New answers tagged

2

You should get a permit to do this and the permitting authority will tell you what you can and cannot do. Even if the structure is sound and up to code as a carport, if you fill in walls this would change the wind loading. Contact building inspection.


0

As the wall you're building is not structural notching is an acceptable solution. An alternative would be to use scraps of thin (eg 1/2") wood as spacers to separate the top plate and the studs from the existing structure. I like engineered wood like MDF, OSB, and plywood for this because it doesn't split when you nail through it.


2

I did the same thing, used procion fabric dye as a colorant. I added hot water to form a liquid and it colored the paint very well however when I had to paint over it, not a single water based color blocking primer worked. 8 coats later I finally resorted to the oil based Kilz with the gold label, the one that off gasses so violently that I had to wear a ...


0

Depending on how permanent you want it to be and the surface you want to fix it to, a backboard and or adhesive would do the trick. For less permanent options, build either large or many mirror clips out of some similar wood or pre-set a backboard of the same size and drill and countersink nice screws through the edge of the frame where there is no glass. ...


1

I always use diluted muriatic acid to remove rust stains from masonry, but it's a dangerous chemical that can cause burns, blindness and lung injury if misused. It's also known as hydrochloric acid. There is a product called Bar Keeper's Friend that looks like scouring powder, but it contains oxalic acid, which removes rust stains and is not as dangerous as ...


0

You might have to use one of these drop-in anchors with an embed sucket. Enlarge the existing hole, if it is smaller than the sucket, and install the sucket with recommended adhesive. If the existing hole is larger than the sucket, clean the hole and fill it with mortar paste and the sucket. Do not install the curtain rod holder until the adhesive/mortar has ...


0

There is no problem with multiple coats of stain blocking paint sealers. When I use these I coat the entire wall, just sealing a small area can create the look of a stain in that area when the covering color paint is used. I use zinsser and kilzs fairly often and I am sure any other shellac type paint or stain blocker would or should be applied or need the ...


0

I do this with new drywall. It holds better and is easier to mud. (as compared to doing more screws further apart)


1

It depends on the wall construction material. If it is block construction, it may just be that your drill/drill bit are not of the correct strength. You'll need a masonary bit and a hammer drill.


6

My guess: The drywaller (novice) sank the screws too deep and broke the paper; yes, all of them! Their boss/inspector came by and told them it's not acceptable The drywaller had to re-screw their work Putting in a new screw close to the original screw is an easy way to make sure they hit a stud


0

To hide the DVR box itself, some of them come with VESA mounts and will mount to the back of the TV/the TV mount. I've also seen frames that will mount to the TV mount, then translate the mount points to the other side of the frame. You then slip the DVR (or other device) into the frame. As noted in the comments, an IR extender will work nicely to get the ...


2

This is what you'll want to do (making allowances for your particular dimensions and geometry): ...and it's just my (unsolicited) two cents, but you might consider putting the door closer to the corner (at the left in your photo, where the ladder is) so that people wouldn't walk into the bathroom and directly into the toilet. (I don't seem to be able to ...


27

Like others have said in comments, drywall was commonly nailed in pairs to help prevent punch-through--hammers had a tendency to crush the drywall and weaken the hold of the nail. When screws were first adopted the practice was continued until it was known that precisely set flute-head screws hold better than nail heads, or until old-timers retired away. Fun ...


2

The strategy of adding a header to replace one or more studs is appropriate, with one caveat: The header must be adequate to carry the load of the floor above as well as any roof that's bearing at that point, if those currently rest on that wall. The header must rest on "trimmer" studs, which aren't shown in your diagram, whether it's load-bearing ...


0

Ikea, and other providers, have no clue as to what wall their bookcases (and other furniture) might be destined for. Several different constructions come to mind, each needing a different screw/fixing for the bracket. They could furnish all kinds of fixings, but then some customers would use an inappropriate one, and there could be legals involved. Much ...


0

The obvious answer is that they sometimes don't include them by default because not everybody needs them, so omitting them would reduce cost (and waste). The premise of "why don't they come with wall mounting screws included?" isn't true; sometimes they do. If they don't, you can ask IKEA for wall mounting screws, which they will provide for free.


0

May not suit code, but a piece of plywood 3" wider than the stud spacing and 3" taller than the opening you cut in the drywall between studs will make an access panel (distinct from "door" in that no hinges, screw/unscrew to use, suitable for infrequent use only.) Code may require a minimum size and the space between studs may not meet ...


4

If the TV weighs less than or equal to what the mount is rated for, it should be fine. However. You could upgrade to a sturdier mount rated for yet more weight, (increasing the safety factor) and perhaps of a more robust design (i.e., mounts with two sets of arms holding the TV, rather than a single arm) if it would provide "worried parent peace of mind&...


1

To answer the screw portion of your question: A 1/2" screw in a 3/4" maple ledger can withstand a withdrawal force of 216 lbs. See below for the calculation. With a 1:1 cantilever bracket, that same number would apply to the vertical load of the weights. You need to budget for dynamic forces too, as you'll likely apply perhaps 4x the force when ...


