New answers tagged

0

My problem is with the intake pipe frosting over due to the high amount of moisture being blown out the exhaust pipe. I've tried separating the pipes more and directing the exhaust up and lowering the intake. I've been told that the moisture is coming from the gas itself, and the only way to cure it will be to move the intake pipe to the other side of the ...


2

Trouble is, the air is laden with moisture and will billow up around the outlet (whatever you use). This might cause staining, and even eventual rot. Some of the roof tile vents are very neat and small these days (making assumptions here re. your tile type!) and run the pipe up to that? Best long term option. Also, I'd try to run an insulated pipe (or ...


1

Thanks to everyone for the feedback. At the end we had the electrician rewire that section so we could add new studs on either side of the one that would had been cut. Took a couple hours and turned out to be a better and simpler solution.


1

Those are rivets and you normally have to drill or grind them out. You can probably get in there with a rotary tool like a Dremel with a grinding wheel on it. If not, get a hack saw and just cut the bracket on each side to remove the internal parts and leave the rivets there. Is there a particular reason you want to remove it?


0

The problem you have, is that two 2x4 turned on side (as you propose) will be exactly 4" thick - which is the thickness of the other 2x4 studs - which means there is no space for the wiring. Given that you only need to create room for a 6" exhaust, I think you can go for a much simpler approach: | | | * | | *** | | * | ...


1

The correct way is to frame the opening with a header, jack studs(aka trimmers) and king studs in the same manner that window and door openings are framed. See image below for reference. The header is typically made of two pieces of 2x lumber face nailed together, sometimes with a piece of 1/2” plywood between the two to make the depth of the header match ...


0

I have put 3 or 4" duct pipes through the insulation with plastic flapper check valves. When the fan is on it pushes the flapper open , when the fan is off the flapper closes and stops air exchange with outside. Probably also need one on the kitchen exhaust fan but I only have duct and no flapper valve there.


0

All my registers have a black foam strip around them, like the foam weather strips you can get at your home store. The strips are about 1" x 1/4" by perimeter of register.


Top 50 recent answers are included