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14

The "rings" you mention are commonly called "washers". It's hard to tell from the photo, but I believe the "incomplete ring" you mention is a "split" or "spring" lock washer: If that's the case, then the are stacked as you have them in your second picture, the flat washer against the bracket, then the lock washer on top of that. Note that this assumes ...


12

Effective June 29, 2015, all GFCI receptacles and circuit breakers must have an auto-monitoring (self-test) feature that automatically conducts a periodic internal test to confirm that the GFCI is able respond to a ground fault. If a problem is detected, the GFCI must trip and deny power or provide a visual and/or audible indication. Green Status Dual ...


11

That is a toothed or pronged "torque washer". As you suspect, it's intended to prevent a carriage bolt from turning in soft wood.


10

Bearings tend to wear out as a result of repeated cyclical loads. As a rule of thumb, based on fatigue failure of metals: The damage done by a single cycle of a load is proportional to the load raised to the power of 3 or 3.3. When the total of the damage done reaches some threshold, the part will fail. The threshold cannot quite be predicted in advance. ...


6

You should use them to avoid not having any means of recompense from the shipper, or from the manufacturer by voiding the warranty. If you didn't save yours, replacement shipping bolts can be obtained from most appliance parts suppliers (the label with your model number is probably behind the door). I would not be concerned, if you're the one carefully ...


6

That may very well be a washer tub restraint device. The tub in a washer machine is often mounted in a way that takes up vibration during normal operation. During shipping from the factory additional items are added to the washer to restrain motion in the tub to prevent knocking around and/or damage. This cable hook device could be one of those restraint ...


5

Any size you like so long as you are not overloading the machine. Limit the loads to the size the machine is designed for, but don't engage in only running the smallest possible load for no good reason; this isn't a good reason. But don't load 20 lbs of clothes if the manual says 15 is the limit. That being said, smaller load with more rotations suits most ...


5

After spending several hours researching, there still appears to be little consensus on this topic. But here is a summary of potential solutions. The Problem But first, the problem: the issue with High Efficiency Front loaders is that the vibrations are vertical. The drum spins horizontally so the vibration is all in an up-and-down motion. It's also ...


5

The spikey washer needs to go between pieces of wood. I doubt its usefulness, since the strength is either going to come from the bolt in shear, or friction between the wood surfaces, depending on how tightly it's bolted. The teeth won't fix poor clamping. A lockwasher needs a lot of compression to function properly, it's really intended for metal. If ...


4

It might be a restraint to prevent a stacked washer/dryer combo from toppling in the event of an earthquake or a child climbing it - in that case it would have on end bolted into a stud, and the other would connect to the higher device (usually the dryer) in the stack. If not stacked, not needed. On the other hand, if the hooked end is greasy, @Michael ...


4

Unless you have a written local amendment disallowing it there is no reason this would be unsafe or prohibited. I have seen and worked on many, many basements that fit this exact description. My only concern would be keeping the area clear of lint from the dryer.


4

Looks like you hit the pros and cons of the washer tray pretty well :-) Couple of things I'd consider: Since the room is tile and concrete, is there a drain in the floor? If so, adding a washer tray is rather unnecessary and I'd leave it out, just ensure that the floor and tile are properly sealed. (I have seen washer trays that pretty much are the same ...


3

Check the temperature of the main home water supply pipe, and compare it to other pipes in the house. Nothing else will be colder, but the other cold water pipes shouldn't be much warmer. If you find a presumed cold water pipe that's significantly warmer than the main supply, then you can search for the source of the heat. If, for instance, the washing ...


3

Yes, as @TomG says, take the standpipe up - but I'll modify 18" to "as far as the ceiling or the 8 foot limit allows", that's the least expensive first approach, and if it solves it, you are done. Get it right up inbetween the floor joists. If a plumber was involved in the black Tee on the white PVC pipe at the top of the picture, the licensing board should ...


3

This is sort of a modification of what @FreeMan said, but what I would suggest is you get bolts with flat washers, where the flat washer is less than 20mm diameter so it will fit through the hole. The head of the bolt will need to be smaller than the flat washer (obviously). You will need six pieces total per mounting bolt, including the bolt itself. Put ...


