We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

Hot answers tagged

6

Why do you need a duct? Most bathroom vanities, for example, are wide open from a slot in the floor to the louver on the kick panel. Just close off the compartment by any convenient means and call it a day. Staple some cardboard in if that works. And parts from a big box store should work just fine. A common 2x10 or whatever size duct could be laid right in ...


5

You can get duct that is rated for underground use. It's more expensive of course, usually stainless steel. Your MUCH bigger problem with this idea however is that you are introducing a place for ground water to enter your basement. There is no good way to seal something as large and flimsy as vent pipe penetrating a basement cinder block wall. This will ...


4

It does come off. You squeeze those wire clips together and the ends pop out of the slots they are in. Then you can take the entire cover off. After that there is usually just one screw holding the fan motor in place, take that out and unplug the fan so that you can remove it and clean it thoroughly with a vacuum cleaner.


4

No, you cannot just block those air vents. If you do you will cause condensation problems. You need to investigate some cavity insulation systems - which would be more effective with your money compared to the triple glazing - think about the area of the walls and the areas of the windows. Whatever system of insulation is used, there must be some ...


4

Regardless of if this was ever standard, it's a bad idea. I lived in a 60's built house and the dryer vented under the house from a hole in the floor. The lint and moisture issues there were pretty bad to say the least. The same issue is happening in your attic (crawlspace?). The moisture in the exhausted air can cause problems for sure. The air can ...


4

You could use the 10 x 14 and cut edge off that goes up against the wall and then drill two holes in each of the long edges of the register close to the wall. Use two plastic anchors and screws there and then one of the regular screws that came with the register on the far end. Stay cool man.


4

Yes, you have a rodent or bird nest in there. No, you shouldn't break anything. That vent flap is simply hanging on two little integral pins or arms. You can see them in the photo. You should be able to tilt the flap into alignment with the duct, then flex it to release the arm on one side. Do your cleaning and replace the flap. Now find out why your ...


3

It turned out to be that there was no wax seal on the toilet. I hired a plumber who noticed that the toilet was wobbly and believed that a bad seal was the problem. It’s been a few weeks since he installed a new seal and we have not noticed the sewer gas smell once, so I think that was it! There were other clues. The previous owner had caulked the hell out ...


3

I got a tip elsewhere about using JB Weld, as I had the same problem. Worked like a charm! I got the one made for wood. It was a putty stick. You knead it together then stuff it into the screw hole. It hardens in 1 hour and gives you a fresh surface to drill a new hole. Good luck!


3

That flue pipe looks like "Transite" pipe which was used on some gas only appliances before about 1960. When I got into the heating business in the late 1960's nobody was still using it. There were better alternatives. If it is transite, it probably contains asbestos. I don't know of any caps available for use on this product. You could take a standard 6" ...


3

The Code says it cannot be vented into the attic or crawl space. (See ICC M1507, 2017 edition.)


2

If this is a heating duct, place a piece of sheet metal on the other side of the drywall and use a self-drilling screw to reattach the cover. If this is just a cover over a ventilation hole to the next floor (somewhat common in older buildings), you can safely use a piece of wood instead.


2

I used insulated flex ducting like below for my bath vents. Try to keep it flat or sloping toward the outside to avoid condensation pockets. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Master-Flow-4-in-x-12-ft-Insulated-Flexible-Duct-R6-Silver-Jacket-F6IFD4X144/203420974 Edit 1: I'm not familiar with a code that requires rigid ducting for bathroom fans. (Mass local here) ...


2

You don't need nearly 4". You can basically take the width and height of the gap on three, or even four sides of the floor vent into consideration, depending on how much of the undershelf area is open to the room. The air that comes through the grate can distribute to the sides as well as the front, and eventually make its way out from under the shelf. Air ...


2

The squirrel cage fan relies on velocity, not pressure, to move air. A near elbow stops the momentum and reduces airflow rate. If you need 90 degrees close to the fan, put 2 90s together and swivel the joints to make it into 2 45s. Down the path a 90 elbow is fine. If the run is long or has many bends, use a double 45 or try to keep the path as straight as ...


2

When I replaced a closed box recirculating bath fan with a large exhaust fan, I let the local hardware store owner convince me it was adequate to vent the bath fan into the attic because (he said) “the ridge vent would adequately exhaust all the bathroom air.” BIGGEST MISTAKE WE EVER MADE. By the dry winter season our ceilings all separated from the tops of ...


