10

You can probably get away with a weather proof box on top of the siding, but here's the full procedure to make it look nice. Vinyl siding can be pulled off and later reattached. To remove it, you need a siding removal tool that has a flat blade with a small hook on the end. You shove it up the gap between two pieces of siding and then pull to separate them. ...


8

Yes. What he was talking about was the "water-resistive barrier." (WRB) This is typically Tyvek housewrap (a kind of vapor-permeable plastic) or grade D building paper (tar-soaked paper). All wood-framed buildings need one of these, or else any water that penetrates the siding can contact the sheathing, and will quickly rot it out and infiltrate inside. All ...


7

The vinyl-siding manufacturers make special attachments for mounting receptacle boxes, with trim rings to seal against the siding. The attachments are the same or similar to what is used for railings and faucets: For small fixtures, it is also possible to just cut a hole for it in the regular siding (and presumably seal with silicone), as shown in the ...


5

The actual code requirements depend on your municipality/authority having jurisdiction (AHJ). Also, keep in mind the requirements in lots of places were different several years ago. Some places vinyl siding did not require a wrb below it. However, the current best practices are that you generally need a vapour barrier, air barrier, insulation, weather ...


4

Pine will work fine if prep on the wood is done correctly. Prime all ends, the back, the front and two coats of paint on front and ends. This is usually good for 10 plus years. Pine siding has been around on homes and barns in my northeast area of the US for well over 100 years. Some homes over 100 years old have the original wood barn siding as well as ...


4

Pine is a poor choose for siding in the northeast, and it is far more expensive than spec grade vinyl siding. Even though pine is used often for trim, when it is used to side an entire building expect the following problems. Wider boards, 1/2 X 6 and larger have a habit of checking and cupping when exposed to prolonged heat and moisture. Exterior pine needs ...


4

Pine has been the traditional siding in the Northeastern US for several hundred years (along with cedar shingles). Painting is the standard protection. While numerous products are lower maintenance, if you have the skill (not too much required) and time to keep it up (a good bit required), it should be fine.


4

Cutting the vinyl siding is easy. A hole saw, tin snips, etc, will slice right through it. When we cut with a circular saw, we often install the blade backwards to minimize ripping and tearing of the vinyl. That said, the hole is the least of your effort. You need to be sure the weather stripping and siding itself is properly done to keep the siding water ...


4

Arlington Fittings makes an electrical box and or special adapter for siding. While the box picture makes the mounting self evident, here's a specification sheet and here's an installation video. I think to purchase you would have to get through an electrical wholesaler. Usually we are supposed to give you a good description of how to use the suggested ...


4

They sell outdoor boxes that you could use Which you could add different waterproof covers to I would add silicon or some other sealant to the back of the box when you mount it. These can be secured right to the sheeting behind the siding.


4

You need vapour barrier (the plastic you put up before drywall) and air barrier. To count as an air barrier you stop air flow by using sheathing tape on: OSB joints and edges Vapour Barrier (this is most common) Tyvek Housewrap seams (becoming more common) Some people think that you only need a vapour barrier or that the vapour barrier is also an air ...


4

Agreed with the research you found. Most vinyl siding, if installed correctly, will not require caulk at the sides of the windows and doors. Often there is actually a separate vinyl piece installed first at the side of the window that the ends of the siding tuck into. You are supposed to leave a gap at the end of the siding pieces to permit expansion and ...


4

You obviously have to coat the bottom face of each lap. How you do that is at your discretion, but full-size rollers don't make it easy. You'd need a big, sloppy paint load to get good coverage, and this leads to dripping and splatter. I've traditionally used a brush for the undersides. Do that first, then roll over the brush marks on the vertical face. ...


3

I would drill a slightly larger hole and run the wire thru pvc conduit. It will protect the wire from accidental damage from a weedwacker, lawnmower etc. I think look cleaner and more professional.


