Hot answers tagged

34

I've done it two ways. Take a coat hanger and bend a 1" 90 degree at the end of a straightened out hanger. Insert the bent edge down into the seem and twist the hanger so the 1" piece turns under the paver you want to pull up. work it back and forth with a screwdriver in the opposite edge while pulling the paver up. My other trick was to drill a ...


23

Using a crowbar or screwdriver etc. lift the pavers to the left of the sunken ones first. Lift the ones numbered 1 and 2 in the image: Then you should have enough room to dig out the sunken ones.


19

I've recently seen a video but can't find the link. Consider a Flexible Joint Knife, or the equivalent in a fairly wide spatula. Get a pair of them, to enable uniform lifting. Slice from each edge of the spatula about one-third of the way inward, about an inch or two from the bottom. Bend those cut tabs in the same direction. As you force the tool into the ...


14

Try using a pressure washer and a wet/dry vac to erode the sand and debris in the gap between the pavers. That'll hopefully get you to a place where at least the paver block can wobble freely, which will ease lifting it up. For lifting.. if you're lucky, and/or have a sufficiently large vacuum, the paver might be lifted by vacuum alone. A ring of clay or ...


13

Just to add to the various hints, and complete the picture of available techniques, professionals who do this a lot would use a vacuum slab lifter, something like this: Source: Express Tools However your surface area may be too small for this, but even smaller attachments are made for bespoke situations. A bit much of a purchase for a one-off, but worthy of ...


8

Yes, it is used in construction somewhat commonly. There are a couple of different situations where I have personally be involved with its use: Soil stabilization for large fills - In areas where the ground is soft and heavy construction equipment needs to move (e.g. access roads) it can be placed in layers and filled with soil to help distribute the weight ...


7

The Scout Pioneering website contains information on how to build several bridges. I am guessing that most of these are more complicated than what you had in mind, so if you want something simpler, you can attempt flat span bridge using 2x12's for a span between 14 and 18 feet. On the latter page the author goes on to say that "[i]f you are thinking of ...


6

What works for me is using two pruning saws. Place one in the gap on each side of the paver, then twist each one so the teeth grab the paver. Then lift. Easy.


4

This sounds like an issue from a physical damage standpoint While the NM cable only needs to be protected by guard strips if it's within 6' of a scuttle hole in your case, as per NEC 320.23(A) (referred to by NEC 334.23): (A) Cables Run Across the Top of Floor Joists. Where run across the top of floor joists, or within 2.1 m (7 ft) of the floor or ...


4

There was an episode of This Old House where they used it to make a patch of grass that could be driven over. They filled the holes with soil, and then put sod over the top. I'm not sure if this is the same product, but it looks very similar to what they used on the show. According to the website of one of the manufacturers, it can support up to 65 tonnes ...


3

Like you I recently bought a house on a septic system that also had some storm water drainage issues, so I'm answering not as an expert, but as someone with recently-acquired insight. How seriously to take the initial inspection.. First, since your initial inspection was performed by a different company than the one handling your yearly pumping, and since ...


3

I haven't used it & only saw it here or there, but a whopping 1-minute of familiarization showed it has some pretty awesome claims. However, it would seem to be mostly for water management. If you need that then yeah go for it & I don't see why you wouldn't be able to plow snow off of it. But, the problem I see is if you envision keeping the grid ...


2

Leveling, drainage, and protection of the flagstone, especially in freezing climates. Basically, in heavy soils, water can pool up under the flagstones and produce frost heaves, which will allow the flagstones to break much more easily. The sand and gravel produces an even base that supports the whole stone, and keeps it from cracking.


2

You don't need to go deeper than what you need for your design. Remove any substantial exposed roots on the starting surface (say pencil diameter or larger), mainly to level it and prevent voids if they eventually rot away. Landscape fabric can't hurt, but I'm not sure how much difference it will make. It's generally a good idea to start with a ...


2

Scrape as much of that dried glue off as you can, then use thinset mortar applied with a 1/2" notched trowel.


2

I would urge second opinions. The company which pumped and inspected recommended changing quite a few things, including my concrete tank. It turned out that after breaking the tank and pulling it out, it had not failed. There was allot of "creep" in the job, and if I had to do it again, I would more closely control the process. In my case I took soil ...


2

How about using some white glue (or other water-soluable) glue to attach a bolt/handle to the face of the paver? Once the repair is done, leave a soaking-wet rag on the glue overnight and wipe it off. If that doesn’t work, maybe some construction adhesive that can be dissolved with mineral spirits or ground off?


2

Easiest way to protect them is to fasten a board to the floor/joists on either side. I would paint the boards a contrasting colour so they are highly visible. Slightly harder, but probably even safer would be to split 1.5" waste pipe in half lay it over the pipe, and secure it with pipe hanger tape (metal pipe with a hole per inch)on either side.


2

That's built as solid as my parents' driveway. As a walkway, I'd say it's solid and probably ready for use now, but curing it for the additional 4 days could make it more durable and less likely to chip and spall later. A friend's neighbor poured a 3" thick dog run, then let his dog on it the next day. He later poured an additional 3" slab of the same ...


2

In this video Mike Haduck shows how he fixes pavers in his area (IIUC, he's been a stone mason for many years) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ioJsUnUDvok Basically he uses two screw drivers to get the first paver out, he gets it gradually from one side, then the other and so on and so forth until it's out. The rest of them should be easy. IIUC, pavers are ...


2

If you have even a single spare paver (as I do) then drilling in and using an appropriate plug can allow you to attach a screw eye and lift one straight out. After that the others should be fairly easy. When you've filled the void, replace the paver with the spare (perhaps using the one with the eye for a test fit) Even without a spare, you may be able to ...


1

Yes, but you'll need to absolutely remove any wax, and have favorable weather. Then you paint the concrete, and add traction grit to it. This is sort of like sand, but designed to work with the paint. If it wasn't outdoors, I would say the perfect paint was 2-part epoxy garage floor paint. However it is outdoors, and UV light from the paint would ...


1

That's a tricky one. Wax? It's supposed to be sealed but not with wax. If you can't identify exactly what it's composition is you'll have to resort to trial and error. Test removal methods in small inconspicuous areas. It may be extremely hard to remove the finish in winter. I would start with gentle solvents and progress up to etchants (acid that will ...


1

Technically I don't believe these violate the codes as they are written but they do seem to in spirit. If any of these are bothering you, it is up to you to make them safer. Add runways or shields to protect them or case them with split pipes - anything to get them out of harms way and keep you from tangling with them. The codes are meant to provide ...


1

The purpose of protecting the surface from drying out is to prevent plastic shrinkage cracks and is generally only an issue during the start of the curing process. Plastic shrinkage cracks occur if water evoraporates to quickly from the concrete, and the easiest solution is to cover the concrete with plastic. Adding water usually isn't necessary if you fix ...


1

Maybe try TERMITES at each end of the wood/root? And pre-poke a long hole right next to the root under the sidewalk, so they have a better chance of getting in there. Dump the TERMITES at each end and cover with a towel to keep them in the dark, and hope some live in that hole for a while and eat the wood/root. Maybe worth a shot since not hard to do.


1

Saturating wood with saltpeter produces an oxidizer, allowing it to burn while buried. In ancient days gone by you would drill a hole in the stump, fill it with saltpeter from the corner drug store, then light it after a couple days. The stump and roots would all burn. In these more enlightened times you're probably violating some civil ordinance by doing it....


1

If the pavers were installed properly--and it looks like they were--the edge banding should be staked into the ground much deeper than 6". So, structurally, I think there is nothing to worry about. Now, aesthetically, it does seem a little wonky. But we can't see the larger picture here. That said, if you are worried about a bit of erosion over time, I'd ...


1

My experience with the fabric is that it deteriorates over time and you get weeds through the fabric liner. Your first year maybe two will be fine. I had done this with a rock scape in a contained wall area , for my scenario remove and replace rocks and fabric (same job over again). Press in paving gravel (like you are going to make a parking lot) and then ...


1

Typically the layers are 2 or more inches of gravel for drainage, and 1" or more of sand for easy leveling of the pavers. I have seen it done with and without landscape fabric. I prefer it for weed prevention. There may or may not be a debate where the fabric goes. I have seen more often placed on top of the bare dirt that has been scraped of all vegetation. ...


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