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5

The sheen of the varnish needs to come off first. That can be done best in my opinion with sand paper, 175-grit would be good.


4

It means sapwood (lighter colored) is permitted in the grading of the board,so it's not guaranteed to be a full-face of "black" walnut (which is the most common walnut to run into that terminology for.) If the's been steamed, the color may not be all that noticeable, since that migrates color into the sapwood from the heartwood - for air dried there is a ...


4

That appears to be a subfloor (softwood, plain edges, face-nailed.) It's a good place to put a finish floor (hardwood, parquet, etc) and not a very good finish floor itself, no matter what you coat it with. Softwood finish-floors are not unheard of, but that isn't one, IMHO.


4

Varnish is usually a mixture of a drying oil, some resin such as pine tar, and a solvent such as turpentine. The drying oil most likely won't kill you. The most commonly used oil, linseed oil, is actually just non-food-grade flax oil by another name. The Greeks put pine tar in their wine, and it's a tasty treat. The solvent is a little more troublesome. ...


3

Before doing anything else, give part of the new board a swipe with paint thinner. Dampening it gives you an idea of what it will look like under a clear varnish, and paint thinner evaporates quickly enough that it doesn't tend to raise grain or otherwise interfere with the rest of the finishing process. That'll give you some idea of how much the color ...


3

Now you know why varnish is rarely used anymore. If it is pure varnish/shellac, then damage to the wood is likely. Before sanding and refinishing, the nuclear option is to try to rub it out with denatured alcohol. The alcohol will dissolve the varnish and redistribute or remove it. You can then touch up the varnish carefully. If it is lacquer, then use ...


3

I've used the steel wool + vinegar method before*. It's essentially a stain so really only affects the surface layer. It shouldn't have any meaningful affect on the strength of the piece of wood. Splitting and warping is related to moisture and drying so wouldn't really be affecting by weathering stain. After you weather it, note that most any additional ...


3

Razor scrapper would work best with a little mineral spirits.


3

I really doubt you can sand your floors. Some engineered floors can be but this is a very small percent. And this would be a diy because pros won't want to be responsible for the thin top layer sanding through. One of the things I have found with engineered hardwood is the clear coat varies drastically from different types. I have tested a lot and some ...


3

Test it first. You may be able to just stain the filler as is. If that does not work, dig out the existing filler with whatever tool works (putty knife, old drill bit, a thick nail) and replace it with something you can stain. Not sure if paint stripper works on filler, but it's work a short. If there's any other stains or treatments on the door though, ...


3

Yes (with some prep), however, you can try lightly sanding with 600 grit wet/dry sandpaper. Use it lightly wetted. Buff dry with a soft cloth. You may find this is matte enough.. DONE! If its too matte (flat) you are now prepped and ready to recoat with satin or matte.


3

As @bib says in his comment, the purpose of the finish is really dependent on what the wood is being used for. Most wood finishes will provided at least a little protection from drying and abrasion, but other than that it's really application specific. (By the way you use the word "varnish", which is a specific category of wood finishes, but there are many ...


3

Generally speaking, varnish makes the wood look pretty and shiny and protects it from water although the protection is not perfect. A much better explanation can be found in the book Understanding Wood Finishing by Bob Flexner. It has been through several editions so your local public library should have a copy. He debunks a lot of myths and is pretty ...


2

I would not let the bugs remain either, If it is cold outside where you are now as it is here in MD USA, the warm inside temps will make the bugs quite active again. I had that happen with a cherry burl I was turning, luckily I put it in a large clear plastic bag solely for the purpose of slowing moisture loss to reduce checking. After a few days I checked ...


2

It is very unusual for Urethane to Buckle or alligator skin when applied over urethane. The reason for this type of failure is usually a contaminate on the surface. Grease, oil, wax etc. Did you use the same type of urethane from the same lot? After sanding, did you clean the dust off with a cloth that may have had some contaminates on it? I always use a ...


