Hot answers tagged

46

Edit: This is sounding more and more like a problem with either a neighbor's electrical or the utility's supply. See last entry. DON'T get in that hot tub again! The "very small" shock was due to high impedance between you and the current. Impedance is extremely luck-based. Someone getting out of the pool might splash water where it had not been before, ...


46

You got a bad roll of the dice. Very good ideas and attempts that would work in more normal soil conditions. The problem is, if you continue then you will likely undermine the soil because that small rock will fall into the hole from the sides. That will be very difficult to back fill properly and over time it will settle and form a slight ditch / depression....


46

The purpose is to allow natural light into the room. Generally these room-to-room windows are used for rooms which have no external wall, and so cannot have a “normal” (outside) window. The risk of someone “spying” on you through a window is true for all windows. Although hopefully you trust the people who live in your house more than the general population, ...


40

In the US, no the USB ports will not have power when the outlet is not powered. Most outlets in the US don't have power switches on them, so if you switch them off there is no way for power to be provided. In the UK, outlets often have power switches. In that case, your USB ports are usually powered while the outlet switches are off. This is because the ...


38

I think you have likely answered your own question. The use of an extension cord could cause a voltage drop, especially since the factory cord is long already and the spa probably has an electric motor that would be damaged by voltage drop. Also, cord/plug connections are not weatherproof. This is a CYA (cover-your-arse) by the manufacturer. Your plan of ...


33

Change your wiring method You started with non-metallic jacketed cable, requiring 500mm of cover. That's similar to the US where cover must be 24" for that type of cable. However, the US has other wiring methods that only require 6" cover. (e.g. 150mm). This involves a tough metal conduit that you can't pierce with a shovel blade. The pipe is pricy but ...


31

It was probably installed to reduce sound transmission. It's common to see materials that are more dense than fiberglass used as acoustic insulation, but fiberglass is used as well. The sounds of water running and being flushed, drawers being closed, and other... human activities are often something folks wish to reduce in areas designed for serenity, such ...


30

Is it supposed to be like that? There needs to be air circulation in unheated space to prevent condensation causing rot. It's freezing up there That is good. It means your loft insulation is working. I'm more concerned about animals entering the house. I found fixing wire-mesh externally to any small gaps at the top of the walls keeps unwelcome ...


30

Obviously, safety considerations like isolating that circuit are paramount, and note that even if that circuit's breaker is off, then the neutral touching earth can still trip the Earth Leakage Circuit Breaker... Find the socket / box that that wire goes to, disconnect it, then pull it out from the other end (which you need to find - either in the roof ...


30

The basic reason is that if they said, "Feel free to use an extension cord", someone would connect up a 50m, 3A, two-core cable with no Earth and a loose socket. They would then sue the company when it didn't work (too much voltage drop across long thin extension cables) or it caught fire (current drawn exceeds capability of thin extension cables) or they ...


28

I applaud your effort at frugality and environmentalism. The "throwaway" mindset peeves me to no end. Many folks change out fixtures just to change the look or size, and there are plenty of good units to be had. In fact, I'll soon be swapping out a perfectly serviceable round-bowl toilet for an elongated one just to better accommodate an add-on bidet. Some ...


20

Too narrow to be practical in soil with normal obstacles. Some may advise renting machinery, though most typical "trenchers" are likely to have an expensive "oops" when they meet your buried debris. So if you rent equipment, you'll want a mini-excavator. For a 7m (~23ft) long trench, I'd suggest (& probably have on several other questions) the good ...


20

Let me tell you a story about insurance companies and how they will screw you. First, before you call your insurance company to report an accident, call them and ask for a policy review to see if your particular loss is covered. If it is not hang up and do not report the loss. Here is what happened to me. I assumed that the loss that I had would be covered ...


16

I have dug hundreds of trench’s in my life and never seen one so narrow , wow. I use a narrow spade maybe 6” to 8” or . 2 meters wide to go down 18” max, and a full width of 10” or .25m wide to go down 24” or . 6 . I am amazed that the ground is holding. The deeper I have to dig the wider I make the trench . Even with a machine I usually dig at least 6” &...


15

Given the size and location of the wire, It looks like you hit the range feed which may draw upto 50 amps. Such high current applications require greater care in making connections such as splices. in general there are two safe approaches to repairing this damage. The easiest but most expensive (since you have conduit and assuming that it is continuous) is ...


