6

Please yes! I am literally 90% done doing a complete remodel of my house. Other than the aluminum wiring that I have replaced the #1 biggest stupid thing I have dealt with is the 20 (no exaggeration) different types of wallpaper put on the house in 1967 during the custom build. Out of the 20 only 3-4 types (2 specific rooms) had primer. Those two rooms ...


6

I would put a wood frame around/over it then cover the frame with a hardboard then decorate that. Many times that an internal framed wall has been removed to find things behind.


5

It is often faster and cheaper (particularly if you are paying for labor, so faster is cheaper, but merely saving your own time is good, too) to either cover the wallpapered wall with thin sheetrock, or bash out the wallpapered wall, do anything a sensible person would do with the wall open, and place new sheetrock. This seems like a drastic, nuclear ...


5

You should not do this. Foam insulation (EPS, XPS, etc.) needs to be covered with drywall in order to protect it (extend the amount of time before it melts) from fire. Otherwise you are risk of being exposed to toxic fumes and melting foam should you ever have a fire. Imagine molten foam dripping from your ceiling onto you - not a situation you want to find ...


5

tear it all down, replace with regular sheetrock / drwywall.


4

The previous owners of my house did this. Drywall compound will stick very well to wood paneling (please resist the urge to get "creative" with the texture...). Wallpaper, less so, and even if it sticks well, if the wallpaper ever started peeling off, it would take the top part of the wall with it. If you're going down this route, I would highly recommend ...


4

For posterity's sake, in the end after some testing we decided to go with approach #4 (the skim-coat). We did one layer of Zinsser Gardz sealer over everything, and then we used this skim-coating process, doing multiple coats of thinned-out lightweight joint compound applied with a roller and a rubber-edged 14" wide "Magic Trowel". That process gave us a ...


4

Definitely read up on the EPA 'renovation repair and painting' rule. Option #3, the 1/4" drywall, is likely to produce the best and cleanest results, at the cost of loss of room space and alteration in the look of all your trim. You'll have to extend all outlets also. Of course that sounds suspiciously like what happened last time. Eventually your room ...


4

A wallpaper steamer, a scorer, a stripping knife and A LOT of patience. I had to remove 3 layers of wallpaper in a flat I just got. This flat was built in the 19th century so no doubt the oldest layer was from the 60s at least. I tried everything, from various products to just ripping it off with a knife. In the end I bought myself a steamer and it turns ...


4

Oh boy!!! You definitely want to remove the wallpaper. Paint over wallpaper just doesn't work. You'll never know when it will just start to bubble up. I just removed all the wallpaper in my living room and used hot water in a spray bottle with some "DAWN" dishwater soap squirted into the bottle. Sprayed the walls, let it soak for 5-10 minutes and peeled it ...


3

Generally, yes - you can help protect the wallpaper with polyurethane. However, once the paper is on, it's not coming off without a complete overhaul (sand it all off and redo it), and you should be aware that paper tends to fade and yellow after a while. Also, if you use a brush to apply water based poly then you need to apply it kind of quickly and be (...


3

There are some types of spackle out there that claim they do not need primer over it, you may be safe with that, it is always recommended to primer under wall paper, it aids in the removal process later. If you have no paint on hand at all, get primer, if you have any latex paint around at all, that will suffice for a spot on the wall here and there.


3

Those "brown spots" are the inside of your drywall's surface paper. You're actually pulling off the surface of the drywall (which is the gray you see adjacent to the brown). It's not a total disaster, but normally you'd use a little moisture to dissolve the adhesive and gently scrape it off. Since you're going to paint, you'll need to do a few things for a ...


3

"they would tear any lose areas, spackle the torn areas , and spackle the seams". Sadly, this never works. The fact that there are loose areas means that more can appear at any time. The painters should have done whatever was necessary to remove the wallpaper. Instead, they compounded the problem. The easiest solution and probably the least expensive would ...


3

I suspect from the way you worded the text of your question... Two months ago I hired painters to paint my home interior and to paint over the wallpaper. ... that it was partly your decision to do the paint over to avoid the cost of removing the existing wall paper. It has been my experience that painting over wall coverings like this is always a risky ...


