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12

You need to drain the water from the heating system, effect the remove and replace, then refill the heating system. Some circulating-water heating systems are filled with tap water from the home's water supply, while others are isolated from the water supply plumbing and are filled with some other liquid. My experience is entirely with the most common tap ...


8

Heating systems can vary by region. I have answered this from a UK perspective as you appear to have bought from B&Q. If the broken part is the white thermostatic cap, then it would be much easier to find a compatible replacement to avoid having to change the valve body. The cap can be removed by undoing the knurled ring directly below it, finger force ...


5

NO , a ball valve only will control flow. If you even allow a slight orifice the size of a human hair with time the chamber pressure would be at 800 psi. I would look for a used scuba regulator they can handle up to 3000 psi and the first stage around 135psi , their actual output pressure can be adjusted a little. I mention this because I used an old ...


4

That whole assembly is the toilet tank fill valve. The float assembly below rises as the tank fills and pushes up the tab that broke. That in turn pushes up the linkage rod and then the lever to turn the water off. I am not sure what made the tab on the float break but possibly the plastic just got super brittle after being exposed to chlorine in the water ...


4

Here is the correct answer to the question as it is written. The copper ring is a ferrule, which is part of a compression fitting. You absolutely need the copper Ferrule for a watertight connection, and plumbers tape is not necessary when this type of connection is installed properly. If you do not know what a copper Farrule is and what a compression ...


3

You can replace the handle but you've probably have to take it off a new valve that you'd buy. No reason to do that though, just wire brush the valve and throw a little rust remover on it. That's the main shutoff and there could have been a leak above it ,maybe on another faucet, that just ran down the pipe before or after the insulation was added. So clean ...


3

Closing the inside main valve to your house should do the trick. If you haven't operated the main valve regularly do so with caution because gate valves are noted for failing when you close them. After doing so, check any faucet to verify the water has been shut off. If you live in a freezing climate you probably have an inside shutoff valve close to the ...


3

Mixing valves could be the problem and depending on the year built or later faucet replacements the kitchen faucet and bathroom faucets are also possible causes. By turning the shutoff valves the guilty valv should be able to be identified.


3

The fix for this might be crazy simple: petroleum jelly (Vaseline, etc). Make sure it's the plain stuff (i.e. not medicated), then take the hose off and smear some around the edges, then fit the hose back on. It's remarkable how well it stops minor leaks like this.


3

That appears to be a gate valve. There is a threaded portion inside the valve that goes inside of a block of metal that moves up and down when you turn the handle. Since you can turn the handle, but the flow of water doesn't seem to increase, the gate has somehow become detached from the screw. Maybe the threads have stripped out, or maybe the screw shaft ...


3

Using the graphite rope isn't as easy as you would think. First off, you need the right size rope that fits in tight with one wrap. You don't use a continuous piece. You cut a piece equal to the circumference and push the rope in and butt joint the ends. Then do it again with another piece of rope and rotate it so the ends don't even up with the previous ...


3

Access door or access panel. You can buy them in various sizes off the shelf, order more sizes, or do it completely DIY by building a frame around a chunk of drywall (or plywood) with screws if you don't access it often, or with hinges and a latch if you need easier access. The bought ones may be plastic or metal.


3

I agree it seems redundant to use anti-siphon valves in combination with a backflow prevention device. But people don't always choose these valves because they needed the anti-siphon feature. Maybe the person who chose them just doesn't like operating or maintaining valves that are underground (harder to bend and reach) in a box full of spider webs. They ...


3

What is your water pressure? Do you have an expansion tank? Lack of a (working) expansion tank is the most common cause of overpressure releases (meaning the valve is doing what it's supposed to do, not malfunctioning.) Heated water is physically larger than unheated water, and pressure can rise due to that if no water is being used. Extension makes no ...


2

It does sound like the valve and/or solenoid is bad. You measured 27 volts, but that's only about 10% above the specified value, which is pretty close for a random transformer. The voltage will likely sag as you approach the rated current draw from the transformer, but even if it doesn't that's pretty close.


