Hot answers tagged

23

Neither. It's labeling paint. It was either sprayed onto the entire lumber unit or this truss set for identification. source


15

No contractor needed. Cut a piece of 1/2" plywood 3-1/2" X 12", drill 10 screw holes in it, slather it with glue and screw it on there. Might be overkill, but should do the job.


14

If you need to fix this so you can sleep better at night, any carpenter would be able to sister this truss for a repair. In my humble opinion though, no repair is needed. If you look around up there, there' a good chance you'll see notches cut all the way through for cables, conduit, pipes, etc.


8

I would verify your trusses have the capacity to add the additional weight of the strong ties and 2x4s on 16”. That is how I have done it on several buildings but I had the weight added in because I wanted clear span below. Your trusses look a bit lighter than mine were, but I can’t see much of them. But our span was similar.


7

Assuming you go with the idea of hanging 2x4 ceiling joists, you might consider using a top-mount hanger. This would take advantage of the fact that the truss members are also a standard 2x size to save time; top-mount hangers would "automatically" be square and located in the correct vertical position. Example: Simpson HU26TF for 2x6s. (You could ...


5

You'll need the 2x4s (oriented vertically, of course, as implied by the joist hangers you linked to) to span that distance and carry drywall.


5

TL;DR You will probably compress your roof and make things structurally worse using "permanent" ratchet straps. With the ratchet straps you are only hiding a symptom which can be seen from inside your home. It would make things structurally worse in the long run. Look at your roof line from the outside, is the ridge starting to do something like ...


4

Roof trusses tend to be highly engineered and not designed to be altered, and I don't consider myself knowledgeable enough to know exactly how dangerous this is. My suspicion is that you've reduced the possible load your roof can support which would be an issue in strong windows for heavy snow. The typical solution is to sister another board onto this one. ...


4

Trusses are designed based on 1) top and bottom chord size, 2) size of web members, 3) size of connectors at each chord, 4) species of wood, 5) pitch of roof. I'd go to your local truss manufacturer and give him all the info I listed above and have him run it through his "truss calculator". It'll take him about 5 seconds and you'll know for sure. (Or, go to ...


4

I’d be surprised if it isn’t a 3 point bearing truss and the center wall isn’t a bearing wall, because: 1) wall was designed as 3’ high but built full height, 2) wall was not shown as “bearing wall” but wall shown as 3’ high, 3) truss bearing on “Jack trusses” on left side of drawing, 4) vaulted truss does not have thrust brace connected to left side truss. ...


4

It is unlikely that a residential truss has a load bearing center point unless it was carrying another truss load and being used as a girder. That doesn't appear to be the case. It appears that the truss was too low once it spanned the high ceiling area and the clearance was elevated to create a vaulted ceiling at the top of the stairwell. That truss appears ...


4

The only answer for removal of those angle 2x4s is no, it is not possible at all unless a major reinforcement of the ceiling and roof is done. The members that make up the roof are set so they work together as a whole, and to remove one part will severely weaken the whole truss that the piece was removed from. Remove one piece from more than one truss, you ...


4

Timber frame trusses (and steel frame trusses, for that matter) are frequently spaced wider. Truss strength comes from the truss design, and the depth of the truss, not so much the depth of the lumber from which the truss is made. My 24 foot span trusses are completely 2x4 material. Wider spacing means whatever you put between the trusses has to span the ...


3

I finally got a licensed engineer out to take a look at this. The working theory is that the truss was damaged when the home was built, some 30+ years and 2+ owners ago. The rest of the truss system looks like it's in good shape. Sounds like I'm either the first person to notice this or the first person to care. The solution they drew up was to put a 30"...


3

Absolutely not. You CANNOT cut a truss in this way. They are not engineered with a huge amount of wiggle room. You risk having your roof collapse. The saner solution would be to lower the platform that the unit sits on to create some more room.


3

Truss systems like that have "strongbacks" at intervals--vertically oriented 2x6 lumber that ties the trusses together and shares load among them. For anything under about 500 lbs. I have no concerns except one: If you suspend a heavy object at a point along the bottom chord that falls in the center of the gap between web connections, the bottom chord could ...


