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2

The "twisted" or bent aspect is the pipe it's connected to, not the valve. If you are replacing with a new supply in a few months there's not a particularly strong incentive to replace it now, but it can be done. There are various approaches to "no valve upstream" - one of the more common ones these days is to freeze a short section of ...


1

Let me take this from the value proposition angle (I am assuming you own none of these) A scoring tube cutter is about $15. A simple metal file is $10 or less (or you can buy a de-burr/reamer tool for more than that). A Sharkbite 3/8" ball valve itself (just shove it on) is maybe $12 (and it's as close to goof-proof plumbing as you can get) A water ...


8

You should update this valve now that you are in there installing a new dishwasher. The dishwasher purchase, "with installation" correctly does not include updating your plumbing. It is extremely easy to replace this valve yourself. The pipe is exposed and in good shape and the old valve uses a compression fitting. Buy a Sharkbite quarter turn ...


20

Capsule summary of the comments: Your old valve should probably be replaced with a new quarter turn ball valve version. Those old valves wear out and break your heart when it really matters. Report the installer to Home Depot. There's a strange, outside chance that they are limited in what they are allowed to do, but I sincerely doubt it.


0

It may be, judging by your red arrow, that you are trying to turn the wrong thing. Do not use an impact wrench. Use two pipe wrenches. It looks like the drain is out at the end of an "arm" of pipe, and if you turn too hard with one wrench or an impact wrench you'll likely damage the area marked as E below. To repack the stem you want to hold A ...


0

I would use heat, your seat is already leaking so a torch would be a better option. Heat applied to the left of the arrow. Depending on the type of valve stem packing you will probably need to replace that also but since you are rebuilding the valve it would be a good idea to re pack it anyway.


1

You can certainly get 1/4-turn (ball-type) shutoff valves. They are arguably better than screw-type valves for the service (they generally do well with being left for years and then used.) Then again, it's impossible to judge the "quality" of your valves from a picture - if they operate correctly and fairly easily, there's no particular need to ...


0

Looks like a plug valve that is missing a handle. So it has 2 'on' and 2 "off" positions in a 360 degree rotation. The handle would indicate the position, on or off. Likely the square flats line up with the plug bore, rather than the diagonals. However, there are many small valve designs and positions would need to be verified by operating the ...


0

You may find a match if you use Google Lens... Download the Google Search Engine App (logo is a G) if you don't have it already > look at the search bar and you'll see two icons, one that looks like a camera - tap that one > take a picture with it and if there is anything out there for sale that looks like what you have, you'll find it.


1

You could try this cartridge identification guide. https://content.interlinebrands.com/product/document/10145/133938_Brochure.pdf


5

Option 1 - better foot valve, or better seal/gasket in the foot valve you have. Option 2 - set up an easy priming solution, if 3 days between pump starts is typical. i.e. have a reserve tank (above the line) for priming with "more than enough" capacity to prime the line, separated from your main tank if you run your main tank empty before refilling,...


2

Replace the foot valve with another newer one and make sure that it is protected by an inlet screen. Some pumps will self prime. Post a picture of your pump so we can see just what kind of pump you have.


0

If you have a modern shower valve with an "anti-scald" feature and are shutting off the water with the shower shut off valve, then turning the water back on is setting up transient swings until the system settles down again. I know these shutoff valves can save water, but I don't think modern shower valves work with them properly. Note that when ...


7

Let's flesh this into an answer. This happens with my kitchen faucet and one of those "quick-flip - not quite total shutoff" valves that screw into the aerator. My guess is that some hot leaks back into the cold pipes, (the control valve is open, the shutoff beyond the control valve is closed) so the mix is not the same temperature as it was until ...


0

Is it possible outside hose bibs are not controlled by the main house shut off? Yes and not totally uncommon I have worked on a few homes that the house main shut off turned off the inside water off, in some cases the house was plumbed that way in others a change once city water replaced well systems. I have a “pickle fork” on a 3’ shaft to close the valves ...


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