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1

Unless for some reason you don't like the natural color of your flooring I suggest just putting down a few coats of clear varnish. Clear varnish brings out the natural color of the wood, and in my experience this gives the best results. We had some flooring work done on a house we were selling and the contractor suggested staining the new flooring "to match"...


3

Consider your skill level / experience and expectations of how perfectionist you are. Stain will tend to bring out any imperfections in the sanding of the floor. When you sand it creates a pattern of scratches in the wood going in random directions. Each successive stage (grit) of sanding removes the previous marks until ultimately it is so smooth you can't ...


4

Wet the wood first - to bring up the irregular grain Sand (lightly) away any of that grain that might have been expanded from the wetting and now "sticking up" make it smooth tac clean the surface well Apply the STAIN - you can dilute if you desire a SHABBY light enhancement Wait a bit. Let the wood drink up that color! Often colors DARKEN as they DRY" ...


3

I like to stain first, even though I've only used "natural" color stain which doesn't really contain any stain, only oils. Aside from getting the look right before you start sealing it, what I really like is that the bare wood is already somewhat protected from dirt, scuff marks, etc. before you have a bunch of sticky varnish you're trying to put down. It ...


9

If you stain and then varnish, you can control each step on its own. You can get the stain looking nice and even on the floor, and then when the clear varnish goes on top, the color will not be affected no matter how many coats you need of varnish. If you use a varnish with color in it, you have to be very careful to evenly apply it on the floor. If there ...


16

Stain is just color. While it does provide some degree of sealing, whether you use it or not under varnish is entirely discretionary. The primary difference between the two options is that proper stain tends to penetrate the grain more, creating more contrast. Colored varnishes overlay a semi-opaque color that tends to mute grain contrast, leaving a more ...


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