3

You originally had an Asko washer/dryer matched set. This wasn't just style. The Asko washer plugged into the Asko dryer, which provided a special NEMA 6-20 receptacle on the back, specifically for an Asko washer. Why? The set is designed for high-density condos/apartments, to minimize utility hookups (no hot water, no dryer vent, no separate washer power)....


3

"Picturing" that the screw goes into a deep thingy, I'm voting for the second shot & indeed the washers stack. The hole in the bracket looks pretty big & too big for the smaller washer, but I'm also imagining the screw head would go on the other side.


3

It's not going to be that simple. Unless you support the pipe above where you want to put the rubber boot, it's likely going to come crashing down. Depending on what's above, you might be better off cutting the cast iron where you want, and replacing everything above the cut with PVC/ABS. Without knowing more about what's above this, and what else ties into ...


3

According to the National Electrical Code, yes it should be a 20 ampere branch circuit. This circuit should also not have any other outlets, other than the ones for "laundry equipment". So keep the 15 ampere circuit for your general use receptacles, and run a new 20 ampere circuit for the "laundry equipment". Also note that the receptacles in the laundry ...


3

Some builders ( mostly in large city complexes) provide limited space or delete some of the utility hook-ups to save money on construction, forcing you to use more exotic washer/dryers. You don't have that problem; all the usual utilities are there. To the left we see hookups for a common washing machine. You have hot and cold water supply spigots; a ...


3

Take a look at the lid switch. On some machines, the lid switch only interrupts the spin cycle. But it may be required to be closed for everything on this machine. The lid switch can fail with little or no warning and should, ideally, fail open rather than closed.


2

Find a bolt with a similarly sized and shaped head that can go in through the hole, then turn 90°. Tighten it in place with a washer and bolt on the inside of the van to lock the bolt to the van. Everything else then bolts to these. If you can't find suitably shaped, oval headed bolts, a 30mm round bolt head or a smaller bolt plus a washer could be ground ...


2

If this is a custom (read home made) set up the way it is typically done is to attach either furring strips or 3/4" panels to the ribs or frame supports. Use self tapping sheet metal screws to attach the wood to the walls. Then use what ever fastener is appropriate to anchor the shelves to the wood. After reading you comments, can you drill a pair of ...


2

If you could find them with a head size that's just right, you could use something like toilet flange bolts. Where the head of the bolt is ovular, and could be turned once in the hole.


2

Maybe, but probably not. Electrical Most electric dryers are designed to be connected to a 30 ampere branch circuit, using a NEMA 14-30 plug. While most electric ranges are designed to work with a 50 ampere branch circuit, using a NEMA 14-50 plug. Since the two devices likely use different plug configurations, it's not going to be as simple as just ...


2

There is a plug below the floor drain. This is why when the washer drains it backs up. Soon it will start backing up when you take a bath. The reason it got worse is the land lord knocked more debris into the plug and it is draining even more slowly. A long power snake is the best way to clean these problems as it will get worse with time, drain cleaner may ...


2

Nuts and bolts start with two options, US or metric. US units tend to be in inches, metric units are typically millimeters. The size of the socket is completely separate from the size of the bolt and nut. The size of the nut/bolt is measured outside of the threads on the bolt, not the nut. So a 15mm bolt measured from the diameter from outside the threads, ...


2

You cannot do what you propose. You cannot run the washer on the 30A circuit of the dryer. If you now have a 20A/240V circuit, as long as it is dedicated to the washer, you can easily convert it to 20A/120V, if that's what you need. I am a bit confused as to what you have and what you need. Either way, it sounds like you have what will work, but there is a ...


2

Those are called washers. The 'c shaped one' is a split washer (we refer to it as a lock washer) and the complete one is just a regular washer (flat washer). They go on the thread end of the screw, inside of the material, so... Screw head (Hole in material) Lock washer Flat washer Nut The lock washer is used to basically press into the material to grip ...


2

Aerator Assembly (source) They're all pretty standard. You should be able to find one at your local hardware store. Or, buy a faucet aerator assembly on Google.


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