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10

Now that I see your photo I'd do this differently. I'd install a vertical cleat just behind the faceframe on each side of the cabinet, maybe 1" back (the thickness of the plate plus 1/4"). I'd then span a sheet of 3/4" plywood across them, creating a solid face on which to install your mount. You should have either a cabinet wall or framing to screw into. ...


7

I agree with unhandledexcepsean--I would use lag bolts for larger TVs. Some flat screens will be fine with the wood screws through the drywall into the stud not using the plastic expanding anchor. I have seen some smaller mounts where 4 of the plastic anchors into drywall are supposed to work but I do not like those at all. Since you have at least 1 stud, ...


7

Of course it's illegal to run power cords inside walls. National Electrical Code 400.8 rolls through the things you can't do with cord, and it's mostly a list of schemes to use them as a substitute for the permanent wiring of a structure. Nope, just nope. Data cables, on the other hand, can go right into the wall cavity. Punch a hole in the drywall and ...


5

Living and working as a cable television technician in a beachside region, I can attest to the value of the silicone dielectric grease for improving the lifespan of these connections. Salt air eats everything in time, yet the grease prevented corrosion after five years. The fittings were assembled with "boots," rubber covers which resemble spark plug wiring ...


5

You need a long, flexible auger bit. I have this model and found it invaluable when I need to add a new cable inside the wall. The kit has a 90 degree handle that fits on the shaft and lets you bend it to fit through the wall opening to reach the bottom or top of the stud bay and drill through. This forum page gives a nice rundown and pictures of the bit in ...


4

Two possible issues come to mind: The larger screen will not physically fit in the tv wall mount The leverage of the larger screen can tear out the fixings (torque = force * distance).


3

You do not need to be concerned, assuming that your lag screw is anchored into the framing. That's a result of a pre-existing gap behind the drywall. Maybe some insulation or a wrinkle in the vapor barrier held it out during initial hanging, and your lag screw pulled it in tight. Because there was a drywall screw there holding it out the surface bulged as ...


3

Well... it looks like the silly USB wired keyboard was the culprit. I made it a point to disconnect it after I use it and the TV hasn't turned on since. One time it came on and I thought it wasn't the keyboard but when I went to turn it off I noticed the keyboard was connected. Weird how a passive USB keyboard would make the TV turn on. Hope this helps ...


3

No need to go through a lot of unnecessary structural changes. I would install a Base-Mounted Television Stand using bolt/nut/washer through the shelf. Depending on the size of the television you are mounting, you might even be able to store the television inside the shadow box. Note: This particular stand will withstand 25 pounds. A Samsung 48" Smart ...


3

Code aside, the hottest thing in our living-room after the woodburner itself is the area directly above the wood-burner. I don't think this is a good place for any electronics, as most electronics generate heat of their own. Typically they dump these using heatsinks (large lumps of metal that quickly spread the heat over a wide area, like a radiator on a car ...


3

Some choices: Cut the drywall above or below the horizontal and drill a hole through it. Get a long reach spade or auger bit and drill a hole from the existing hole in your drywall.


2

You'll want a splitter where the -db is smaller. The bigger the -#, or smaller, the more signal that is lost. I personally choose a -3.5 splitters and run 1 specifically to the modem and then the other to another splitter for the tvs. It starts at 0 from the orange cable. There is good article over at http://eqrunner.com/CrewNotes/CNCoaxsplitter.php that ...


2

As long as you are getting an acceptable signal level at the router, replacing the six-way splitter with a coupler won't accomplish much. You can tell via a speed test, which is readily available on the web. However, reliability will be improved by replacement. If you install the coupler, save the splitter for possible future applications


2

So this entertainment center is actually all hanging from the wall, not sitting on the floor and anchored to the wall to protect from tip-over? If so, given the weight (perhaps 250 lbs. but the time you are done with everything), I would NOT rely on drywall anchors of any type but would much prefer to anchor directly into the metal studs. Getting into metal ...


