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10

A bunch of ways to do this. What I would probably do myself, which is not what you are currently planning, is: Cut a piece of plywood, probably 3/4" thick, 24" tall by ~ 20" (studs 16" apart) or ~ 28" (studs 24" apart). Mount the plywood with 3 screws on each stud. Paint the plywood to match the wall. It doesn't have to be perfect because it will be mostly ...


9

Electrically, you can go either way Attaching to the push connector or attaching to the backstabs or screws is 3 of one, half dozen of the other. I mean, backstabs (and push connectors) are known to be unreliable, so you take your chances of having an hours-long, frustrating bug hunt. Screws are more reliable, but you must torque them adequately. A ...


8

No, you can not mount the TV the way you have described. Since you want the TV to articulate out from the wall, most of the force will be pull-out instead of shear. The barn boards are not attached to the wall in such a way to support your TV. It's likely you would rip the barn boards right off the wall, or break one where you drill for the toggle bolts. ...


7

If you insist on opening the wall, which seems rather foolish to me considering the other options available, I wouldn't install a full-height stud. I'd keep the destruction to a minimum and enjoy a better outcome as a result Open a section of wall slightly taller than the TV mount bracket and to the center of each adjacent stud. Add cross-blocks between ...


7

I agree with unhandledexcepsean--I would use lag bolts for larger TVs. Some flat screens will be fine with the wood screws through the drywall into the stud not using the plastic expanding anchor. I have seen some smaller mounts where 4 of the plastic anchors into drywall are supposed to work but I do not like those at all. Since you have at least 1 stud, ...


5

You need a long, flexible auger bit. I have this model and found it invaluable when I need to add a new cable inside the wall. The kit has a 90 degree handle that fits on the shaft and lets you bend it to fit through the wall opening to reach the bottom or top of the stud bay and drill through. This forum page gives a nice rundown and pictures of the bit in ...


3

I would cleat the mounting using horizontal 2x4s or some thicker plywood mounted on the surface of the wall. It's less sightly, but you can distribute the weight along more studs. I would not try to mount it across only 2 studs using 1.5" screws.


3

Some choices: Cut the drywall above or below the horizontal and drill a hole through it. Get a long reach spade or auger bit and drill a hole from the existing hole in your drywall.


3

You do not need to be concerned, assuming that your lag screw is anchored into the framing. That's a result of a pre-existing gap behind the drywall. Maybe some insulation or a wrinkle in the vapor barrier held it out during initial hanging, and your lag screw pulled it in tight. Because there was a drywall screw there holding it out the surface bulged as ...


3

Well... it looks like the silly USB wired keyboard was the culprit. I made it a point to disconnect it after I use it and the TV hasn't turned on since. One time it came on and I thought it wasn't the keyboard but when I went to turn it off I noticed the keyboard was connected. Weird how a passive USB keyboard would make the TV turn on. Hope this helps ...


2

There are two problems here. Gnarly connector ends don't like going down conduit First, you are trying to get the gnarly end of a lumpy cord-with-connector to come through on its own. That's not realistic. You need to get something practical to come through. If it were really smurf-tube all the way through, I would say "tissue tied to string, using ...


2

Vacuum a string through the conduit. Literally put a vacuum cleaner sucking on one end and feed string in the other until it comes out. Then PULL the wires (all of them, at once) into the conduit with the string. That works easier if you make the front end of the cable bundle somewhat smooth as you attach the string, generally by wrapping tape to cover the ...


2

The photo you posted of connection on the back of your TV is odd. I do not recognize the connector labeled antenna, the connector for the satellite is a coaxial F connection and that is what typical antenna connectors are in the USA. Do you have the manual for the TV, can you tell us the model number. Possible your tv came with an adapter for this It is ...


2

Yes, you can connect to the push-on connectors, or to the outlet. Connecting to the push-on connectors is the best approach. However, I don't see where the ground wire originates, so you will need to address that. You can not attach the new ground to the outlet.


2

I only know of two solutions to this problem, and they may or may not work for you depending on a few details Run Wire If you have carpet, there is normally a small gap between the wall and the trim and the tack strip where you can just fit a coax cable or ethernet cable. This is the trick I always used in apartments since modification to the walls was ...


1

You can poke a hole in the wall and push the cable through the hole , no box is required (this is how a cable company will do it), I usually use a low voltage ring like a wbf-1 this provides a way to mount a cover plate. Make sure to seal the entry cable and hole with a quality silicone sealer. Your needs for a TV cable box depends on what you have ...


1

If you mean anything remotely like a "modern" TV, (flat panel with VESA mounting holes on the back) it's trivial - just screw a "ceiling mount" to the bottom of the stairs. Get one which allows for an angle adjustment - most do.


1

There are options here; you could avoid opening the wall if you don't mind looking at some supporting structure on the exposed wall behind the TV. I am assuming you want to avoid that for the sake of the finished appearance. It very well may look nicer that way. But if you want to use a single-stud style mount, that is going to mean opening up the wall....


1

It interferes least with the electrical and cabling if you screw a piece of flat piece of 26 ga. sheet metal with cut outs for electrical flat to the studs, just behind the drywall. Then mount TV bracket using toggles.


1

Yes you could connect to the connector or the receptacle, but I wouldn't go to the receptacle when an opening is available on the connector. Actually I never spliced through a receptacle in a commercial project (which I assume this is because of the data jack). For me it would be pretty hard to fish Armor Clad cable into the box and properly ground in the ...


1

It definitely looks like there's an extra slot on those connectors so you could use those. You could connect your new cable to the extra screws on the outlet if the existing connectors won't hold an additional wire. The existing cable looks like #12 BX so check codes if you're thinking of using Romex. Good luck


1

TVs are lighter than they used to be, a 65" TV is only 55 pounds or so, and 2" screws are pretty darn strong. (You probably want 2" screws - you have to get through the drywall, too.) I am going to assume that the drywall is on 2x4's used as furring strips, solidly attached to the wall, capable of supporting the weight of the mounted TV. I would not ...


1

Depends on the weight of the TV and the type of mount. A lag bolt with similar inside diameter would have higher wood holding retention, but might not fit through the hardware on the TV, as the screw threads are typically much wider. I would not drive these directly into a wooden stud. The screw thread is too fine, and the outer half inch would only be ...


1

If you want to remove it cleanly you will probably need a drill and a stripped screw extractor bit (grabit combination drill and extractor, twist drill bit, or screw extractor). You might have luck with vise pliers but it all depends on the head size and how much is initially exposed.


1

Inside an LCD TV, there are effectively just a few major components: LCD matrix Backlight Power supply Backlight driver (aka, high voltage power supply) Main board Video board T-Con board Speakers Buttons IR Receiver Some of these items may be combined with others (control board and video board might be the same) or not used (backlight driver usually only ...


1

It sounds to me like your outlet or receptacle is loose and needs replacing. If you have the plug in and twist to put some side pressure on the plug will it work? If so it’s time for a new outlet.


1

There are probably king/jack studs on each side of the window plus a sill and a header. Your magnetic stud finder might not be strong enough to go through the plaster. They're good for finding drywall screws covered by joint compound but that's about it. So you either buy a more expensive stud finder or start drilling really small holes hoping to find the ...


1

Sony TVs all use an IR sensor for the remote, so a naughty neighbor cannot be doing that in this case. But do you have a cable / internet box that then controls the TV? If so, many of those have remote access via the web, and your random operation may be indicative of someone having hacked your box, especially if it is a box for a streaming service that is ...


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