We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
7

It looks like all that is seperating the drywall from the tile is a bead of caulking. To fix this, I would first remove all of the existing caulking. Then I would cut out the area of the affected drywall and patch in a new piece, using the factory taped edge as the end that butts up against the tile. Tape, mud and sand the new section and paint to match. ...


7

Yeah, that 4" would be a long cut. It could be done in two passes, one from each side. The middle area would have a bit of an overlap and maybe a blade mark, but that could be sanded down. Plus you are probably going to finish it anyways. What I would recommend though is changing the shape of your transition piece to make it easier to cut, and would also ...


5

I had the exact same issue after I took a wall out: tile to hardwood. I cut one side with a rip saw and the other side with a wet tile hand-held saw (to keep the dust down). I used an 8 inch wide piece of oak. I stained it to match the floor and then used it as a guide to cut the other side so that it would drop in perfectly. The picture below is after I ...


5

I think you should be more concerned with the expansion gap than other types of expansion. In my opinion you should use some kind of separation between the living room and the bedrooms, because bigger rooms require bigger expansion gaps. And that difference in expansion could give some bowing.


5

Your run-of-the-mill reducer should do the job. This type usually comes with a steel channel that you'd anchor to the concrete, then you simply tap the piece in place.


4

Since each room in your house will have different temp and humidity levels, the T moulding allows each room to contract, expand, and flex independently of the others. This helps prevent warping and cracking.


4

One potential location is on the last rise on the stairs. This is depicted below on my crude diagram. Make the cut of the carpet right under the lip of the top of the 2nd floor. Use a piece of trim to hide the cut and make it finished. Other options include: Create a small carpet landing at the top. Take the carpet off all the stairs and make the stairs ...


4

I was only going to post a comment, since both members covered tile transitions, but I seen that the laminate floor transition has not been addressed. I will also throw my 2 cents on the tile transition too. The transition to the tile to wood has been well answered by both members above. Ecnerwal eluded to what I will mention. The joint between the tile ...


4

Solid hardwood is a tough one because unlike the other materials, it expands and shrinks. Laminate and especially engineered hardwoods with a plywood core are much more stable, but they will still expand and shrink a little bit. Certainly more than tile! I'm in the middle of installing plywood core engineered hardwood in my own house and I have tile ...


4

I would imagine it's a matter of preference, but IMO the transition is part of the floor and the baseboard is part of the wall. Given that the transition will blend in with the floor, I'd be inclined to put the baseboards on first and then cut the transition to fit. It's also generally simpler to cut something to length than it is to notch something ...


3

I know this is an old question, but here's what I did: (1) drill holes in the concrete. Yes, this is a PITA, but with the right bit it is not too bad. The holes do not need to be huge, nor do they need to be deep if you use the right screws. (2) Use the right screws. The ones I used are from a standard Big Box store, and are specifically designed for ...


3

In a normal room-sized install, both tools are used. The kicker for the first edge and the stretcher for the rest. Kickers are also used in corners where the stretcher is awkward to use. On stairs, just a kicker is used. A kicker is ideally only used to attach the carpet to the tack strip. A stretcher is used to attach the unanchored sides. You anchor ...


3

A usual method is to go down the edge of the wall with a surface bullnose, showing a "knife edge" at the corner. This means the tile rolls down to meet the corner. Another method, if your bullnose has finished bottoms, is to overlap the edge and go "around the corner", having the bullnose round into the outside wall (the wall that has the striped wallpaper)...


3

If this was an interior door I would say just live with it but since it is an exterior door I think you need to have it reinstalled. Issues: The biggest is that the threshold should be at most a minimal bump to your house. This is just odd and a tripping hazard. There is really no way to fix this. You in theory could cut off the head of the threshold ...


3

The metal edge you see is a Schluter trim that installs under the tile. The expansion rate changes radically based on the climate you're in--drier climates tend to shrink more. Regardless of where you live you should have done moisture tests on the wood, the subfloor and the air in the home. Relative humidity is ideal between 30/ 55% in most cases and for ...


2

There are several effective ways to hold the molding in place if you were OK with screwing it in place. One good way I would try would be to follow these steps: Cut and fit the molding into length and shape for the spot it would get installed. Check out the fit and see how well it fits down to the flooring on each side. Note any places where it takes a ...


2

For the sake of completeness, here's the alternative way of accomplishing this: Schluter RENO-TK I'd prefer this one (exactly the offset I have), but unfortunately could not find it anywhere locally, and tile installation was already scheduled.


2

You should not be regrouting between changes in surfaces unless it appears that your grout has damage or significant age. A lot of people will say that this change of surface should never be grouted because it will almost always crack like yours do to wall or house movement. I disagree and I usually grout these areas... but I know there will be a crack ...


2

The surfaces that the tile are mounted to can shift with respect to one another over time and through the seasons. This can be caused by temperature changes and by general "settling in" of the house itself. The nicest way to reseal the cracked grout is to scratch out some or all of the grout in the cracked areas and reapply new grout. Having said that this ...


2

It looks like a sanded caulk. The big box stores have these in their tile areas. I would find something that matches your backsplash grout.


2

If you choose to use plywood, go with the 3/4" T&G for the layer under the carpet. The trough were the heat pipes used to be can be spanned by the 3/4" plywood too. Also since the carpet compresses under foot, keep the plywood below the hardwood layer about 3/8" or so lower. That way when you step there, the transition will feel level.


2

In some homes, I have seen marble transitions used, even on elevation changes between flooring types. It embraces the functionality of the transition piece, instead of trying to hide it.


2

I have done transitions that just consist of an extremely clean edge, with surface heights matched. In my case I was butting tile to solid-wood parquet, so the actual wood movement is very limited. Likewise, most solid hardwod floors will (unless laid very tightly, very dry) simply open and close gaps between boards (one reason narrow boards are more common -...


2

I created mockups of a few different configurations and decided that I liked the look of the following the best. I created a 45°(an opposite cut of my original example cut; sorry I don't know the correct terminology), and created a "return" that was at the opposite 45° and cut 90° to butt up against the wall. I liked this option because it left no grain ...


2

Find a custom wood molding shop in your area (there will be one) and have them custom bevel a piece of 1 1/4" oak in a width that suits your fancy, then stain and varnish it. It will be more easily accomplished than you think, and the custom milling charge you will pay will be worth every penny. I might just butt a narrow piece of 1 1/4" oak right up to the ...


2

I’d try keeping them flush, you’ll have expansion allowance on both floors anyway. Just think of it as one floor with expansion gap around the perimeter. Which it will be effectively


2

Option 1: Replace with another marble transition Marble transitions are still sold. Replacing a broken one with another would preserve the original look of your floor. However, marble isn't the most durable material to make a transition out of, and it may look out of place if it's the only marble thing in the area. They're also kind of clunky because of ...


2

As noted above you should be able to find a wooden transition piece that would be large enough. The box stores may not carry such a large piece in stock but I'd be surprised if you couldn't find one online somewhere. Another option is to make a wooden transition piece yourself by taking something a 1x4 board and beveling the edges using a table saw, then ...


1

After rethinking your situation, I would cut a piece of flooring to make the transition piece like below. I wouldn't expect the slope at the bottom of tile side of the transition to be that noticeable because of the two lines above it being parallel to the tile.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible