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There are two main reasons: When you install planks there is a requirement that the ends of the plank must be within a certain distance of ends of other planks on adjacent rows. This means you probably cannot make your rows match perfectly even if the planking comes in a variety of sizes. So you will have some cut-off waste and for most planking, ...


2

I think it would totally impossible to get good results using that method. LVT is pretty flexible. I've remodeled a rental house and personally (not a contractor) installed LVT. It turned out pretty good, but I did need a leveling compound for part of the floor. Our church also replaced a bunch of carpet in the hallways with LVT and the installer missed a ...


1

Yes, you can vinyl plank straight over tile. I did it for a bathroom and it turned out great. As far as leveling, unless we're talking something massive, I'd just buy a decent waterproof padding. It should cover most of the imperfections. This assumes the floor itself is level. If it's not, you'll need to add some floor leveler first. To finish the room, I ...


1

The imperfections will be felt through the vinyl flooring if you do nothing. Option 1: You should remove any tiles whose edges are not flush; hammer them, chisel them, whatever. Next you should pour self-leveling cement and sweep it into all of the grooves. Now you can install the vinyl. Option 2: Remove all of the tile until you get to the flat sub-floor ...


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