15

Software would be nice, but setting up your room diagram is probably more work than just trying your layout in reality. Plus, there's no substitute for actually seeing it in place. I usually do this: Lay a row of tiles down the center of the long axis of the room. Don't forget to space them as you intend to do with the final floor. At key locations, run ...


4

It's a pain in the neck but you need to remove and dispose of the carpet. Anything you put on top of it will only cover a nasty mess that will get worse over time. Once the carpet is removed you will need to clean the cement of carpet glue. There are many videos and guides for how to remove carpet glue. Once the cement is prepped you have options. The ...


3

Unless installing a rigid material such as new plywood, luan, cement board, etc - you generally do not nail it down. When you do, ring shank is the right type of nail. But it has to be a decent quality nail vs. the cheapest bidder, also, the condition of the flooring it is being nailed into is quite important. Just nailing into plywood isn't going to cut it ...


3

I agree completely with isherwood, especially on a smaller job like a bathroom, but I wanted to add my recent experience with my recent, fairly complicated, tile layout. It required some pre-planning before we could even start to dry-fit the tiles. There were a few factors that caused the need to plan: A very large area with lots of transitions and corners (...


3

If you’re not installing cove base, I would definitely caulk the base to the sheet vinyl...or make sure you never allow teenage girls in your basement bathroom.


2

Floor transition trims (or strips) are usually glued. I would avoid an anchor, because in this case it's not really a transition (it's just vinyl on concrete, so it's less than 1mm) and the anchor head (no matter how flat) will not be flush; it'll look bad, and could lead to tripping. The thing is that the smallets trims expect some height difference. ...


2

This one is easy, if you perimeter bond the flooring ... When the sun shines in the room, the middle of the flooring will buckle up, enough a sliding chair might mar it or even create a tripping hazard :( Seriously the instructions should tell you why, not just give orders.


2

I believe the issue is that the center of the flooring material can expand and if the entire perimeter is bonded, the center will wave or wrinkle. When the entire floor is bonded, and expansion and contraction happens on a smaller scale. That said, I have never installed sheet vinyl and I don't know what the right solution is.


2

Mark the new plank with a depth line and measure the gap under the baseboard. Put masking tape on the plank so the line comes off after.


2

The problem is the small voids below the tiles, if it was flat this would not be a problem a roller will do the same as walking on it, possibly heating with a heat gun may help but it may damage them as they actually need to melt a bit to drop down , if you want a pro job with no noise or problems the tiles will need to be removed and a leveling compound ...


2

I would remove the transition strip and place the new flooring down and put the transition piece back on. If you glue something on top of the transition piece, it will be a trip hazard and will, in a short time, come loose.


1

I would remove the tile. Then put down the sub floor as you described (not sure about your choice of material) over the left hand section. If what you then have is fairly flat, cover the entire floor with 1/8" luan plywood (I think this is what they used in my laundry). The final covering was vinyl plank.


1

I don’t skimp often as some places have ended up without a stove and the buyer backed out until we finished the space on 1 flip and the next one we finished it after a renter damaged the stove, it can be done but after a couple of issues I totally finish dishwasher, stove and closet spaces , things my mentor said to skip but is 20$ worth the loss of a sale ...


1

This is actually done quite often, especially with gas appliances. People don't want to disconnect the gas lines to move their stoves. Many times the gas company will disconnect/reconnect for you. I have never floored around an appliance but I see it a lot. If you choose to do this, do yourself a favor and save a few lengths of the flooring in case you ...


1

I've dealt with something similar but in a laundry room and it was brick not tile. I did the floors and left that part alone and covered it with thin base cabinets to hold supplies.


1

I have peel and stick tile in several closets on particle board. But it sounds like you may have Oriented Strand Board (visible chips) which is not as smooth on the surface, and that might make a difference. Closets are low-traffic, which is why I was willing to use P&S at all, but it was a definite improvement from the nasty old carpet removed and the ...


1

To identify if moisture is wicking up from the ground tape a large square of plastic to the floor for 24 hours, when you peel the plastic up if the plastic is wet and or the floor it is coming from below. The only way I have had any luck drying out a wet slab is to wait till later in the summer and use a 2 part epoxy paint, I have had good results sealing ...


1

Use a traditional baseboard. If you're concerned about moisture, instead of wood/particle board, get PVC. There is plenty of nice stuff available like this one from Home Depot You should be able to find one with a just-wide-enough base. If not, use something simpler and add a matching 1/4-round. You can paint the baseboard the same color as your walls or a ...


1

You installed your floor properly as long as it is maintaining the minimum gap at the door, but you needed also make room for a transition strip which requires about an inch of room from the door. To include a transition strip I made my cut about 1 inch away from the surface where the transition strip was to go. Then the metal track that holds the ...


1

VERY simple fix for your issue that does not involve self leveler. Lift off the marble threshold, cut a piece of 1/2 inch plywood to place under the transition to fit. I would even cut a small 1/4 inch piece as well to place next to it to give more a smoother transition. Glue the plywood down with construction adhesive. This will also give you the ability to ...


1

I recently did some rip cuts on luxury vinyl plank and just used a table saw. A lot of people say to score and snap but every time I watch a how-to video, they will only score and snap the short way. I also don't trust my hands to create a good, straight line. This is just my opinion, but I think it's hard to score and snap 4 feet of any rigid material. So ...


1

I have found that serious application of a CARBIDE "paint scraper" will remove some truly miserable adhesive residue in a purely mechanical fashion. Don't even bother with the steel blade types, they proved useless. Typically have a narrow tungsten carbide blade that is clamped, and has two sides so you can flip it once for a fresh edge before replacing or ...


1

I had this problem: I just pulled up some flooring, ripped a new short piece for the corner and put the original piece back. If you glued, that wont work unless you are willing to scrape it out. Good luck. Not easy


1

A little late to this thread, but I could help but wonder... Is that rotting plywood you speak of due to moisture from your washing machine or other top-down sources, or is it likely due to the moisture seeping up from your concrete subfloor? If the moisture is coming up from the concrete, you've got bigger issues on your hands. The moisture will continue ...


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