2

Check out lutron SFSQ-LF-GR 120v 360w 1.5 amp 3 speed fan control light switch on 1 yoke this will fit in your existing space since that was your concern. I may have mis read your question, so here is a light dimmer with a separate on off switch for the fan, Lutein MA-L3S25-WH. Hope one of those works. Or a pir sensor and switch so the fan turns on when you ...


2

As a temporary fix, spread a layer of Henry Roof Patch around the area where the Pipe Flashing will go. Then press the boot down into the cold patch. Install a screw into each corner and attach the boot to the roof. Make sure the screws are long enough to go into the decking material. Spread some cold patch over the entire boot, especially the edges and at ...


2

I'm going to venture a guess here (at least until photos come). 2.5" isn't a pipe size so I'm going to go out on a limb and call it 3 inch that will be for your toilet. Regarding the bucket I'm going to guess that only a bottom half of the bucket is showing which means that there is a space in there to put a trap for a shower or tub. If the previous ...


2

You can do what you are suggesting. I like the bore through the stone better though. If you want your method I'd use a plastic pipe as a sleeve or a corrugated metal, parge/concrete around the sleeve, run your underground rated sheet metal through the sleeve, parge/caulk between the sleeve and your sheet metal (you might want a fire rated caulk), then ...


2

The vanes in a vent like that are usually just plastic with small pegs that project out from each of the top left and right corners. These pegs fit into holes in the vertical side rail of the vent frame so that the vanes can hinge out when there is positive air pressure coming out the pipe. They then swing back into the closed position under the force of ...


2

We’ve had several similar problems. We’ve solved them by 1) undercut the door, 2) through wall grille,3) through wall grille with sound baffles, You’re right, you can’t “push” more air into the room without providing an air relief. (It’s the old straw example...you can’t blow into it if you have your finger over the other end. ) 1) The simplest and ...


2

Additional options you might consider: 1) Installing a small louver in one or both doors. If that doesn't work for some reason, you only have to replace the door(s). 2) Cut a small register in the existing return duct, then run a new small duct in the return air cavity to the wall. Perhaps a 4x6 or 3x12. 3) If the air return cavity is roomy enough(?) Cut ...


1

Put up drywall first - it is easier to get it parallel to close walls since you could install drywall 1-2% off. If you are not attaching this to a run and it is an open return I would also suggest trying to get at least one side next to a stud. Often the support holes for these are close to the opening so even with a good anchor these get flimsy.


1

The short answer is no. B-vent cannot be cut. But there is hope. You don't have a joint in the straight run but you do have two 90s This shows a B-C adapter with a C vent 90 C vent isn't actually a thing, it's just what people called regular venting. Everything below the B-C adapter is fair game you could potentially remove the B vent 90s attach the B-C ...


1

Wow, landlords can really be dummies sometime. The simplest answer is that the turbine company paid an engineer to design/improve their turbine to be most effective relative to the cost of production. If stopping the blades were more effective then there would be no bearings for them to spin on and the turbines would cost less to build. The landlords idea ...


1

You can do this by mildly abusing a 3-wire fluorescent dimmer While incandescent lights are happy with only a dimmed-hot and a neutral, some lighting systems (such as fluorescents) are tougher to dim using standard two-wire dimming. As a result, dimmable fluorescent setups use different ballasts that accept multiple inputs: one switched-hot to provide ...


1

Short of replacing your window with a duct with several turns, lined with sound baffles, you aren't going to get quiet. Human ear is amazingly sensitive. 30 db is a very quiet country side. Flies buzzing, birds chirping. Office is about 70 db 40 db difference doesn't sound like much, but it's a log scale. That office is a thousand times noisier. 3 db ...


1

It looks to me, based on what you have posted, that you have a blocked, under sized or non-existent vent system. I have seen several times when DIY people cannot understand the purpose and function of the vents and think they are superfluous, so they don't replace them when re-doing the plumbing, or use too small of a vent pipe. The volume of water leaving a ...


1

Yes, this will cause a problem. You say, “with an opening in the side of this pipe...” If there isn’t a solid pipe (without openings) in your new exhaust pipe, it will partially vent kitchen air into your attic. (Good practice calls for the pipe joints to be lapped in the direction of the exhaust and sealed...no openings.) Having a “gravity” vent in your ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible