Hot answers tagged

5

It's called a pressure reducing valve (PRV) That's a PRV with a shut off and set point. The knob on the bottom is the shut off and the bigger knob with the screw is the set point. Now that you've adjusted it with pressure in the system you may have lowered it and you may need to remove some water to determine the set point. From the picture it looks like ...


4

A coupling and another piece of pipe can be used to tighten a close nipple. You can't grip the threads with a wrench without damaging them. Some nipple extractors only work in one direction, but if the tool is called an "internal pipe wrench" it can work in both directions to tighten or remove a nipple. Sample internal pipe wrench


3

I shut mine off at the entrance to the house, rather than the street. The hot water tank has some elasticity to it, so it will hold a little "pressure" but that will bleed off with a faucet open. If you wish and are able, you can drain down the system by opening a faucet that is lower in elevation than the one you are going to repair. This is usually not ...


3

That type of ball valve is not rebuildable. There is no way to disassemble to get the ball and packing out to replace. Unfortunately, you will be cutting things apart.


3

These are also known as “thermostatic” valves and are used on showers, but also for hot taps in schools, hospitals etc to limit the hot water to a defined safe limit. This is usually around 46 degrees C.


2

That is for PEX-A (Wirsbo/ProPEX/Expansion). Its the expansion type, not the crimp type that is PEX-B, cheaper, and available at big box hardware stores. PEX-A is slightly better for strength and leaching, and is available from supply houses but costs a bit more. The way that PEX-A is, it tries to return to form when expanded, so with a special tool it is ...


2

That's a valve that's lost its handle What you are looking at is the shutoff valve. You simply aren't recognizing it as such because it has lost the handle/knob that you normally turn to actuate the valve. I would try using a pair of pliers to turn the valve for now, and talk to the landlord about getting it replaced (probably with a quarter-turn valve).


2

If that is truly the case as you reported it, something is seriously wrong with the design of your plumbing system and you are mixing hot and cold water all of the time, which would be costing you a fortune in electricity bills. Are you sure it was ALL of the cold water lines that were off? On things like showers, bath faucets and in some places, sinks, ...


2

In the US industrial valves are normally marked " W O G " , for water oil, gas. Ninety degree turn ( on- off) valves are usually called cocks. They are not very effective for throttling which is likely why they are not often used for water ( where one might want to adjust flow). I often use them in water when I want an on/off operation. One advantage is ...


2

It is common/normal for valves to be rated for multiple service types. As such, so long as it is rated/certified/locally acceptable for the type of service it is in, and rated at or above the operating service pressure of the service it's in, it's fine. Locally, I'd be looking for a "NSF-PW" (National Sanitation Foundation - Potable Water) or one of a ...


2

That valve is necessary for whenever you need to service the plumbing inside of the toilet, it turns the water supply off. In the cistern on the other end of that pipe coming from the valve, there is a "fill valve" mechanism of some sort, tied to a float. When the water drops down into the bowl to flush, the float drops and enables the fill valve to refill ...


2

When you turn that style of Moen control, it mixes hot water with cold to adjust the temperature; but first you need to pull out to get the water to flow...


2

This is not your normal gate valve so you might be in luck. Shut the water off at your meter. Clean off the valve and try to unscrew the larger of the two nuts to disassemble the valve. Support the body of the valve so you don't crack the solder joint. There should/could be a washer on the valve stem that you can replace. The smaller nut might have to be ...


2

I usually use an adjustable spanner to hold the body of the valve when tightening, or loosening, any valve. This saves so much hassle as the supply pipe does not get kinked or its joint disturbed. A good tip from the OP in the comments is to remove the knob as this permits a better purchase. I use the type of adjustable spanner with flat parallel jaws ...


2

It does sound like the valve and/or solenoid is bad. You measured 27 volts, but that's only about 10% above the specified value, which is pretty close for a random transformer. The voltage will likely sag as you approach the rated current draw from the transformer, but even if it doesn't that's pretty close.


1

Your previous owner may have used those tablets in the tank that dissolve slowly and release chlorine or sodium hypochlorite (bleach). That tends to attack just about everything over time. The INTENT of those tablets is for the bleach to get down into the BOWL to help keep it clean when you flush. If you seldom flush it, the bleach tablets still dissolve ...


1

Flapper valves in my bathrooms typically last about 2 1/2 years of so. Depending upon the type of material they either get mushy like the ones that you show or they start to get hard and no longer make a good seal. Since I do not add anything to the toilet water tank like a disinfectant or fragrant additive I have to attribute the degradation of the flappers ...


1

It could be used for water, but it is unprotected steel and will corrode. That is why water pipe and fittings are usually galvanized or made of corrosion resistant materials like copper and brass.


1

It broke because of the weight of the expansion tank. Only 5 psi on bladder side means it was full of water and very heavy. You need to support your expansion tank. Pre charge should match static pressure. The pressure does not increase or get higher without expansion tank so "overpressure" is not the cause of the problem. Expansion tanks Don't make pressure....


1

Answer is in the comments to the OP, based on suggestions given there. Summary (but note that I may be calling some things by an incorrect name!): Used a voltmeter to determine the voltage across the solenoid when I hit "cancel/drain" on the control panel. 120V. The solenoid/valve was thus most likely "normal closed". Disconnected the leads to the ...


1

First of all, make sure the valves below the sink are really turned on all the way. Sometimes they get stuck. Second of all, check to see if the tip of your faucet (the part where the water normally shoots out) has a fitting that you can unscrew. Many faucets have a little mesh piece here that can get clogged. It's possible that's your problem (although if ...


1

The picture of your neighbors is a PEX pipe. The first PRV is national pipe thread. The Second one is PEX and it's very easy to do this work. If you're using PEX then the second one is the obvious choice. You need a crimper and a pipe slicer. That's it. That being said, by the time you buy those tools and the PRV you could be pretty close to 600 bucks ...


1

Yes down the drain is good, the condensate is slightly acidic, usually in the 3-5 pH range. The neutralizer is supposed to, well, neutralize it back up to 7 pH but they do wear out or clog. Make sure your condensate doesn't come into contact with metals. It will eat them. Do yourself a favor and always pipe in your neutralizer like this in case it blocks up ...


1

This is a problem with plastic pipe & valves most are not designed to be rebuilt, unfortunately your joints are so close together that you may have to redo several of the valves in the photo. , I usually try to give at least a few inches between fittings if possible for this or frozen pipe fractures so I won't have to replace everything, luckily pvc ...


1

There are no options short of removing the compression stop valve and replacing it, or putting in a short piece of 1/2" OD tubing connected to a new valve with a barbed outlet. threads for compression fittings are not designed to hold any pressure themselves or to mate up to anything other than the compression nut designed for them.


1

Easy fix. You just need a Universal Diverter Handle. Home Depot has several options. Take the old one in with you and they will fix you right up or you can order online.


1

There is no official size for it. As long as the trim can cover it, it's good. I usually use the provided template. That works for most trims. The benefit of the large hole is easy access to the valve in case you need to repair it. For example, my value has 2 screws allowing me to block the water from flowing to the chamber holding the cartridge. If I ...


1

That type of stem requires a friction ring (generally either plastic or fiber) at the valve-body thread shoulder. Ensure there is one present and that it is in good condition. Also make sure that you have not inadvertantly installed two rings, as it is sometimes difficult to notice that an old one is stuck to the valve housing in the wall.


1

Looks like you have a hydronic boiler that is heating your house through multiple zones as well as heating your domestic water via a heat exchanger within the tank to the right. If so, this would be referred to as an indirect fired hot water heater. During the warmer months, the boiler only needs to heat the domestic water as the zone control valves for the ...


1

That is a ball valve that opens/closes with a 1/4 (90) degree turn and YES they are hard to turn. If you want an easier valve to turn, buy one with a longer handle. Valves that screw in use a mechanical advantage, an action similar to a nut and bolt and are easier to turn but take longer to open/close. And, remember there is a stop that only allows the ...


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