3

I had a similar issue and though it sounds like a lot of work and hard for a diy'er to do ( *I found a lot of sites that simply said call in a professional. ) However, for me that just wasn't an option due to finances. I too am told by many that I am too much of a perfectionist agree. I will say it has both advantages and disadvantages. Give yourself ...


2

In reality the brownish inner layer of drywall paper is very absorbent of water and also comes off in chunks if you try to sand, so never sand or apply water based material over it. If you sand you will still have similar problem of fluffy brown paper to deal with and it will be deeper than surrounding areas. If you apply joint compound, as some have ...


2

Fill a plant sprayer with hot water and dishwashing detergent and spray the wallpaper several times and let is soak for 30 minutes. Once the mixture has been incorporated well use a filling knife to remove the wall paper. Repeat this process for wall paper pieces that stubbornly stick to the wall several times in order to remove it. Note: this solution ...


2

Rent wall-paper steamers to remove the wall paper. Unfortunately, the latex paint will make it harder. You need to find a way to allow the steam to penetrate the latex. Use a scraper to scrape the paint, but not through the paper, so you don't damage the underlying wall surface. I've used rasps, cheese graters, etc. Just be careful you don't damage the walls ...


2

Yes, you can paint plasterboard directly - it's usually just paper on the outside. (Moisture resisting plasterboard tends to have a foil on on side though, which probably won't take paint well). What paint you use will depend what finish (or colours) you want, but you're unlikely to have problems using either emulsion or undercoat and gloss (or matt or ...


2

What can I do? You could get a sample tested for lead. For example there is a 3M product called LeadCheck. From what I've read: in the UK, lead-based paint was mostly used on woodwork. The relevant Wikipedia article suggests this. lead chromate was not used on walls after the early 1970s.


2

I have successfully done this with rental units. I may have gone overboard but this is what I did. Skimmed the grooves with DuraBond, scuffed the panels with a polesander while feathering the edges of the joint compound. Applied a coat of primer on the panels and joint compound. Read the directions for the wallpaper paste and if they recommend the use of "...


2

Likely non leachable so not much to worry about. Vacuum with hepa filter . Half madk while doing so . Dispose of in regular garbage . If it doesn't get runny when wet its non leachable and the risk factor is minimal as long as you use a hepa filter on vacuum and p100 filtets on your mask


2

There are many approaches. One of the least labor-intensive (but folks who have not gone down the route of removing wallpaper, etc. almost never believe it) is to apply a new layer of drywall (thinnest you can source) over the walls & ceiling you don't like the paper/texture on. That spares you from hours of steaming wall paper and fighting with the ...


2

I have experienced the trials of removing painted wallpaper. It is an absolute pain. The general principal of wallpaper removal is to get the paste wet. As use can imagine paint makes a very good water repellant. There is a handy tool (wallpaper tiger) that perforates the paper allowing the liquid to soften the paste. But it is still a pain. I mention all ...


2

I ran into the same question (and the same wallpaper!) when I started working on my 1929 Craftsman. Others have touched on many good points but I'll share things I ran into. First, the easiest way I found to remove the wallpaper... Cover the whole room with tarps and wear old clothes, it's going to be messy, wet, and sticky. Get one of the palm type paper ...


2

This is done with a special roller and common plaster/mud. It's just sort of hackle-dackle spackled on there, really amazingly cheap. The purpose is to roughen the surface to conceal lack of parallelness in the ceiling panels, drywall taping lines, hole patches, and other surface defects.


2

I would use the "fake stained glass" window products that are commonly available if doing anything to this. "Privacy film", etc... You clean the glass and they are applied with a mist of water and a squeegee to remove bubbles. They stay put (I've had them in a bathroom for several years on windows, as better than having curtains/blinds) ...


2

10 mm "truss" + 13 mm plasterboard (taking the high end) = 23 mm 23 mm x 2 (both sides) = 46 mm 10000 mm wide corridor - 46 mm = 964 mm Your estimate of 950mm of remaining space seems reasonable. Other than checking your math, I'm not sure what else we can tell you or what your real question is.


2

putting them up without these is impossible because all random dust is visible This is false. A wall can be made very nearly perfectly smooth and all but the tiniest of foreign materials can be removed. It is all about the preparation. Wallpaper has been a standard wallcovering for many years and not all jobs have "acne". Often, the person paying ...


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