2

Mine is a centerset type bar sink faucet that had been in place for about 22 years. The cartridge nuts are recessed into the base, so not accessible except with a socket wrench. I didn't have a deep socket so I tried a spark plug wrench. It fit. The first try was not successful, so I soaked the treads with WD40 for a few minutes. Then I attached the ...


2

My cold side cartridge needed replacement. (My valve assembly has manufacture date of 2007.) I have a number of same Kohler Lavatory sets and have had to replace a few valve assemblies a few times. Kohler has sent me entire retrofit valve set because many times, as was described in prior comments, it's difficult to break the seal of the top nut to get at and ...


2

It's likely best to turn off both the water and gas supply. Risking running your water heater dry is not worth it.


2

1) Is there any purpose for this valve other than for removing the pressure gauge? NO, the valve is only there for isolation of the gauge. Gauges like that have a high failure rate (for various reasons) and often need to be replaced "on the run"; that is, while the boiler is still in operation. 2) Is this a huge/expensive/messy accident waiting to ...


2

That looks like a standard multi turn valve it should look square further inside or have splines, if nether of these are true you have an issue that I found on one house I had to flip, i thought someone had cut off the valve stem , why I don’t know , but since the end of the shaft is clean , no hack saw or dremel cut off disks or other grinder marks it ...


2

Figured it out! The upstairs bathroom valve controls the outside spigot on the back of the house. The valve in our master bathroom controls the outside spigot on the front of the house. Thanks for all the help and comments.


2

The cadmium ( possibly zinc) coating has corroded off the steel handle ; this was caused by being wet. It should be easy enough to replace the handle although you may need to buy a similar valve just to get a handle . To clean the rust and coat the old handle you will need to remove the handle anyway. By taking the old handle with you to a store , you should ...


2

A pipe wrench holding the exposed portion of the nipple should allow you to remove the valve without loosening the joint in the wall. But be sure to inspect the condition of the pipe. This appears to be galvanized steel pipe which rusts over time. If the pipe appears to be rusted severely or is filled with scale, you may want to replace it and even the ...


2

Get yourself an elbow that you can add to the faucet to have better access. Photo courtesy Home Depot


2

You either have a useless tub taking up space, or you do what needs doing to fix it so it's useable. You may also have a claim against your "home inspector" for not catching it - that sort of thing is exactly why you wasted money to hire them, after all. I would go in prepared to "break tile" (more likely I'd cut it out, actually - it's neater, and I'm not ...


2

The reason you don't have a union is that the previous installer assumed you would simply unsolder the elbow when you needed to replace the threaded valve. That's pretty much what they had to have done (well, really just solder the elbow after the threads were tight, the first time it was assembled.) So, you can learn to solder and try to squeeze a union in ...


2

It's a pneumatic valve https://www.wolseley.co.uk/product/sv93467-pneumatic-dual-flow-valve-15-pc93209-44/ according to this page: https://plumbsparesdirect.com/store/sv93467-dual-flush-valve If the flush valve is letting by water into the pan the most likely problem is that the flush valve washer has failed To replace the Ideal Standard flush seal ...


2

Easiest fix - You have leaking packing (the seal around the valve stem) since it leaks only when open. Tighten the packing nut - hold the valve body still with one wrench so it does not try to twist the pipes while using another wrench to tighten the nut between the valve body and the valve handle (the "packing nut") If that does not fix it, shut off the ...


2

FIXED! The problem was these little buggers inside the shark bites. Don’t know why the handy man use shark bite instead of soldering, but those little plastic bits were restricting the flow enough to shoot everything right up to the shower. Removed them, replaced everything, now the tub works as it should. Holy smokes!


2

What about a "Pythagorean cup" style of device? from Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pythagorean_cup The cup consists of a bowl with a tube in an inverted U-shape. Once the bowl fills beyond the top of the U-tube (step C above) it starts a siphon which drains the volume of the bowl until the siphon breaks. As long as the siphon flow is ...


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