7

First off it is not the best idea to assume that the walls and ceiling angles are all at 90 degrees. These should be measured so that you can make minor adjustments in the cuts if necessary. The primary reason that the cut did fit is because the first piece of crown molding was not installed correctly. It was pushed too far flat toward the side wall in the ...


5

In addition to comment above, which is entirely possible that walls are not square, with dimensional trim like this you need a compound mitre. It's not just cutting flat at a 45 degrees, you also need a tilt, called bevel angle, that corresponds to the dimensional depth of the trim. Crown is one of the more challenging to get the right "tilt" on. Here is ...


4

The molding on the right appears to be pushed in at the top. This seems to be confirmed by the fact that the mitre on the left is gapping at the ceiling (indicating that the bottom of the right side is too low because the molding is pushed in at the top).


4

I would agree with Isherwood and they can be tough. looking at the 2 pieces the angle of the blade is slightly off causing the difference in size. The gauges on most home owner type table saws is a ball park, use a triangle square to set your blade angle not a small one one close to the size of your blade. Carbide tips use a spacer at the bottom and you can ...


4

Some ideas, in order of preference: Drop the wiring down from each box, under the floor (which would allow you to remove the shelf board) Bring the wiring up under the shelf board where it's mostly hidden. Overlay a one-by board with a minimal gap behind (maybe right behind the blocks on which the faceplates are mounted) Run Wiremold™ or similar in ...


3

I would have either removed the door trims, trim as necessary then refitted after, cut the door trims in-situ so that the new floor would slide under. Have used both methods in the past - often depends on how hard it would be to remove the old door trim (sometimes they are so old they split), but cutting in-situ can be difficult - have used just a blade ...


3

Cedar is what I have used because it is very good at rot resistance, fascia boards especially with gutters attached are one of the places in a home I usually find rot if your budget allows redwood is even better but cost more.


3

My best suggestion from personal experience and opinion, is to stay away from adhesives. Mechanical fasteners (nearly) always have a method of removal that doesn't destroy the things it's fastening. You can pull a common nail, back out a screw, or punch through a finish screw. In my house I've had similar things happen, and it's usually due to the wood ...


3

This is not about the trim, but… Danger! Danger! The top flange of the window has no flashing over it to direct water running down the wall onto the exterior of the flange rather than the interior. As a result, any water that runs down the wall will go right into the inside of the house. For that matter, the whole window looks un-flashed. That exposed wood ...


3

If the fence of the saw is acurate, and the angle of cut is good, the trick I use to joint angled pieces together as you need there is to make a masking tape hinge. First I use 2" blue tape and apply it lengthwise the filler along the cut miter, letting half the tape lay off the filler to receive the other filler. Before setting the other filler in place, ...


3

When you enter a room, the first wall you see is the wall you start on. Upon starting, I cut a block of scrap wood that mimics the rise and run of the crown. The dotted line shows the square back that has been cut off help set the block in the corner, since the drywall corners are not square. Go around the room with a stud finder if you have one and ...


2

If you're going for maximum lifetime, you should make sure to prime all cuts with an oil based primer. If the lumber didn't come pre-primed, then prime all surfaces with an oil based primer. If you use a fast drying primer, you can get a coat of paint over the cut before you install it. I wouldn't worry about using a "sealant" between the boards. I'm ...


2

Nail it. You will forever regret a decision to glue the casing if it ever comes to a need to do repairs or modifications.


2

The boards shouldn't be attached to anything but themselves (glued & jointed together) & must literally float between the battens & rails. The battens, bottom & top rail should all be rabbeted to allow for full invisible movement of the boards, behind the battens & rails rabbets.


2

Not every corner is perfect, and some adjustment is needed for every cut in some cases. Either the cut is not square, and the saw is still not adjusted, or the wall is bumped out at the bottom. If that is the case the wall can be carved back behind the base or the base can be thinned down on the back to get the corner to come together.


