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32

The OEM cable does not have a ground or earth connection. The cable on the right does. So this will be a safe replacement for the original cable. The ground connection will not be used and that wire in the cable is not connected to either of the other wires in that cable.


30

Absolutely no problem. The screws (actually called "lag bolts") bite into the wood immediately around them, and the wood fibers around that hold the bolt in place. Yes the holes you made already weaken the fibers immediately around them but the amount is insignificant. And, for a flat screen TV like you're describing, the weight you'll be putting on ...


20

There are wall plates that are designed for your situation. Power For power, you can add the socket as you described. Low voltage For HDMI/signal/etc low voltage stuff, there are a number of options. Running conduit is the best for future flexibility. I personally like just having a cable sticking out of the wall, rather than putting connectors ...


17

To answer the question of what these cables are called, they are IEC 60320 (commonly called kettle plugs) connectors. If you take a look at the "Appliance_couplers" section of the linked page you will see the left is c17/c18 (the male and female versions have different numbers) while the right is c13/14. It looks like from the table the plug on the ...


10

Now that I see your photo I'd do this differently. I'd install a vertical cleat just behind the faceframe on each side of the cabinet, maybe 1" back (the thickness of the plate plus 1/4"). I'd then span a sheet of 3/4" plywood across them, creating a solid face on which to install your mount. You should have either a cabinet wall or framing to screw into. ...


10

A bunch of ways to do this. What I would probably do myself, which is not what you are currently planning, is: Cut a piece of plywood, probably 3/4" thick, 24" tall by ~ 20" (studs 16" apart) or ~ 28" (studs 24" apart). Mount the plywood with 3 screws on each stud. Paint the plywood to match the wall. It doesn't have to be perfect because it will be mostly ...


10

It is a bad idea. TV screens are designed to be viewed basically level from your eyes as you sit in your TV room. If you mount it above the mantel you will forever looking up to see the thing. The heat thing is also a concern for electronics as you have mentioned. Raise the temperature some and in the best case you will age certain components and shorten ...


9

Electrically, you can go either way Attaching to the push connector or attaching to the backstabs or screws is 3 of one, half dozen of the other. I mean, backstabs (and push connectors) are known to be unreliable, so you take your chances of having an hours-long, frustrating bug hunt. Screws are more reliable, but you must torque them adequately. A ...


8

No, you can not mount the TV the way you have described. Since you want the TV to articulate out from the wall, most of the force will be pull-out instead of shear. The barn boards are not attached to the wall in such a way to support your TV. It's likely you would rip the barn boards right off the wall, or break one where you drill for the toggle bolts. ...


8

Is this safe to do? Yes. Does the third prong of the new cable interact in any way with the other two? The third pin is a protective earth connection, some appliances "class 1" require a protective earth connection to maintain single-fault safety. Others "class 2" do not. The connectors are sensibly designed so you can use a cord with ...


7

Of course it's illegal to run power cords inside walls. National Electrical Code 400.8 rolls through the things you can't do with cord, and it's mostly a list of schemes to use them as a substitute for the permanent wiring of a structure. Nope, just nope. Data cables, on the other hand, can go right into the wall cavity. Punch a hole in the drywall and ...


7

I agree with unhandledexcepsean--I would use lag bolts for larger TVs. Some flat screens will be fine with the wood screws through the drywall into the stud not using the plastic expanding anchor. I have seen some smaller mounts where 4 of the plastic anchors into drywall are supposed to work but I do not like those at all. Since you have at least 1 stud, ...


7

If you insist on opening the wall, which seems rather foolish to me considering the other options available, I wouldn't install a full-height stud. I'd keep the destruction to a minimum and enjoy a better outcome as a result Open a section of wall slightly taller than the TV mount bracket and to the center of each adjacent stud. Add cross-blocks between ...


6

According to this source, which unfortunately does not cite its own sources, the following considerations are needed when drilling into studs: Holes in bearing wall studs (exterior and interior walls that bear the weight of the roof and/or other stories above) may not exceed 40 percent of the width of the stud. Notches in bearing wall studs may not ...