2

No mineral spirits are not a good conditioner for wood. Solvents in general will dry wood out and break down any oils that are in the wood. This leads to decay of the wood. What are you conditioning it for? Do you plan to stain and seal it or are you simply trying to protect the wood?


2

most of the blue dyes in toilet cleaners are copper sulphate pentahydrate. flushing the stain with dilute muriatic acid should re-dissolve it. be gentle, wear gloves and a respirator, and keep the area small. flush with water and baking soda immediately after you notice the stain is gone to stop the reaction from progressing too far. seal afterwards with ...


2

By Googling for "chipboard sealant" I found a UK vendor of "work top edge sealer" that seems to be designed for that sort of job. Seals & Waterproofs Sawn Or Drilled Edges, Joints, Sink Cut Outs etc. Excellent sealing and waterproofing properties. Ideal for use on MDF, Chipboard, Timber etc. Prevents water ingress into sawn edges. Easy to ...


2

I've used common water-based polyurethane on particle board and fiberboard with no ill effects. If you allow it to dry in a timely manner, you'll see virtually no swelling. If you want to be extra cautious, use oil based polyurethane. It won't absorb into the particle board as much.


2

Compiling information from Ken, RedGrittyBrick, isherwood and my own experience to form proper answer: It's possible to varnish chipboard, but a suitable varnish must be used. Suitability will depend on how difficult it is for its components to be absorbed by the chipboard and cause swelling: oil-based would probably be safer than water-based. The safest ...


2

You are looking at the correct products but to get a high gloss several coats will be needed with a very light sanding or steel wool buff and clean in between coats. In high end finishes I put at least 5 coats and have used closer to 30 on show pieces. Light sanding between coats is important, don't over work or you will have bumps , put it on let dry buff ...


2

Not finishing wood is perfectly fine. It will be more prone to collecting dirt and stains than finished wood, but if you don't mind that, it's still fine. If your budget allows, you can also apply finish yourself, some of which are quite inexpensive and relatively easy. But you don't have to. If at some later point you feel that the dirt and stains ...


1

the gaps between boards are too big. It was not meant to be the finished floor. looks like pine, fir or something similar.


1

All varnishes set in two phases. First the solvent evaporates as it dries, then the as the resin molecules come into contact they cross link and cure. The only concerns with the actual curing time, which can be up to month, are that you follow the minimum time between coats on the label (generally about a day) and preferable wait the month before eating off ...


1

Urethane doesn't "cure". It dries as the solvent (which may or may not be water) evaporates. It isn't like masonry where time and moisture are critical. There's no problem applying urethane in the sun other than the challenges it poses to the actual application. Very quick dry times mean less time to get good coverage and work out runs. Never apply ...


1

You can paint over varnish, but you will need to thoroughly sand and degloss the existing finish first. I use medium grit sandpaper followed by fine, then wipe with solvent to remove all dust, dirt etc., then paint with high quality oil-based paint using the very best paint brush I can afford. Just finished some old varnished cabinets and they look great ...


1

A 4-inch wide razor scraper might remove much of the dried oil. Hold it lightly and at a small angle to the surface. But you will have to be careful to avoid letting a corner of the scraper dig into the wood.


1

I just crafted an outdoor booth for spray painting kitchen cabinet doors. I have a pop-up tent (that we already had) for the roof and structure. I have hung 8 cheap ($5 ea.) plastic shower curtain liners around the perimeter and a cheap plastic tarp for the floor. (upper gaps will be closed before spraying) The goal is to keep the smell and spray from my ...


1

Mario, I've been stripping paint off old doors, sanding, staining, and applying poly outside. It's more convenient in dealing with the mess and smells and more enjoyable than being cooped-up indoors all the time. However, be aware that applying poly outdoors is best done inside a screened-off enclosure as every insect or airborne speck of dust, dirt, or ...


1

You'll never get it to match. Even if you bought the exact same stain and exact same varnish, it still wouldn't match because the rest of the floor has aged. The only real solution to this is to refinish the entire floor by sanding it down and re-staining. While a lot of work, it is in the realm of do-it-yourselfers if you have the right tools and some ...


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