3

For small buildings like this I'm not a load calculations guy. I'm a seat-of-the-pants experience guy. This is because lumber is usually grossly oversized for such short spans anyway, so it comes down to your carpentry techniques. Yes, that design is plenty stout from a lumber standpoint (even 2x4 rafters are plenty), but you must fasten the joints together ...


2

The split top cord should be repaired. Lay a 6 or 8 ft long 2x4 or 2x6 across 3 or 4 of the bottom cords, then use a length of 2x4 to push up to close the split. When it is aligned properly, nail it in place with numerous nails that are the type that do not causing splitting. Then sister on 3 or 4 ft (or more) of 2x4 on one side of the repaired section. If ...


2

Trusses are made to float over interior walls. There are special metal clips made to allow that function and still keep an interior wall stable. Here is one by Strong-Tie(r) When the truss is under load as in snow load the bottom cord flexes and in some cases you will see nail pops at interior walls where the drywall was not nailed they way it is needed for ...


2

Yes you can fix your roof, but there are many issues you’ll need to address. First, you’ll need to understand that trying to “fix” this monster is difficult because the species, grade, size of nails, etc. are not known. Obviously the builder didn’t know or understand basic construction because, 1) minimal garage door header, 2) no window header, 3) truss ...


2

The type of roof truss design that you show is far from optimal. You should be thinking of something that looks a lot more like the picture below. https://www.selecttrusses.com/truss-calculator/ This design provides a lot better support for the rafters and for the lower chord. You can get the rafters ready made where the metal finger plates are pressed ...


2

This is definitely a 3-bearing truss and it requires the support point in the middle. The reason I can see that is because a two point truss is going to have a lot of tension in the lower chord. The lower chord needs to be a continuous tie from one outer bearing point to the other outer bearing point to hold the walls from pushing outward. At the ...


2

For your new shed I would have built 2x6 stud walls @ 16''oc and the same for the roof joists. In Ontario, you will need 6'' walls to get a minimum of insulation. You can always fur out to get more depth for insulation if you have already built the walls but that won't change the strength of your walls. I'm not sure what the snow and wind loads are in your ...


2

Does the sheathing connect to the top plate securely? If not, because of the shims, you will need to run screws from below through the lower top plate. You could use long hurricane clips instead. Photo courtesy HD Supply I have seen long screws run through both plates from below, just like you have from the top, just run them in.


2

Yes. They will not impart enough force to harm the truss webs. Cables, duct work, plumbing, and other things are routinely attached to truss webs.


1

This type of roof construction is what I call “stick built” That is to say individual boards are nailed together in the field in place. Another similar type is “beam and joist”. The main difference between the two systems is the beam and joist can resist the spreading of the exterior walls when put in a vaulted design. Where as the stick built will “push” ...


1

No, you can’t change the framing from beams at 4’ on center to trusses 4’ on center, because you’ll overload the exterior wall footings. Currently, one-half the roof load is supported by the center beam and footings with one- fourth the roof load transferred to the exterior walls and footings. By changing to trusses, you’ll transfer one-half the roof load to ...


1

This is the solution I went with, one of two suggest by the inspector: The double top plate acts as a diaphragm to distribute load, so it needs to be solid. I used strips of plywood of increasing thickness to shim up and fill the gap. As Jack suggested, I also screwed up into the trusses from the bottom, and used hurricane ties on the truss I couldn't get ...


1

You need to define the type of garage ceiling you're looking to use. Not all trusses can be used for downward forces (say it keeps the walls from spreading) and if you're accidentally mis-describing them you could be getting some bad advice. That said, assuming your climbing wall touches the ground the load will be carried there. Lateral forces on the side ...


1

The wall is not structural and the top plate tie-in is not structural if, 1) the trusses are tied to the remaining wall, 2) the top plate is spliced properly. 1) Any lateral bracing that the wall could provide, can be taken by attaching the existing roof trusses to the top plate. I like using Simpson H-1 clips to tie the truss to the top plate. I like the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible