4

It's an antenna / satellite combiner. Appears to be an aftermarket add-on. It takes both LNB feeds from the dish, along with the antenna signal, and combines them onto one wire. In this case, it looks like it fed four boxes. Apparently this unit could combine them without a splitter on TV end. Either way, I wouldn't use it without a satellite dish. A ...


2

So it turns out that this wasn't a signal or hardware issue, it was an air-gap issue. I'd incorrectly labelled one of the cables and ended up thinking both ends of the same cable were different cables (that's what you get running cables behind walls). After discovering this and plugging the correct things into the right places, everything worked as expected ...


1

Freeview retunes can change the frequency, power and other technical characteristics of the digital signal. This can cause problems for some receivers and not others due to differences in software, sensitivity and the quality of the signal on that cable. Historically many TV aerials were designed to favour a narrow frequency band specific to each region. ...


1

You can poke a hole in the wall and push the cable through the hole , no box is required (this is how a cable company will do it), I usually use a low voltage ring like a wbf-1 this provides a way to mount a cover plate. Make sure to seal the entry cable and hole with a quality silicone sealer. Your needs for a TV cable box depends on what you have ...


1

Two many questions so I will tackle a few code issues. The water pipe is required to be bonded to your electrical system so go ahead and use it as a second electrode. In truth that water pipe is normally a much better electrode than a standard 8’ ground rod. I might drop a 2nd 8’ at 6’ or more away from your existing unknown rod. Many people here probably ...


1

If it's inside of the attic, it's not exposed to lightning or wind, which is why you ground them in the first place. You don't need a ground here. If your wire runs outside the house, however, it wouldn't be a bad idea to ground the wires.


1

Your tester probably uses direct current (DC) which will be blocked by the capacitor. The capacitor should pass the high frequency AC signal from the aerial. Mind you, those are horrible cheap unscreened sockets. You'd be much better using the screened type with the metal cage which were shown in the rest of the video.


1

Proceed as if that didn't exist. There's no markings on it and it's the largest passive splitter I've ever seen. IDK, maybe it's awesome. More likely though it doesn't have a good HZ range. "only hook up what you have to, to avoid signal loss." - that means what you actually want is a M-M connector, not even a splitter at all.


1

Okay, I was having this issue and found the problem if your using a Leaf style antenna. I tried lots of things but sometimes you just gotta Keep it simple. I wrapped tin foil around the antenna part facing in. That's it. Every single problem disappeared. Instantly. Might even be boosting things a bit. Just posting this in here since it was the first ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible