towels will probably work best. You want to block airflow as much as possible, then, once that's good have an insulating layer. Or just a good talk with building maintenance about installing a flow restriction device on your line. A down ...


2

Step zero for the future (you've figured this out by now, but let's state it loud and clear) - extreme cold is when you don't want a setback at all - I shifted my thermostat from its usual automatic to "hold temp" last night (same cold front) for that reason. You can also have a circuit installed that runs the circulator every so often regardless of call for ...


2

Real pricing would depend on the actual type of installation of each system you would choose to install. For example; Hot water systems could be as simple as a series loop system or as costly as a zoned system where every room had it's own thermostat to control the temperature of that area. Simple and cheap would be finned tube baseboard radiation. More ...


2

To me it sounds like an anti scauld valve is not working correctly. If you have a thermometer could you try just turning on the hot and see if the flow almost stops and what the water temp is. This could verify if the valve is the problem.


2

Let's say we're dealing with 70 gallons of water, and we're adding heat just by running a circulation pump to stir the water around. And, let's say the pump is a standard hydronic circulation pump of 100 watts (they actually seem to be a bit less). And, let's say that all of that 100W goes into moving the water about, which then decays into 100W of heat ...


2

Boilers typically have a aquastat, high limit, low limit in one of several configurations. This is an all in one unit specific to oil. www.inspectopedia.com Most aquastats look something like this on the outside www.ebay.com If you have conventional radiators high limit set to 150 max is common, convectors you can go to 180. It's usually best to run ...


1

Your choice of radiant heat is the best, no matter where you put it, albeit it will not be the most efficient under your floors as a retro fit. The way radiant works is just that, radiant. Extremely different than forced air, where warm air is blowing out of ducts, dramatically changing the humidity. If warm air was blowing under your floor, yes they may ...


1

Alternative solution: use an underfloor heating type which goes over your existing floor. Polyplumb do one called Overlay, which was what we had installed. 18mm thick panels are laid on the floor, which have grooves for the pipes to run in. Obviously you're either a) going to need to put this in every room downstairs, or b) have a level difference between ...


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