31

What not to do We get people who find 4-12 non-ground wires they don't understand, and so they take them all apart. I call this "trying to learn electrical by disassembling your house". Every wire is now separated and splayed all over the box, and they ask "how does this hook up?" And we tell them Wire it exactly the way you found it And you can (...


13

Never do random things in electrical. You will stumble upon combinations that will work but will kill you. Pause to learn what exactly it is you are doing. Only then proceed. OK, so you had a GFCI that was previously installed and worked before, and now suddenly is tripping. The most important point is that GFCI devices are capable of protecting ...


7

It sounds like you have a pretty good handle of the problem. Hidden junction boxes do exist but it could also be a failure along the cable. If you've 100% ruled out all known junction boxes then you need to narrow down the problematic section of cable and go hunting between with a cable tracer. With each section of wiring (ie: junction box to next junction ...


7

What's done is done. I'd grout and generally move on with life, and only revisit it if and when the tiles start popping on their own, which may never happen. You are NOT a professional tile installer who would be well advised to rip out and do it over for the sake of their reputation. So you don't need to act like one.


7

Do you have a double switch on the wall? The red and black wires in a three core at a light fitting are usually intended to be separate feeds for a fan plus lighting fixture. If you look behind the switch you may find the red and black commoned together there too, if a double switch wasn't fitted. Usually the unused one is just capped off at the light ...


5

The answer is not a cut and dry one in your case. The troubleshooting is a process. You will need an understanding of a multiple light parallel circuit. You will also need a proximity type voltage tester and possibly a VOM. Assuming the voltage feed starts at the switch (not always the case, but normal) you will need to verify input voltage at the line ...


5

Check both the top and bottom outlets when checking GFI receptacles. One might be serving as a junction box. I have a 1970s home and one GFI feeds two other outlets, one inside in the master bath and one outside. When a worker started his electric saw outdoors, it blew the circuit and it tested with an open neutral. I had tested all of the inside bathroom ...


4

Many lawnmowers use a plastic vane under the engine shroud that interacts with air moving off fins on the flywheel to work as a speed control mechanism to open and close the carburetor throttle valve in response to the engine speed changing because of loading changes. Lawnmowers often operate in very dusty environments and the linkages associated with the ...


4

If you're saying that the breaker pops when the switch it turned to the 'on' position and nothing is in the socket, it is possible if you had the 'hot' on one connection and 'neutral' on the second connection of a single pole switch, that every time you turn the switch on, you're effectively touching hot to neutral, causing the breaker to trip. If this is a ...


4

There are a few possibilities, you can eliminate them one by one: Take proper safety precautions to ensure that you are not injured if the door operates while you perform the following tests The wiring is loose at the opener. Depending on your opener, you may have screw terminals or push in connectors. Check that the wires are secure by gently tugging on ...


3

Check the thermostat O (orange) terminal with a multimeter to ground. Most brands energize (apply 24V AC on the terminal) in cooling mode. A bunch of things could be going on such as a wire loose, bad thermostat, bad control board in heat pump or bad reversing valve but the first thing to check is the thermostat then you can work your way back to the ...


3

Your heat pump switches between heating and cooling mode through a reversing valve. It sounds like that is where your problem is; it could be that your thermostat has gone bad, or it could be something else. The outside condensing unit is blowing 68 degrees because the system is pulling heat out of the outside air, and pumping it into the house.


3

Where several white/neutral wires are tied together in a wire nut in the back of a J-box, take a moment to pull on each wire to make sure that one did not come loose from the connection. This does happen more often than you'd like. A white/neutral wire can just be laying in the wire nut, and not actually be tight with the others.


3

Are you sure the circuit was live when you measured it? If you try to measure an open (i.e. off) circuit, you can sometimes read a "phantom voltage" caused by coupling with other nearby live wires. Phantom voltages can't generate a significant amount of current and are therefore harmless, but they can be measured by a multimeter. If you say the fixture ...


3

As others have mentioned, you need to test continuity of every neutral line from the box to the end of the circuit, and then once you have ruled a bad line out, then you should start checking the outlets if they are all carrying the load of the one ahead of it. To test continuity of the lines you do not need power, just a voltimeter tool so you can shut off ...


3

Almost certainly the ballast, unless old enough to actually have a separate starter, at which point it becomes a tossup between ballast and starter - probably not from 1992. But a 1992 ballast is certainly ripe for replacement 22 years later. They don't live forever. I have a few older ones I have not gotten around to replacing that are very humidity-...


3

Make sure that the spacer behind the blade is intact. If it is not then tightening the blade will cause it to bind/rub on the housing of the saw. Also my saw has spacers on both sides of the blade. You could "google" your saw to see what parts may be missing.


3

If you can verify that there is power to the condensing unit (outside unit) then you have done all most homeowners can do. The fan on your furnace (the thing in the basement) will come on any time the A/C is turned on. The outside unit has many safety and will not come on if any of those are not on. For instance, if your system has lost refrigerant over the ...


3

Open the furnace so you see the control panel. Manually depress the kill-switch that powers down the system when the panel you took off is absent. Meter across the secondary terminals of the transformer. 24V? You're problem isn't the transformer. No voltage? Meter across the primary terminals. Got voltage? You need another transformer.


3

It's very unlikely the wiring in the walls was damaged. Usually what happens is a weak connection gets fried by the short circuit. As many others have mentioned previously here, these failures are often the result of the infamous "back stab" outlets. You might have to take out several of them (WITH THE POWER OFF) and inspect for loose connections or ...


3

Have you pushed the "reset" button? Many GFCIs need that done when first wired up. And really, get a short 10-32 screw (you can buy green ones for the purpose, or green ones with a loop of wire already attached for the purpose, but you don't need to) and look for a pre-threaded hole in the box which is intended for the ground wire - the way the ...


2

Verify that the door is leaking and not some other place. Have a helper with you and on a dry week spray with a water hose against the door where it meets the jam see if any water leaks in from that. Give it 30 min to show up and if that doesn't work try spraying around the outside of the frame and see if it leaks in then. Follow the stains to the wall. It ...


2

If your outlets are wired so that the "load" goes through the outlet, then you might have a continuity problem with an outlet receptacle. You need to check the continuity of all the outlets on the circuit if they aren't wired with pigtails and instead have the line connected to one set of screws and the load connected to the other set.


2

It turns out there was a thermometer inside the cans that shuts off power if the light overheats. The thermometer was physically damaged when I was messing around up there. We replaced the affected can and the blown-out switch, and everything is good.


2

You need to check out a few additional things. From the information you've provided, your panel and breakers could be fine, but the wiring between panel and fixtures could be damaged. You can use a non-contact electrical tester to check the wiring at a few points. Start with the cables exiting your panel, and see if you can follow along to the fixtures that ...


2

Start troubleshooting with any recent fixture, switch, or outlet work on that circuit. Then trace the problem circuit from the main box outward removing every junction faceplate and inspecting. Jiggle and twist connections while looking for issues. It may be resolved just by a few turns here and there.


2

The problem may possibly lie in the ballast, the tube(s), or the switch. The simplest initial test is to replace the tube(s) with (a) new one(s) and see if the problem goes away. If so, the problem was in the tube(s). Testing the ballast and the switch is a little more complicated, but made simpler by ensuring that the fixture is equipped with (a) known-...


2

If you search the web for "repair manual" plus the model of your drier, you may be able to find a copy of that, or a site which will sell you a PDF if it for a few bucks. That will give instructions on how to disassemble and reassemble the drier. To access the timer, that's usually a matter of pulling the knobs off and loosening some screws on the back so ...


2

Spent hours on internet. Hours and hours. Looked at all the manuals, etc. The washer has two clips, easy to get to. But the dryer? How? Where? First, on the back, remove two small screws at the top of the console. Then see the pic. Just shove a paint scraper in about an inch or so -- it will compress the clip, which will allow you to lift up the ...


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