2

Miters like that are extremely challenging without automated equipment, which is why they're rarely done. I've attempted them with cedar siding corners and a few other projects and have mostly given up on that whole strategy. Normally you'd either: Use a simple lap joint with the seam oriented to the less conspicuous direction Use a rabbeted lap joint (to ...


2

I think I'd run the tile all the way out over the door frame. You definitely don't want to do mdf trim there. Go with natural wood, or one of the synthetic materials.


2

I would case the windows too. No need to tear out the sheetrock if it's sound - nail right up over it to the framing wood behind it at the corners. What you use to do this and how exactly is up to you, the functions of the windows, and the wainscoting. The wainscoting is going to add visual bulk and interest to the surface of the otherwise blank wall, and ...


2

I happen to have a shop built with Marvin Integrity windows. As far as I know, the customary/expected way to provide an interior sill/trim is that it either butts up to or slips behind the wood frame provided with the window. Yes, there's a visible seam - it's not a big deal. Your photographically-challegened-ness makes it difficult to determine if you ...


2

All the other answers that are currently here are good and correct, but I just wanted to share a "cheat" for making a mitered corner look a little neater sometimes. Not sure how useful it will be for the materials you're using, but it might be useful for someone else in a similar problem. YMMV but it has saved my butt a couple of times. Once you assemble ...


2

If the look you want is modern trimless, be careful on how you remove the jamb extensions. It looks like the window jamb may go over the wood jamb extensions. You will not need to add drywall to the returns. Add plywood instead, this way you can add 3/4" 1/2" or 1/4" where needed and add shims if things are at an angle. Then add your corner ...


1

As J. Raefield has explained, the modern way to make that moulding is with a spindle moulder. Unfortunately it's going to be much cheaper to buy the moulding ready-made than it is to buy a spindle-moulder. They are professional machines that often need a 20A three-phase power supply. The traditional hand-tool for creating these is a moulding plane, ...


1

The device you are showing is a router bit, for making ONE shape on the edge of a piece of wood. The moulding you want is made with a completely different tool called a "spindle moulder" that would have multiple knives in that shape to make that in one pass.


1

I have seen the tile and trim done a few different ways. There are two ways I prefer, but only one of the two ways would work in your situation. That is to stop the tile on top of the tub and not bring it down the side of the tub. This would give you the full 3" for the trim. If your trim will be the standard 2 1/4" that is used a lot these days, this ...


1

Pick out your trim for the window and for the frieze. Decide on head flashing. Decide on the jamb reveal. Make your best guess for the window position. Then frame the rough opening 3" extra wide and 3" extra tall. Then fill the RO down to size by screwing (not nailing) 1x stock to the jacks, header, and sill. Center your sheathing over the RO so that a ...


1

The drywall corner bead (the angled metal corner reinforcing strip that covers the whole outside corner) changes your angle at the corner, even if the walls are square (which they likely are not). You need to miter both molding pieces to a bit more than 45°, like a 1/2° on both to start, judging from your photo.


1

Based on your description it sounds like it's the door stop molding. It's a thin piece of trim that goes around the sides and top inside of the door frame that the door presses against when closed so it doesn't swing all the way through. Common size is about 1-1/4" wide by 3/8 to 1/2" thick. It's common for these to come loose over time especially if it's ...


1

If the piece has been attached to the wall with fasteners try tapping it back in place and adding 1 or 2 6 penny finish nails. If that isn't possible than try using wood glue by applying glue to each of the damaged pieces. Bring the pieces together and if possible clamp the piece in place while the glue is drying and/or fasten to wall with finish nails. Wipe ...


1

Short answer: Put some splines in those corners! Based on the details of your situation, that is probably enough. Long answer: Wood movement can be a problem for frame miters because the boards will get wider and narrower with humidity changes. This means the 45 degree miters will try to stretch themselves to be slightly different angles. Here's what I would ...


1

The "mysteriously gigantic" nailers are probably 15 gauge trim nailers similar to this one: Sounds like the one that you have is a finish nailer, and is likely a smaller gauge and uses nails with smaller heads. Thus less driving power required and a smaller gun. A trim nailer will generally give you better holding power, but also higher ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible