11

There are two main reasons: When you install planks there is a requirement that the ends of the plank must be within a certain distance of ends of other planks on adjacent rows. This means you probably cannot make your rows match perfectly even if the planking comes in a variety of sizes. So you will have some cut-off waste and for most planking, ...


9

The concern is probably that adhesives won't bond to treated plywood, or maybe that color will leach out and stain the new flooring. You're right that you're seeing paint overspray on your subfloor. It looks like standard raw BC plywood. Single-family residential subfloors are rarely treated, in my experience. This may not be true in some high population ...


7

Vinyl flooring will fail in short order if laid over something soft like carpet or carpet padding. It's not designed to flex and stretch as it will under foot traffic and furniture, and more concentrated point loads will simply tear it. It'll also wrinkle as it moves and stretches, creating trip hazards. It must be laid, even temporarily, on a hard surface.


6

That looks like good old plywood decking. No obvious treatment there.


4

You cannot avoid a divot when pulling nails out of concrete small divots I use epoxy filler larger or a large number I use a self leveling compound or hydraulic cement. Vinyl flooring will show divots so they need to be filled.


2

You're right, not the best way to do this. The vinyl will shrink a bit when cut if not glued down so don't try to cut it to fit. I'd keep at least an inch so you can trim to fit as you already know how hard it is to trim it accurately. Using the carpet as a template won't work either because carpet edges are never cut to fit exactly. Their edges are stuffed ...


2

I'm not a flooring expert, so take this with a grain of salt... So long as you're willing to accept the fact that you're using a product designed for indoor use in an outdoor application and that means: it's likely to fail earlier than you'd like it's likely to fail in less time than is claimed on the tin that any guarantee on the flooring probably won't be ...


2

Most modern vinyl flooring locks together securely, and since you're putting down shoe I'd have no concerns--if the plank can't lift it can't come loose. I recently did my laundry room and had this same issue for part of a wall. It's not always possible to plan away such scenarios. My flooring has no problems. Don't do anything hacky like larger moldings. ...


2

Luan plywood tends to have a ton of resin and other chemicals in it (due mostly to the species of wood used). This can leach out and stain tile grout or vinyl flooring (or cause adhesive issues due to salts, etc.). It's a very soft plywood, so it may not have enough rigidity to support the floor and prevent dents. It tends to have voids in the interior ...


2

Professional flooring installers would flood from the high point to the low point with self level. They typically charge per bag and I've seen this kind of job cost 15k when done for more than one level of a house. You can do as you suggest a hybrid approach. Installers won't typically go that route because it is a lot more labor and requires a lot more ...


2

I think it would totally impossible to get good results using that method. LVT is pretty flexible. I've remodeled a rental house and personally (not a contractor) installed LVT. It turned out pretty good, but I did need a leveling compound for part of the floor. Our church also replaced a bunch of carpet in the hallways with LVT and the installer missed a ...


2

That's the usual approach. Almost no one puts down double-thick subfloor in residential applications (for cost and handling reasons), and both layers need to be fastened to joists. Only thin underlayment can be fastened just to the subfloor. I'm not sure what your question about tile means. Subfloor can and should be fastened to joists regardless. You can ...


1

Yes, you can vinyl plank straight over tile. I did it for a bathroom and it turned out great. As far as leveling, unless we're talking something massive, I'd just buy a decent waterproof padding. It should cover most of the imperfections. This assumes the floor itself is level. If it's not, you'll need to add some floor leveler first. To finish the room, I ...


1

The imperfections will be felt through the vinyl flooring if you do nothing. Option 1: You should remove any tiles whose edges are not flush; hammer them, chisel them, whatever. Next you should pour self-leveling cement and sweep it into all of the grooves. Now you can install the vinyl. Option 2: Remove all of the tile until you get to the flat sub-floor ...


1

A not-entirely satisfactory "fix" I've used: Use a very sharp nail-set or strong awl to punch the nails well below the surface, being careful not to further damage the surface itself. Fill the divot and cracks with a cement such as epoxy, removing loose pieces or those that cannot be pushed in. Leave the patch slightly proud (above) the surface. ...


1

Another option: Self levelling low-spots only, and optionally adding plywood to smoothen the rest. "self levelling" cement is not liquid as you think and you can apply it in patches without worrying that it will run like water. You have some troweling time to work low areas as large as say 5x5 ft.


1

NO! No you should not attach them to the joist and no you should not have them match the pattern of the initial subfloor. Disclaimer: I take subfloors way more serious than the average human or contractor. I will answer this question but must confess my deep distain for OSB - unless the house will be carpeted. However I am OK (not happy) with OSB in ...


1

A: Lab test is the only way. B: In most parts of the civilized world, 1987 is VERY late for still having asbestos in any building product. C: You already removed it, which means you already handled it and made whatever dust there was to be made. Can't put that genie back in the bottle. However, See item B, as well as know that chronic exposure is much more ...


1

Use a circular saw with a wood cutting blade set to the depth of the vinyl floor thickness. Osc tools are invaluable for small jobs but they are slow and you'll burn through a lot of blades to cut something that size out. I'd use some quick support rods that push down on 2x4s around the area where you are cutting to prevent any of the boards from moving ...


1

particle boards don’t tolerate well humidity so remove them if your place can get humid. They will fail and whatever you put of top of them won’t be properly supported. For subfloor, both plywood and OSB will work fine. Many use OSB because it is much cheaper and the appearance is not a factor. If you plan on stacking boards, always overlap the seams for ...


1

As per a couple of suggestions, I did contact the manufacturer and got a prompt reply indicating that it would not be covered by warranty if installed that way. Thanks for the suggestion.


1

Newel posts aren't usually undercut. I would fit your flooring around it and install base shoe, mitered at the corners.


1

You can add an underlayment with vapour barrier, or just 6mil plastic vapour barrier underneath. Will protect the subfloor (wood) but not the vinyl seems. For occasional "accidents" this could work, and protect the subfloor from long term soaking.


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