3

They sell spring loaded access panels up to about 24"x24" (see picture below). If that's big enough that will be the simplest option. Simply cut a hole smaller than the panel and you are done. To cut a hole you have lots of options. The right option is probably a dry wall saw or similar but if you have one an old steak knife will do. When you cut ...


1

If the tyres are blown out then its sitting on the rims, damaging them and whatever hard surface it is resting on. You should purchase a pair of axle-stands per axle on the vehicle. The stands should be of sufficient capacity to support the whole vehicle when finished. Lift the vehicle onto the stands by using a vehicle jack. Two stands per axle, so you ...


5

I would use a T-nut on the back. If you are using softwood, you can usually pull the nut flush by tightening hard. With hardwood this probably won't work, instead, counterbore with a Forstner bit just enough so the nut is flush. With this method, the wood will be almost full thickness and you can re-tighten from the front if necessary. The T-Nuts that you ...


4

I'd recommend a prehung knee-wall door. A prehung door is already on hinges in a door frame. A small 24 x 48 door would be very manageable. You can buy them online in various sizes. I understand you're not an experienced handyman but a small pre hung door would be a fairly easy installation for you and since the door is hidden , if it's not aesthetically ...


0

Shouldn't the goal for wood longevity also extend to the furring strips? I say Yes. Rip some furring strips from the T&G and your golden. If not, why not and how long would pine furring strip last under those conditions? Unanswerable, But negated by my answer to - Shouldn't the goal for wood longevity also extend to the furring strips?


63

From the linked assembly instructions: Screw(s) and plug(s) for the wall are not included. Assess the suitability of the wall to ensure that it will withstand the forces generated. Use screw(s) and plug(s) suitable for your walls and the intended load. If you are uncertain, seek professional advice. Read and follow each step of the instruction carefully If ...


16

While they are 100% sure what type and size of fastener is required for assembling the product, they have no control over the type of wall/support you are installing/fastening the product to (concrete, masonry, wood..etc). It may have recommendation in the instruction sheet, with the type and size indicated for varies types of support medium, and indicating ...


0

We had or tornado swirl around our home the other night. The next day we noticed white powder on at least four of our exterior walls where it looks like the pressure from the wind pushed drywall dust out from under the baseboards onto the wood floor


0

You shall provide the vertical supports as close as practical to shorten the overhanging length of the bottom ties. You should consider to provide braces in both directions (the sketches showing brace in one direction only) to better stabilize the supports. Do not forget to provide adequate safety factor in load calculations.


7

Paint will not fill the depression or smooth out the transition. I recommend filling the depression with joint compound, no tape needed. It may take a few passes to fill it nicely, but with thin layers it will not take too long before you can apply additional coats of compound. You probably do not need to fill the entire depression, just feather the ...


0

This wall is illegal for two reasons: 1) exceeds maximum height allowed by code, and 2) too narrow for minimum insulation required by code. The maximum height allowed by code is 10’ without lateral bracing or without structural analysis that accompany the drawings. (See ICC Table R602.3(5) ) The Energy Code requires a 2x6 stud in order to provide adequate ...


2

You could have hit a knot in the wood. These screw tip bits might not be able to pull through without additional force, which you cannot apply with a flex bit. Try a different drill spot from the same entry point, 3 to 4in over sideways. If it were a nail or a plate you'd hit hard and possibly jam, but likely not heat-up. I did a similar hole with a straight ...


1

If the wall is rectangular and not trapezoidal, it is typically built on the floor (trapezoidal is too, but a slightly different process). The header for the window is either sized by the engineer or it will be listed in the code book. When the wall is finished assembled is is taken to the layout line on the floor where it is to be permanently located and ...


2

The hot melt glue might work but I think there's an easier alternative. I would try clear silicone adhesive / sealant caulk for this, it's cheap and you know it's weather proof. I have extensive unintentional experience with silicone adhesive and fabric. I have noticed that when I get a spec of silicone on my clothes, it's pretty much permanent, you can ...


2

Consider using a double-sided clear mounting tape. 3M makes one with a clear but rubbery and flexible carrier that makes an extremely strong bond. Since it sticks immediately, you don't have to spend time holding it. Remember that tapes of this type have a bond strength that improves greatly over the first 24 hours, so if you do a small area as a test, give ...


0

I mounted an articulated (Down & Out) bracket on the SIP wall over my fireplace. The TV is an 80” Vizio with a big sound bar so over 120 pounds — more than the bracket provider recommended. I was lucky because there is a chimney box outside the SIP wall with a couple of feet of enclosed space but I was concerned that simple bolts might pull out of the ...


1

It is hard to tell but I think you have lath and plaster. If that is the case then you break away the loose plaster exposing the lath (thin wood boards). Once you have the lath exposed you use concrete fill ( a fiberglass re-inforced setting compound ) to get to the same vertical plane as the wall. Typically you'll have a rough area at this point and you ...


2

I typically use confill ( concrete fill which is a setting compound with fiberglass fibers in it ) to repair plaster as my large gap and then put a sandable top coat like a 30 minute setting compound. How hard is it to skim coat a wall? You could learn. YouTube is amazing. Start with a small wall. You'll have to worry about putting extensions on ...


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