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1

An exterior wall is almost certainly load bearing in any standard-design home structure. So yes, you will need to compensate for that if you are opening up a section of the wall. Considering that you intend to have an opening (14') in a 17' wall, which comes to more than 80% of the wall's length, the beam is going to have to carry nearly the entire load, ...


2

Unless the directions state that the use of a pencil is the proper way to operate the switch, you should replace it. The rattling sound would also be a reason for replacement. Don't chance it arcing because the internal contacts aren't connecting right. Take some pictures of the switch before disconnecting any wires. That way we can better assist you if you ...


1

You can poke a hole in the wall and push the cable through the hole , no box is required (this is how a cable company will do it), I usually use a low voltage ring like a wbf-1 this provides a way to mount a cover plate. Make sure to seal the entry cable and hole with a quality silicone sealer. Your needs for a TV cable box depends on what you have ...


3

Yes you can glue the backer to the wall. No matter what you do if the wall shifts there will be issues. Most the time if there is concrete I do not use backer unless there will be a large difference in surface height.


0

if the walls are close to the steps they could support the treads directly. the steps could be hollow underneath instead of gravel fill. alternatively mix some cement with that gravel fill it'll stand up on its own then.


2

I have built many vertical retaining walls. Drainage is the first concern then the height. Code may require rails over several feet (in my area 3' is the max). You did not specify the number of steps or the rise (if more than 3' even with drainage usually reinforcements are required). With some walls this is drilled holes that are pinned together. Some are ...


3

Mold requires two things: Organic matter (i.e. food) Water You prevent mold by eliminating one or both of these. In many cases the food is the building materials themselves, wood, paper, some paints, etc. So you have to focus on the water or moisture that is allowing the mold to take hold and grow. A diluted bleach solution is useful for cleaning up but ...


0

" What could cause this? " My guess would be the furnace was turned off and the house got cold....real cold. Then someone turned the heat back on and the flow of warm air caused materials to expand around the vents. Too bad they didn't reheat the house slowly and incrementally (assuming my theory is correct) and avoided the problem.


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That probably happened in the 1950s, not long after the house was built, especially if you have wood lath and not gypsum panels. The corners of the cutout for the vent create weakness, and normal seasonal house movement results in cracks. Rub some painter's caulk in there before you paint. Doing more than than will probably just make it look worse unless ...


-1

The amount of air flow to any room is based on “heat loss” or “heat gain”. You do not want the same size registers In both your bedroom and closet. One room will over heat or over cool. If the bedroom is on a corner of the house and has windows, it will have significantly more heat loss and/or heat gain. I live in a moist environment, so a little air ...


0

You want to make a closet in your master bedroom , to me that is a non load bearing wall(s). This won’t be hard you just cut the bottom plate where the vent hits and move it up a foot or so. Then a wall register on each side provides the same amount of heat or possible slightly more flow because of less restriction. I put vents in large closets to help keep ...


1

That's only really true where wiring passes through studs (and fastener penetration is likely). Because no one should be mounting anything to those recessed straps, I doubt it's a concern. I'd run the vertical wires in the middle of the stud space and move on. The obvious alternative is to use EMT (metal pipe). Here's a discussion that seems to address ...


0

With your joist direction following the same without support it is probably built for a door. With a door and no header the wall may wobble a bit as many shower doors are glass and heavy. I was taught to always put a header in for a door for that reason. If you are not going to have a door and want it open to the ceiling I would do it. Depending on the depth ...


0

Before cutting anything that may be "load bearing" I would have it looked at by a structural engineer to be sure. You do not want to create a problem that you can't easily fix. If there is a problem with your idea or project, he can tell you how to proceed. my 2 cents


1

We don’t design for what’s normal. We design for the unusual. Just because you don’t have wind storms too often, doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take precautions for high winds. Structural shear walls are usually at the exterior (perimeter) of the house. However, perimeter shear walls can only resist a certain amount. If the house is more than 3:1 length ...


0

Turns out that there is a vapour barrier UNDER the slab, which so far has held up fine.


3

From what I can see in those images, I wouldn't bother repairing that drywall until the new door is in. Sometimes hanging/fitting a door requires a lot of work to get it plumb, straight, and level, and that may cause you to damage what you just repaired. Once the new door is installed, you can see how the wall will need to be repaired relative to the new ...


0

The slope has to go the other direction The slope must be away from your house for some reasonable distance. Otherwise tarpaulins will do nothing at all. If the slope is away from the house, then yes, the tarps will help a lot. Water flows downhill. If you think otherwise, that might explain why they are calling you a nutter ;) Every building code ...


1

If each side of the bar has 2 anchor points I would use the metal sleeve anchors on the top and the plastic ones on bottom. The pullout force is greater on the top position. The bottom is mostly shear force so the plastic would be better on the bottom in a concrete or block wall.


3

Those are 2 different types of wall anchors. The blue ones are generally drywall anchors. You drill a hole just large enough for the blue plastic sleeve to press-fit in. Usually, you'll need a hammer to gently bang it in the final 1/4" (2-3 mm) - it should be that tight. You would then line up the mounting hole of the thing to be hung over the center of ...


1

Those look like two different kinds of anchors. One for masonry (self-contained with metal sleeve), and the other for drywall (blue sleeves and lag screws). You'll select the appropriate anchor for the surface you're mounting to and drill an appropriate sized hole. For masonry, you'll insert the entire thing through whatever you're mounting (some type of ...


2

Since you will be putting water and flowers in them you will need to be able to take them down and clean them. I would make some kind of wire cage to hold them, use some malleable wire and cover with chicken wire or ??, mount the cage on the wall and then place the jar inside. Or ( My choice ) buy something like these light protectors and mount them on ...


3

Perhaps a hose clamp: Find one large enough to fit around the jar (bigger is better). Being mindful of how the clamp closes so you don't interfere with that operation, you could use a small screw through the slats of the clamp into the wall or a board. Depending on what you're trying to do, you could attach the jar and ring assembly to a nice piece of ...


1

Try outside on a piece of wood or somesuch, that practise makes so much difference to the real thing... As for the floor, put down plastic sheet, taped down to cover the edges, and that will protect the surface. Works well for any painting, decorating or other work. But if it is a carpet, then the first thing I usually do is to roll the carpet back out the ...


1

If you are considering an air powered nailer, the nail will just fold up when it hits the concrete. Powder actuated guns will not treat the base well at all, at least from my experiences. You may be able to find case hardened 4D (1 1/2") finish nails. They will go in the concrete but it will take accurate striking with the hammer. I have seen and used them. ...


0

You'd really be going for overkill doing that and you'd probably dent the heck out of the baseboard. Try a fast setting construction adhesive like Loctite PL Premium fast grab. It fits into a standard caulking gun. I've used it many times and it works great.


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