Hot answers tagged

22

Calculating Cubic Feet The first step in determining what size exhaust fan is needed, is to calculate the volume of the room. To do this, you'll simply multiply the length of the room times the width of the room time the height of the room. Length = 10 ft. Width = 8 ft. Height = 8 ft. 10 ft. * 8 ft. * 8 ft. = 640 ft.3 Calculate Equivalent Duct Length (EDL)...


22

First off, you misunderstand the intention of the extractor fan. It is not to remove hot air. It is to remove moisture from the air, and that's done to help protect against mold and mildew buildup. This is particularly important in bathrooms where the door is usually left shut. (It still helps with open door bathrooms too but in those cases the ...


20

Any electrical socket in a bathroom must have GFCI protection. You're damp, you touch something with a ground fault, feel a slight tickle and wake up wearing a halo and wings. Of all places to hack together power supplies, a bathroom is absolutely the worst place to do this. Mystical theories about the heater protecting the strip from dampness don't remove ...


20

Perhaps a leafblower (or two?) might clean it out a bit? Also maybe get advice on how to make the outside vent area fire resistant if the tube does catch fire.


19

TL;DR: It is explicitly not to code to exhaust into the attic or to use foil pipe It's a bad idea anyway because it puts smoke, grease and warm humid air into your attic which can cause mold growth 2015 International Residential Code, Chapter 15: M1501.1 Outdoor discharge. The air removed by every mechanical exhaust system shall be discharged to ...


16

I don't know your location, but in the USA, it is strictly forbidden to run any electrical wiring through heating vents or any air handling plenum. The reason for this is that you now have a combustible material in the plenum, that can spread a fire between rooms and into wall cavities. As previously mentioned, any AC electrical outlets in a bathroom MUST ...


15

Vented air from the dryer is full of moisture since it contains water from the clothing being dried. Do not vent it into your crawlspace or basement since you will definitely have moisture problems. After you vent it outside, run the dryer and put your hand over the vent and you will see what I mean.


12

You're mixing grease with lint, which is only going to make a mess and clog up in no time. You could also create a situation where dryer exhaust goes back into your house instead of outside, causing excessive humidity and a mold/mildew risk. The workaround for that would be to install dampers, but those would likely get jammed with the grease/lint ...


11

Add both a secondary lint trap and a dryer duct booster fan. Fantech and Tjernlund are a couple brands to help you start your search. Also, replacing any easily accessible flexible duct with rigid ducts can help prevent lint from building up. Finally, check that the exhaust louver/vent cap outside isn't filled with lint too. Sometimes contractors use ...


10

Dryer vent air is full of water vapor and dust. I wouldn't want to blow it into my house. I do not know how much heat (BTU's) a dryer outputs during a run but it seems like it would be a small amount, and of course most people don't run their dryer very often - maybe a handful of times a week.


10

That pipe looks like an air intake. All "direct vent" style appliances (high efficiency on-demand water heater, gas fireplace, etc.) have an isolated air intake and it is common to have it suck in air from outside the building so as not to force air infiltration through doors, windows, etc. Indeed, that is ugly. Our fireplace and tankless water heater ...


10

I don't know where you live, but something to consider is that you're dumping warm, moist air into a potentially cold zone. So some of that air can/will condense in there in winter. Since attics tend to be filled with untreated wood, that means you're creating all the necessary conditions for mold to grow. That can potentially negatively affect your home air ...


9

The biggest issue you have venting into the attic is warm, moist air being blown into a somewhat closed area (aside from the grease and particles you have a filter for). If the attic space you vent into is large, and has good ventilation this shouldn't be an issue. If you have to vent into a small portion of the attic and it looks like the moist air will ...


9

In my personal opinion, this type of duct is NEVER a good idea for a dryer vent. Lint sticks to the inside much more than smooth metal. It's virtually impossible to clean effectively, without damaging the duct. How long do you think it will last (contain the flames) when the lint inside catches fire? Solid, smooth metal is the only sensible choice. ...


8

No. It has to be rigid metal pipe in the wall. Plastic pipe is a fire hazard. Note that you cannot use screws to attach together metal pipe for dryer vents; lint can collect on it and become a fire hazard.


8

You can install a reducer, but you'll cut your flow volume by an equal proportion: 28.3in2 - 7.1in2 = 21.2in2 (an area reduction of 75% when going from 6" to 3" duct) This will negate a significant amount of your fan upgrade, will make it work harder, and may shorten the motor's life due to reduced cooling. You might ask yourself whether you really need ...


8

I've typically just seen that called metal strapping or steel strapping. Home depot sells a similar thing in their ventilation accessories section, and they call it 'perforated metal hanger straps': https://www.homedepot.com/p/Master-Flow-Perforated-Metal-Hanger-Straps-3-4HS/100396917 Most metal strapping I've seen has straight sides, instead of wavy ones ...


7

Yes, that's considered safe. The operating temperature of a dryer vent is not a problem for direct wood contact. Keep the vent clear and you'll have no fire. Ensure all joints are foil taped, so lint does not escape from the pipe. Should lint escape the pipe, it can build up in the wall. Use a "long sweep" elbow to make the vent easier to clean out. ...


7

Buy a 5" holesaw (and a drill sturdy enough to drive it). Cut a 5" hole in a big chunk of plywood. Screw/nail/clamp the plywood in the place where you want the hole. Drill away. If you're having a hard time with the drill binding and trying to twist your wrist off, run it in reverse. It's much slower, but you won't have the same problem. Couple more tips: ...


7

Sorry I don't have enough points to comment yet so have to put this reply in the answer. I had a vent coming out under the cabinets in the kitchen of my house for 20 years with NO PROBLEM (i.e. at the floor level where the kick-plate is). This wasn't even ductwork under the cabinet, but rather the vent exhausted into the frame under the cabinets, which ...


7

Nonsense... there's no way the output from the AC will damage a modern cabinet. The carcass of the cabinet is undoubtedly plywood or MDF which is plenty dimensionally stable. If you're still worried, add louvers and point the exhaust away from the cabinets, but I wouldn't give it a second thought.


7

Your duct experiment and past experience indicates that the existing venting is limiting the performance of the dryer. You can't vent into the garage (see below) and being in Florida I assume you are on a slab so there won't be some alternate route into a basement or crawl space. Your best solution may be a condensing (ductless) dryer. This snippet of ...


6

I would completely disagree with your builder. Since it is a new garage, I do see merit in the "build it in" approach. There are two important considerations: how many CFM do you need and what kind of noise level is tolerable? Are you using anything flammable? Water based paints should not be a problem but solvent based paints require special attention. ...


6

I doubt it. They might help in the spring when they are open, but definitely not in the fall/winter when they are closed. Vent it outside to avoid any issues.


6

Yes. I was building a new home in Baytown Texas (completed in 2006) and searched far and wide for thermostat controlled dampers - was told by many HVAC companies that "they" remove them weekly - this isn't true. I found one installer in Houston that would do the system the way I suggested - he listened and so did I. We compromised on 2 units with 3 ...


6

A capped opening in a sewer line is called a clean-out, usually they are a 4" long bend wye with a cap on one branch so you can pull the cover and run a snake down the whole length of the main sewer line. In this case, a 2" pipe would be a good size to run a snake down to clear any clogs downstream from the toilet. I'd guess that somebody didn't allow ...


6

If you have access to the attic; and presumably the top of the bathroom fan, you may be able to follow the duct. If you don't have access to the top side of the fan, you could remove the cover and take a peek inside. You should be able to get a glimpse of the outlet, which should allow you to determine if there's ducting attached. In my house, the bathroom ...


6

IRC - 2006 Requires bath fans only if no operable window. Bathroom ventilation can operate intermittently at a minimum of 50 cfm or continuously at a minimum of 20 cfm, the same as 62 Bath fans must meet the design airflow either through on airflow either through on site testing or using their certified rated flow at 0.25” water column. Bath fans must be ...


6

IMO, and IME, bathroom fans should always be vented outside. Bathrooms are one of the biggest (if not the biggest) producer or water vapor in your home. When water vapor is trapped is can cause things like mold, mildew, damage to furniture, added difficulty in conditioning the air, and many more. Just because a bathroom vent is not currently vented to the ...


6

We've got several things going on here: This is a ridge-mounted, Slant-Back Roof Vent -- it's used to ventilate Attic air to the outside. It should not be used for double-duty for a Bath Fan exhaust. Warm moist Bathroom air will condensate on its underside and can cause moisture damage & mold on the roof sheathing. As a Slant-Back Vent, the original ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible