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5

I would handle this as a tile countertop. Instead of small 4x4 tiles you will be working with the larger slate sheets. This means, 3/4 plywood down as a base. Cement board on top of that and then thin set to attach the tiles. You can then trim the outsides in whatever you want. It can be wood, tile or metal. You can also use the slate cut into smaller ...


4

Probably not a good idea. As you said, the stones are heavy. If you could guarantee a solid rest on the floor, maybe, but I'd simply cut out the drywall a few inches inside your stone area, replace it with 1/2" cementboard, and call it good. This would be simpler than the wire lath business. I'd float backing at the joint of the cementboard and drywall to ...


4

Assuming the purported professionals were actually insured, you find the local piano shop (if one currently in production, ideally the shop dealing in that brand) and inquire about having it fixed, on the movers (or the movers' insurance's) dime. If it needs to move to get fixed, use Piano Movers.


3

I'd install some wooden trim / decorative moulding and paint it to match nearby woodwork. Make the left vertical edge of the decorative-stone even by cutting where needed (e.g. middle row of upper photo). tack/glue appropriate sized stripwood behind front edge of moulding as shim. Attach the shimmed moulding using adhesive (as presumably used for the ...


2

The idea of pushing a brick veneer wall back onto its bearing surface is really not a good idea. Besides water will not push it off, something else did in my opinion, like wood that swelled up from the leak, but that will be minimal. I would still be more concerned about the water around the framing behind the brick. If the brick ain't fallen yet, it may not....


2

Yes, you must remove all the paint. All the weight of the mortar and stone will be depending not on the mortar bond to the substrate, but on the bond between the thin layer of paint and the substrate. That bond, which was designed to hold only the paint itself, is sure to fail in time. I have repaired two different situations like this: thin brick pavers ...


2

I guess the Water was previously redirected by the AC which was your sill. Therefore I would install a sill to redirect the water away from the house.


2

I prefer using Toggler toggle anchors. They can be adjusted up to over 3 inches for thick walls and are extremely strong. They are overkill for a magnetic knife bar but will work nicely. The issue you will likely have is the size of the head of the machine screws that come with it will be too big for the keyholes you have used on your knife holder. You ...


2

You probably need to drill a hole big enough so you can push through a typical wall anchor. Then buy longer bolts the same thread size to attach the holder if the screws that come with the anchors are not long enough.


2

For minor repairs I have used lacquer sticks with much success. There are videos of people who really know how to use the sticks to make repairs like you need. You could try it yourself with practice. The sticks are not a big investment. Paint could be used too, as in faux finish, but that is definitely an acquired touch.


1

I would use caution with whatever you do there is particle board behind that and if it swells up if it hasn’t already it may be tough to repair without a commercial steamer. I have used a damp towel and an iron to fix flood damage like this. The trick is to get the veneer damp and hot it becomes almost like pasta noodles I then use a wood glue and saturate ...


1

If it’s a floating mantle, I would recommend installing stone around the mantle. You can make a template the size of your mantle with scrap wood and install it onto the cement board. Then butt your stone right up to it. Once you’re done and the cement is completely dried, remove the template and install your mantle.


1

If you use actual cement board, actual mortar, and actual stone, it will hold together due to a chemical reaction that basically turns the stone, mortar, and rock into a single piece of rock. Just make sure NOT to use too much water in the mortar. It should be almost like playdough. The biggest mistake people make with mortar (and other cement) is making ...


1

I would go with a piece of square trim that would fit under. stain it to be the color of your floor or perhaps darker (or black). It would cover the board but it would have a finished look. I'd also try to make it thin enough so that it wouldn't stick out past the brick.


1

I'm surprised that you can't find 1/8" plywood (luan), but have you asked about Thermo-ply? It's a thick waxed cardboard, supposedly for sheathing (ha!) but suitable for your application. Ramboard (somewhat thick cardboard, sold on the roll) would be suitable if you used entire sheets (as opposed to strips). The factory edge on this is handy for straight ...


1

You could carefully drill a small hole from below, into the bubble. Then make a small slit in the bubble with a fresh razor. Get some five minute epoxy into the bubble via the slit, then use a vacuum to apply suction to the hole you drilled while gently pressing down on the bubble. Maybe have a putty knife handy for pressing and smoothing. With a little luck ...


1

Slate and shale are essentially the same thing, but slate is the "metamorphic" form, meaning it was shale, but changed into a DIFFERENT (more dense) form by eons of time and tons of pressure. So slate would not be fissile ("flaky") to the average expression of human force. That's shale, aka "flagstone". People use it for siding and walkways, but usually in ...


1

The stone guys installed the wire with was looks to be 1/2 staples over the tyvek. Then a scratch coat over that. Is that ok to do that? Yes that is the normal way to install the wire mesh. If your OSB is only 1/2" thick then a longer staple will not hold much better unless you hit a stud. If there enough staples then the brick is not going anywhere. ...


1

I agree that it sounds like crappy workmanship that came from your contractor. The best situation is to talk to the contractor and tell them that how unhappy you are with the crap quality. What the contractor should have done when drilling the holes for the drawer pulls was to clamp a piece of scrap wood to the inside face of the drawer front to prevent the ...


1

Wow, I don't know if I could figure out how to re-position the brick veneer back into place, but your question is about fastening them to the wood frame wall, once they are in place. So, I see two problems: 1) proper anchors, and 2) keeping the wall "sealed" after the anchors are installed. 1) Proper Anchor: Veneer brick is not stable without anchors ...


1

It is just black mortar. They sell mortar in many different colors along with powdered coloring you can add to make just about any color you want. Mortar is used between brick and block to seal the joint from the elements, and to lock the bricks together (among other things). In the picture above, it is not used to lock the bricks together or weatherproof ...


1

We just finished installing black slate chalk boards for counter tops. We used 3/4" plywood, then used construction adhesive. For edging we used 3/8" hickory to match the cupboards. When cutting be sure to tape the cut line and carefully support it so you avoid chipping the end of your cut.


1

For those who came here from web search, I've done this and I can share my experience. You install doors before. There will be gaps between firebox bricks and door frame - cover them with cement. Remember to raise doors high enough over existing opening to allow for the thickness of the new hearth stones (if you plan to put them) so that these little vents ...


1

I ended up hiring a professional repair person who works for Steinway to make the repair. He used a polyester filler. The results are very good but not perfect. I will post a picture soon.


1

The finish will be almost impossible to match entirely, but if the damage is just skin deep (like a horridly bad scratch) and didn't hurt the structure or internals, you could remove anything proud of the surface . Fill the gouge with filler then sand, prime and paint. It would look better from afar, but you'd still see it in person from a few feet away. ...


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