3

The way you suggested will be fine. On the exterior, make sure to leave a drip loop in the wire in order to prevent water from running down the cable. Drill the hole high enough so that standing water next to the foundation won't leak into the hole. (source: chicagopropertyinspection.com)


3

It's mostly aesthetics, so opinions may vary. I don't what your budget is, but I see many ways it could be improved: The white siding part could be changed to match the beige siding to the right, or if the foundation allows it, replace the white siding with the same brick as the rest. The white door could be painted (or changed altogether) to match the ...


3

Some corners like yours are actually two parts--an inner part that's nailed to the wall framing, and a snap-on cover. You can actually see the inner component in your photo at the top. This arrangement allows for various styles to be used. Generally the inherent tension and friction of the two components prevents slipping like you've seen. With a wooden ...


3

Vinyl siding (along with steel) is fastened to your walls with nails that aren't fully set. This allows lateral movement when the siding expands and contracts due to temperature change. Ideally, the nails are set just snug enough to eliminate in-out movement, which is probably what you're hearing. If they were left out too far, some movement can occur. In ...


3

Chances are good that there was still enough airflow happening with the vented soffit panel in place. I'd try it out with the new fan and see how well it works before cutting the soffit up. Since the vinyl soffit was applied directly over the plywood soffit, you could install J-channel around the vent and cut the soffit to fit. You could also replace the ...


3

Open window of your room. Remove screen. Lean out (carefully) and screw eyebolt to bottom of window frame. Something like this. Bottom of window frame because A: easier and B: chime will not hit window in strong wind. Attach chime to eyebolt with carabiner, or chain, or something else appropriate for a site exposed to weather. If the chime annoys you ...


3

Another option is to use a plant hanger Fasten it to the side frame of your window. This puts the chime far enough from the wall it doesn't hit the house, but is close enough to the window to be very hearable. In passing: Chime sounds vary hugely on placement. We have a large stainless steel one that was on the patio. It took a fairly strong wind for ...


2

Rustoleum sells a mold/mildew-proof paint called Perma-White. They also sell a fungicide (Tiabendazole) additive called ADD-2 you can mix into your preferred paint. Either of those should at least help some.


2

I would recommend reading up on vinyl siding. It's really not as maintenance free as its manufacturers claim - it fades and becomes brittle. And unlike wood it can't really be repaired. Not to mention it looks pretty ugly and fake. Also if your house has any architectural details, then they would probably be covered up by the vinyl installation, ...


2

Create a scrap of the existing siding from somewhere where it won't be noticed by cutting a full length section from it. (And then buy a new piece to replace it.) Cut out the damaged section and replace it with the "scrap" from above. There are step-by-step instructions here and a video (skip to 0:01:00 to miss the clothing advertisement) showing the ...


2

Paint weathering tests show southern pine to be the poorest wood for holding paint. That is, using the same paint (various paints were used in different tests), the paint failed on pine first. Paints lasted longest on cedar and redwood. It was a significant difference, I don't remember exactly but roughly paint would fail on pine in 3 years and last over 10 ...


2

The hole saw will do the job. You don't need a perfectly clean cut here because your vent cover will hide the hole. But - ideally - drill your pilot hole from inside, then drill thru from the outside with the hole saw.


2

When I get paint on something like clothing I use nail polish remover. It takes time to soften the paint and remove it, but it doesn't harm the fabric.


2

Honestly, I'd use nothing. The problem is if you ever remove the screw, then the hole needs to be filled. Mount the bracket high-up, tucked under a lap, so you don't buckle the siding while installing it. Check both ends of the siding for play first. Affixed in the middle with room on both sides, it should be fine. Use screws with a fully threaded shank; you'...


2

Vinyl siding DOES NOT keep water on its front side. NO caulk or installation manner will modify the fact that water gets behind vinyl siding at many seams. This is especially true above every window and door. Inside corners can also intake a lot of water given correct wind. Vinyl siding is not now, and never was, a means of keeping water away from a home. ...


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