2

There are two problems here. Gnarly connector ends don't like going down conduit First, you are trying to get the gnarly end of a lumpy cord-with-connector to come through on its own. That's not realistic. You need to get something practical to come through. If it were really smurf-tube all the way through, I would say "tissue tied to string, using ...


2

Vacuum a string through the conduit. Literally put a vacuum cleaner sucking on one end and feed string in the other until it comes out. Then PULL the wires (all of them, at once) into the conduit with the string. That works easier if you make the front end of the cable bundle somewhat smooth as you attach the string, generally by wrapping tape to cover the ...


2

The photo you posted of connection on the back of your TV is odd. I do not recognize the connector labeled antenna, the connector for the satellite is a coaxial F connection and that is what typical antenna connectors are in the USA. Do you have the manual for the TV, can you tell us the model number. Possible your tv came with an adapter for this It is ...


1

Depends on the weight of the TV and the type of mount. A lag bolt with similar inside diameter would have higher wood holding retention, but might not fit through the hardware on the TV, as the screw threads are typically much wider. I would not drive these directly into a wooden stud. The screw thread is too fine, and the outer half inch would only be ...


1

If you want to remove it cleanly you will probably need a drill and a stripped screw extractor bit (grabit combination drill and extractor, twist drill bit, or screw extractor). You might have luck with vise pliers but it all depends on the head size and how much is initially exposed.


1

Inside an LCD TV, there are effectively just a few major components: LCD matrix Backlight Power supply Backlight driver (aka, high voltage power supply) Main board Video board T-Con board Speakers Buttons IR Receiver Some of these items may be combined with others (control board and video board might be the same) or not used (backlight driver usually only ...


1

It sounds to me like your outlet or receptacle is loose and needs replacing. If you have the plug in and twist to put some side pressure on the plug will it work? If so it’s time for a new outlet.


1

Sony TVs all use an IR sensor for the remote, so a naughty neighbor cannot be doing that in this case. But do you have a cable / internet box that then controls the TV? If so, many of those have remote access via the web, and your random operation may be indicative of someone having hacked your box, especially if it is a box for a streaming service that is ...


1

Your two options are to attach the TV mount to one stud (try to hit the center of the stud) or mount a board to the wall that hits more than one stud and then attach the TV mount to that (or get a TV mount made to pick up more than one stud). For larger TV's I would want to hit at least two studs. I looked up a random 43" TV on Amazon and it's weight was ...


1

First thing to check is that you are using a hammer-Action Drill or Impact Action Drill. the Rotary/Immpact drill is much more powerful for drilling holes in walls (cinder/concrete/brick) but not so cool as a general all purpose drill, since they use special SDS bits which dont scale to small drill sizes very well. once you have one of those drills, make ...


1

You could be dealing with a vertical cell filled with concrete or a vertical piece of rebar. If you are not using a hammer drill, try that first and see if it starts going deeper. If not, take a loot at the hammer drill bit and see if it looks like it's dulling. If it is, you will need to try a Carbide Rebar Drill Bit.


1

I'd get a stud finder with electrical finder. They come in handy and give a general idea if there is wire running horizontally/vertically. I'd stay with the longer screws. The horizontal wire from what I've seen is generally ran a foot or 2 off the floor for receptacles so I don't think you'll have to worry about it unless behind the wall is a kitchen and ...


1

I see no real reason to add in the new stud box to allow for the TV signal cables to have their own cavity. You should be able to simply mount the flange on oneside of the backbox to the stud and use some type of toggle anchor to simply attach the other flange of the box to the drywall. Using this technique you should be able to simply cut two holes in the ...


1

I am sure the mount would work in that the TV wouldn't fall off the wall. However you might not be happy with the length of the articulating arm. If the arm is short, and the TV is wide, you won't be able to turn it left and right like you want to.


1

I have never used it and am not familiar with the ingredients of that product but generally where RF is concerned you do not want to add something that was not already called for in its application. You said the connectors are water-resistant (water proof is hard but not impossible). Adding anything at all will introduce performance changes and not for the ...


1

By eliminating the splitter your signal will be stronger at the modem. The question will be do you need a stronger signal?


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