3

Red Rosin Paper (which is a bit old-school, but can still be found) would fill the bill, I believe. It's plant based. Seems to be getting sold for floors now, but was the thing people used before housewrap on exterior walls under siding. However, depending on type and installation of insulation, all you really need is an airspace between the insulation and ...


3

The problem is that if there is an issue with the product at some point in the future, the manufacturer will deny any warranty claim because the installation instructions were not followed. If this were mine, I'd insist that the installer follow the instructions for the products regardless of what everyone else does.


2

Professional flooring installers would flood from the high point to the low point with self level. They typically charge per bag and I've seen this kind of job cost 15k when done for more than one level of a house. You can do as you suggest a hybrid approach. Installers won't typically go that route because it is a lot more labor and requires a lot more ...


2

One method, like in this YouTube video, would be to use heat bond carpet seaming tape. Pro carpet installers use it with a special iron to seam carpet together, but you can use a clothes iron since you will be working on the back side. This would give a strong bond but you will still need a rug pad to keep it from sliding around. (The heat seal tape has a ...


2

Luan plywood tends to have a ton of resin and other chemicals in it (due mostly to the species of wood used). This can leach out and stain tile grout or vinyl flooring (or cause adhesive issues due to salts, etc.). It's a very soft plywood, so it may not have enough rigidity to support the floor and prevent dents. It tends to have voids in the interior ...


2

I think it would totally impossible to get good results using that method. LVT is pretty flexible. I've remodeled a rental house and personally (not a contractor) installed LVT. It turned out pretty good, but I did need a leveling compound for part of the floor. Our church also replaced a bunch of carpet in the hallways with LVT and the installer missed a ...


1

Laying the new floor perpendicular to the old floor will eliminate any cupping issues. Low areas can be filled with self leveling compound. I like to use a pad between flooring if a floating floor the pad gives a better feel , helps isolate small divots and is warmer due to the pads insulation value. With all that said renting a big drum sander and ...


1

You should probably understand the root cause of the hump (settling? rest of the floor going down for some reason? built that way?). Assuming it is dimensional lumber (not modern i-joists), I'd only consider cutting the subfloor up and planing the joists. You won't change the strength materially by lopping off a max of 5/8". You won't have to mess with ...


1

Two things here. If you don't want squeaks... First you should remove plywood and add blocking to the joists. The swaying of the joists, even slight allows the screws to move and eventually squeaks. Second you need to glue the first layer of plywood down. Your calculations are off - kind of by a lot - AND you are committing poor design thoughts at ...


1

If I understand your question correctly, you have attempted to install a roofing underlayment sheet material from the inside/underside of the wood roof membrane in an attempt to prevent rain from getting in the attic. That type of sheet material is designed to be applied to the exterior side of the wood roof membrane, under whatever final roof treatment (...


1

Movement is normal. You have three choices and I usually use a combo of all of them on a room like this. Live with it and just fix the room every couple rows. You should have room to just push it back in place especially your first few rows. Have a person securing the rows a few feet away from you while you knock the boards into place. They can use ...


1

As Mike answered above. It's normal for the first couple of rows to move around a bit, you just need to use lots of packers at all edges to 'hold' it in place. The more flooring you get down, the better the packers will hold it in place. You don't need any chalk lines, laminate is incredibly accurate once two or three rows are clicked together.


1

Last time I did this I put wedges along the long side to stop the floor moving, once complete they were removed to allow proper expansion and the gap around the edge was covered.


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