6

Living and working as a cable television technician in a beachside region, I can attest to the value of the silicone dielectric grease for improving the lifespan of these connections. Salt air eats everything in time, yet the grease prevented corrosion after five years. The fittings were assembled with "boots," rubber covers which resemble spark plug wiring ...


5

Plan 2 (solid plywood) for the win. That kind of weight (with extra leverage) would be terrible in just drywall with a single stud. Speaking of leverage, if you can consider making the strip of ply a little taller (like, 2'), it should be a little more solid. (Admittedly, this might be overkill.) In addition to getting the plywood into at least 2 studs, you'...


5

You need to attach the mount to the concrete, not the drywall. There are special anchors for concrete. Most are made of metal and expand into the hole drilled in the concrete with a hammer drill and a masonry bit. Most masonry anchors are sleeve anchors and use bolts (also called machine screws) to expand the anchor. There are also metal lag shields that ...


5

Why you shouldn't use NM cable NM-B cable (Romex®) is not designed to be used as a flexible cord, and must be properly secured and supported. It's also not rated for use where it may be exposed to physical damage. Flexible cords have thicker jackets, which are designed to hold up to a bit more abuse. They also contain stranded wires, which hold up to ...


5

You need a long, flexible auger bit. I have this model and found it invaluable when I need to add a new cable inside the wall. The kit has a 90 degree handle that fits on the shaft and lets you bend it to fit through the wall opening to reach the bottom or top of the stud bay and drill through. This forum page gives a nice rundown and pictures of the bit in ...


5

It may not be desired, but sometimes it's the only available wall space in the room. FYI, we mounted our 55" above the fireplace. But the fireplace was converted to propane at the same time. I was able to attach it to some paneling that was used to build the fireplace surround, after appropriate reinforcing. Here's a picture of it completed. Note that ...


4

It sounds like you have solid 13/16" thick plywood for a wall. If that is the case, I'd drill holes matching holes in the mount all the way through, get four metal bolts, four matching nuts and eight washers, and hang the mount on the wall, securing with nuts from the opposite side of the wall and using threadlocker on bolt threads. You would have nuts ...


4

Use toggles, but also put at least one good fastener into the stud. (Even if you have to drill a new hole/holes in the mount.)


4

According to the manual, the AV output section has L and R audio outputs that you could connect to an audio amplifier. The "Video" connector will be composite video, the L and R audio outputs will be typical phono (AKA RCA) connectors at audio "line" levels. Twin phono to twin phono cable used for stereo audio (Red is Right channel) and triple phono to ...


4

Two possible issues come to mind: The larger screen will not physically fit in the tv wall mount The leverage of the larger screen can tear out the fixings (torque = force * distance).


4

Studs above a fireplace are often placed flat instead of on edge against the brick/chimney. This is done so the wall can be thinner in that area. So I think you are you are right in saying you think the wide face of the stud is against the back side of the drywall. I really encourage you to re-think the idea of placing a TV up high over a fire-place. This ...


4

With proper anchors 3 studs are fine. One #10 wood screw penetrated 1" into cedar (the least quality of commercial lumber) will resist pull out of about 90 lbs, into most typical framing studs (with a specific gravity greater than 0.45) will hold 150 lbs.


4

Feedback: sounds like a good idea. But I suggest you use as big fasteners as possible, as your moment on them will be quite high...the load being so far from the anchors themselves. Something at least 3/8" or even 1/2". The entire weight of the set is around 112lb and your TV will stand at least 6in from the brick surface; this will create a ...


3

Most every mount I've seen has several holes through which it can be secured to studs. This is to account for different stud spacing, as well as allow for several lateral positions so that the TV is not off center. Double check your mount instructions, to ensure it will not accommodate your stud spacing. I'm very suspicious that the mount says it must be ...


3

OTA DTV antenna cable is commonly RG6 (replaced RG59). This is a 75 ohm coaxial cable with an F or BNC termination (probably F). The better quality component video cables use 3 separate RG6 cables with RCA connectors at the end. They are simply attached together in a bundle. My original answer assumed this is what you had. With the picture you've added it ...


3

This is how it is meant to be mounted. The plastic cabinet does not support any weight. If you put a large washer, or cardboard over the plastic cabinet without using a spacer, then you run a chance of crushing the plastic of the cabinet when you tighten the bolts.


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