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30

Absolutely no problem. The screws (actually called "lag bolts") bite into the wood immediately around them, and the wood fibers around that hold the bolt in place. Yes the holes you made already weaken the fibers immediately around them but the amount is insignificant. And, for a flat screen TV like you're describing, the weight you'll be putting on ...


20

There are wall plates that are designed for your situation. Power For power, you can add the socket as you described. Low voltage For HDMI/signal/etc low voltage stuff, there are a number of options. Running conduit is the best for future flexibility. I personally like just having a cable sticking out of the wall, rather than putting connectors ...


10

Now that I see your photo I'd do this differently. I'd install a vertical cleat just behind the faceframe on each side of the cabinet, maybe 1" back (the thickness of the plate plus 1/4"). I'd then span a sheet of 3/4" plywood across them, creating a solid face on which to install your mount. You should have either a cabinet wall or framing to screw into. ...


7

Of course it's illegal to run power cords inside walls. National Electrical Code 400.8 rolls through the things you can't do with cord, and it's mostly a list of schemes to use them as a substitute for the permanent wiring of a structure. Nope, just nope. Data cables, on the other hand, can go right into the wall cavity. Punch a hole in the drywall and ...


7

I agree with unhandledexcepsean--I would use lag bolts for larger TVs. Some flat screens will be fine with the wood screws through the drywall into the stud not using the plastic expanding anchor. I have seen some smaller mounts where 4 of the plastic anchors into drywall are supposed to work but I do not like those at all. Since you have at least 1 stud, ...


6

According to this source, which unfortunately does not cite its own sources, the following considerations are needed when drilling into studs: Holes in bearing wall studs (exterior and interior walls that bear the weight of the roof and/or other stories above) may not exceed 40 percent of the width of the stud. Notches in bearing wall studs may not ...


5

Why you shouldn't use NM cable NM-B cable (Romex®) is not designed to be used as a flexible cord, and must be properly secured and supported. It's also not rated for use where it may be exposed to physical damage. Flexible cords have thicker jackets, which are designed to hold up to a bit more abuse. They also contain stranded wires, which hold up to ...


5

Plan 2 (solid plywood) for the win. That kind of weight (with extra leverage) would be terrible in just drywall with a single stud. Speaking of leverage, if you can consider making the strip of ply a little taller (like, 2'), it should be a little more solid. (Admittedly, this might be overkill.) In addition to getting the plywood into at least 2 studs, you'...


5

Living and working as a cable television technician in a beachside region, I can attest to the value of the silicone dielectric grease for improving the lifespan of these connections. Salt air eats everything in time, yet the grease prevented corrosion after five years. The fittings were assembled with "boots," rubber covers which resemble spark plug wiring ...


4

You need to attach the mount to the concrete, not the drywall. There are special anchors for concrete. Most are made of metal and expand into the hole drilled in the concrete with a hammer drill and a masonry bit. Most masonry anchors are sleeve anchors and use bolts (also called machine screws) to expand the anchor. There are also metal lag shields that ...


4

It sounds like you have solid 13/16" thick plywood for a wall. If that is the case, I'd drill holes matching holes in the mount all the way through, get four metal bolts, four matching nuts and eight washers, and hang the mount on the wall, securing with nuts from the opposite side of the wall and using threadlocker on bolt threads. You would have nuts ...


4

Use toggles, but also put at least one good fastener into the stud. (Even if you have to drill a new hole/holes in the mount.)


4

According to the manual, the AV output section has L and R audio outputs that you could connect to an audio amplifier. The "Video" connector will be composite video, the L and R audio outputs will be typical phono (AKA RCA) connectors at audio "line" levels. Twin phono to twin phono cable used for stereo audio (Red is Right channel) and triple phono to ...


4

Two possible issues come to mind: The larger screen will not physically fit in the tv wall mount The leverage of the larger screen can tear out the fixings (torque = force * distance).


3

Most every mount I've seen has several holes through which it can be secured to studs. This is to account for different stud spacing, as well as allow for several lateral positions so that the TV is not off center. Double check your mount instructions, to ensure it will not accommodate your stud spacing. I'm very suspicious that the mount says it must be ...


