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You may be helped out by getting a bit extension, it sounds like you have standard tools, I currently live in a 30’ farm house, drilling to put a new sub in took close to 18” I had a son make measurements and thought 12 would be more than enough, ended up adding a set screw bit extension as I had to drill down in this case inside a cabinet . We got the ...


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I’m a 6th generation plaster and we have used this product to skim ten of thousands feet of walls over the last 30 years I’ve been doing it and I no of not one time we ever had a issue. But I just read the bag and it does say that it’s not for skimming! ?????


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That's not the wall, exactly, but the stucco finish on the wall. I think I see the brick or block sub-structure behind it. If that's the case, the stucco is not supposed to go into the ground. It's an above-grade finish, like most siding would be. Drainage away from the building is handled by proper grading (slope, surface material) and rain gutters, among ...


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It looks like this wall was not properly primed before it was painted. The paint job is showing what is usually called flashing: delineated areas of the surface where the texture or appearance does not match the surrounding paint. It appears you have a medium gloss paint. Unfortunately, gloss amplifies every little imperfection in the underlying surface and ...


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Cracks are a sign of movement. Movement from 1) a settling foundation, 2) shifting soil, 3) structural wall movement. 1) Obviously, if the foundation is setting the wall will settle. I’d look around the perimeter at the concrete stem walls to see if there are any cracks in the concrete. You should look around the perimeter from inside the crawl space too. ...


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If its a concrete block home it could be the rebar used to tie the roof to the foundation or a tie strap. Then again I have dropped an entire saw into a wall and had to leave it because I couldn't get it out. Someone could have also run a ground or bonding strap depending on the construction. It up to you on whether or not to cut it without looking at the ...


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1/4" thick plywood is light and strong. Like the previous post says, be sure to paint both sides, so that it does not warp. Various kinds of mounting would work. My favorite would be to have a notched holder at the bottom, and then a screw-in to the upper two corners. You could get a long piece of trim as the bottom piece. The top is done with either ...


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You can get "blackout" (almost-blackout) stuff much cheaper than you mention in the comments. Ikea used to be good but since they switched to only selling spring-roller blinds I wouldn't buy another from them. The fabric is completely blacked out but light can get round the edges. If that's still an issue then it's not hard to make a frame that closes up ...


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The wild and crazy, "probably-more-work-than-it's-worth" idea is to make solid shutters that fold to the sides of the windows when you want light+circulation. But, it appears that you already have the plywood. And, you want the projection area to exceed the dimensions of the plywood, so it really should be flush mounted with the wall and have as little gap ...


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Sometimes a concrete wall will not have full-depth studs on it. Instead it will have thin (sometimes only 3/4") firing strips attached to the concrete and the wallboard or paneling gets attached to those strips. If you are using long screws, chances are good that you are just hitting the concrete. One way to test this would be to drill a small hole where ...


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Your biggest problem isn't retaining the plywood, it's how not to damage the window or walls. Cut the plywood accurately to the window aperture minus 1/4" each side, and then stick pipe insulation all the way along each side (including corners!) to cushion the edges. This also makes the plywood sheet an interference fit to the window aperture, which means ...


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Generally, hitting a hard thing means STOP There's a convention that says you can safely use 1-1/2" nails or screws without having to worry about nicking an electrical wire, water or sewer line. Where one of those comes within 1-5/8" of the finished wall surface, there is supposed to be a metal plate guarding it. Precisely to warn hole-drillers like ...


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If you're not too attached to your current design, consider getting a pull-down projector screen (example). They hide away almost completely when not in use, and you can install it without permanently attaching anything to your window frames. They also have reflective properties that make your pictures look better than a normal painted-white surface would. ...


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Cut a sheet of wood into the dimensions of your window. Screw in L brackets in the four corners of the wall where you want to put the wood. Then just like a picture frame you install four rotating pegs to hold the board in place while you watch the movie. Depending on your budget, you could also install magnets on the back of your board to hold it in place ...


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It looks like there is a layer of foam between the siding and the house this was quite common. I would not seal below the siding, this could trap moisture and since there is a layer of foam attached to the sheeting there really shouldn’t be any air movement and this is outside the structure, the stud bays them selves are another air space beyond that. I ...


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I have had great success using a 4x8 foot sheet of white foam board. It is extremely light weight. I hung it from ceiling on strings attached to three binder clips or bull dog clips like show below. When not in use find a place you can store it flat. If it gets broken it’s cheap to replace. If it falls on a child no one gets hurt. The white foam is a good ...


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You need to know how fresh the paint on that wall is and what the sheen of the paint is (matte, satin, semigloss, etc). Paint that is glossy and less that.. 6 months old will tend to still stick to things that are hung on the wall (I made up that time frame, but feels right to me). Even matte paint can have this issue, but it's far less likely. A good ...


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That's exactly what happens when painting over remnant wallpaper paste. Or, if a white glue was used on a wall repair. The only remedy is to scrape the offensive stuff off, wipe several times with a wet sponge...until no longer slippery and re-prime/paint. A skin-thin application of Spackle/plasterboard compound can restore the scraped areas to paint ...


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You can size the beam with a basic load calculator (that's what the lumber yard did). One example is bc-calc (www.bccalc.com). Don't just assume that any applicable load has to come from the roof. The ceiling joist weren't designed to handle the ceiling's weight (service personnel, joist, flooring, wall board, insulation, HVAC, electrical, fasteners, paint, ...


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