15

I had an electrician to check out the problem and: I am in the UK and there is only live and neutral at the meter (earth and neutral are the same wire at that point) The Hot Tub water is directly conncted to Earth The mains electrics in my property all checked out fine, incoming supply fine. No faults with the Hob Tub RCD's tested and working He is ...


15

What I would do ( have done) is replace the elbow with a "T" and add a valve to be opened in winter . Presumably the valve will be below grade and will need something like a sprinkler valve box. I have a few similar drain valves in my sprinkler system.


14

In my last house, (in U.K.), I took out a stramit block wall from a bedroom, and replaced it with thermalite blocks. Since the bedroom was dark-ish, I built a narrow double-glazed strip (something like 18" x 6') into the top of the wall. It could have been frosted glass - but even my bathroom windows were clear. That was into a corridor where there was ...


12

This is not really suitable for LEDs. Not only is the wattage too low, but since the switch has no direct neutral connection, it gets its power by trickling a small current through the light. With an incandescent light, the power would be so low that you wouldn’t notice it lighting at all when off. However, with most LEDs, you would probably notice a dim ...


12

The reason it bursts is because inside the tap is a non-return valve which is required to comply with water regulations. The valve stops the tap draining. In this instance it is better to fit a tap without the non-return valve and instead fit a separate on inside the property next to your isolating valve. Your plumber will be able to do this when he repairs ...


11

Insulated crimped connections are allowed in the UK, and considered maintenance-free so they can be concealed. A proper ratchet crimper is essential. The whole should then be wrapped in self-amalgamating tape.


11

Having done this to pull 40A 220v back to my workshop, you're digging too narrow a trench. Get a shovel out and dig the trench at least the shovel-width. You're going to want to go down at least 18" (to get below the frost line). Wrap some tape around the shovel handle at your desired depth, and use that to measure progress. My house has been on the lot ...


9

I have always heard that the reason for the "no extension chords" is because they are not supposed to be used for permanent installations, only temporary, i.e., Christmas lights. Extension chords are pretty cheaply made and the ones I have had fail on me always fail at either the male or female end. If you're going to keep your tub inflated year-round, think ...


9

To add to @matt's answer, it is specifically for extra natural light in otherwise dark corridors. In a small British terraced house, there is generally a corridor between rooms on the first floor to allow access to bedrooms, bathrooms etc, without having to do through another room. This is common in Victorian (1800s) and Edwardian (early 1900s) terraced ...


8

My answer assumes you are certain there's nothing significant or structural buried under there and it's just backfilled with construction waste over the years. As a kid I dug my fair share of trenches on the family farm for various reasons, but I'm no expert here. I think the answer is just a pick mattock aka pick axe hoe (with a pointy side and a slightly ...


8

The manufacturer will be guarding against both voltage drop on the supply (which could affect the operation) and creating too high a fault loop impedance (which could affect the disconnect time of the circuit breaker in case of a fault). At a guess, a minimum length, heavy duty extension lead will likely be fine. However, for peace of mind, if you can ...


8

The issue is electrical drownings One thing people really don't understand about electricity and water: a shock that would be trivial anywhere else is fatal when water is around. You're hit with a triple whammy. First, ordinary water and wet skin conduct electricity well, meaning a shock you barely felt before, now has much worse effect. "Water doesn'...


8

The load will be transferred to the supports mostly based on how you stack it, not how the sheets are laid. OSB has a dedicated (and labeled) strength axis. It's normally lengthwise with the sheet. While your OSB may be thick enough that it doesn't much matter, it's almost never appropriate to run it parallel to the joists. If you don't have a compelling ...


7

I am a British Electrician and I have lived in the USA. when I first saw and used wire nuts in the USA, I was horrified. Frankly, the wiring standards and codes in the USA are lax compared with those in the UK and the domestic wiring is pretty amateurish. Examples. In the USA, 110v power outlets are allowed in bathrooms. Pull cord light switches are ...


7

Transformer, rectifier, regulator - aka, a USB power supply. There are, of course, the small switching supplies that plug in, as seen as phone, ipad, ipod (or any other USB device) chargers. I know that there are power outlets (ac) with built-in USB outlets available for the USA system - depending on the speed and conservatism of the UK electric regulators,...


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