3

OTA DTV antenna cable is commonly RG6 (replaced RG59). This is a 75 ohm coaxial cable with an F or BNC termination (probably F). The better quality component video cables use 3 separate RG6 cables with RCA connectors at the end. They are simply attached together in a bundle. My original answer assumed this is what you had. With the picture you've added it ...


3

This is how it is meant to be mounted. The plastic cabinet does not support any weight. If you put a large washer, or cardboard over the plastic cabinet without using a spacer, then you run a chance of crushing the plastic of the cabinet when you tighten the bolts.


3

Code aside, the hottest thing in our living-room after the woodburner itself is the area directly above the wood-burner. I don't think this is a good place for any electronics, as most electronics generate heat of their own. Typically they dump these using heatsinks (large lumps of metal that quickly spread the heat over a wide area, like a radiator on a car ...


3

No need to go through a lot of unnecessary structural changes. I would install a Base-Mounted Television Stand using bolt/nut/washer through the shelf. Depending on the size of the television you are mounting, you might even be able to store the television inside the shadow box. Note: This particular stand will withstand 25 pounds. A Samsung 48" Smart ...


3

You do not need to be concerned, assuming that your lag screw is anchored into the framing. That's a result of a pre-existing gap behind the drywall. Maybe some insulation or a wrinkle in the vapor barrier held it out during initial hanging, and your lag screw pulled it in tight. Because there was a drywall screw there holding it out the surface bulged as ...


2

This is pretty standard double-stud, used in this case to provide some extra support for the framing around your fireplace. You should install like with a regular stud, and do not try to guide your screw between the two studs. The two studs are probably just nailed together in a few spots, and a screw driven in between them could spread them apart. You ...


2

Go to your local hardware store and ask for help finding aluminum or bronze sleeves (bushings) like so: They should be the same length as (or slightly shorter than) the thickness of your brackets. They'll fill the gap between your screws and the bracket holes. Also get some suitable washers to enlarge the screw heads.


2

You haven't told us what mount you're referring to, but most aren't designed for specific stud centers. Instead, they have a range of available mounting area (and many will accommodate 24" centers as well). It's very likely that your mount will work just fine on 12" centers. You should be able to put a tape measure on the mount and verify. Can you position ...


2

The best way to deal with this problem is to first mount a suitable piece of 3/4" plywood on the wall such that it spans to studs where it can be securely attached. The TV mount can then be mounted to the plywood using suitable screws that go into properly sized pilot holes. Note that face screwing into the plywood provides an excellent and strong mount ...


2

To cover a 15-second outage (power interruption) you need a UPS. A basic UPS should protect your TV from surges, brownouts and overvoltages by switching to battery power (with a very short interruption to power) but during an extended brownout/overvoltage it will eventually cut power to the TV. To cover extended brownouts or overvoltages, you need a line-...


2

Basement, attic, crawlspace, & closet (removable panel?). Attached garage? Possibly does not exist and is a direct run. Start by finding where the coaxial cable enters your house and try to trace it from there. If it enters directly behind the working jack, it's likely a direct run by the cable company who did not tie into your existing (questionable ...


2

No... those expanding bolts aren't going to do the job, period. There are several reasons but suffice it to say your TV will find up on the floor. Toggle bolts of some variety are the preferred way to do it... it's hard to believe that no one in a city the size of yours has them or something more suitable. What you need is something that will spread the ...


2

Rather than use WiFi, you can use a specific transmission system. These are known as videosenders or digisenders. I use a German made system for sending the signal from my Sky satellite box to the television in the bedroom. They are available in the 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands. For the HD that you require I suggest that you would need to use the 5GHz variant. ...


2

My standard practice is to use a low-voltage "box": ... and a blank cover plate: ... to which I add a desktop grommet: It's a bit fiddly, but hot glue works well to secure the grommet to the plate from behind and now you have a robust, high-capacity, good looking conduit for about any cable. There's a good chance someone makes something like this ready to ...


2

No, the RMS rating determines how much wattage (volume) a speaker can handle before blowing out. Generally, this just means a more powerful magnet and a cone with a center sleeve which is longer and a more durable cone. In fact, in some scenarios, the speaker cone could be constructed out of materials which are more durable, but have less desirable sound ...


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