New answers tagged

2

There is already an excellent answer about the new transformer, but a little explanation about the old transformer may help clarify things a bit: the old transformer has two red wires and no green/ground wire In the olden days, grounds were not required. But even when they were, one option was, and still is for some situations, to have the metal case (or ...


3

You should follow the instructions provided with the transformer here. Most I've seen have the threaded portion that goes through the knockout made of plastic, and therefore require the ground wire to be used for bonding. There may be some transformers that can be grounded via the knockout to the metal box directly. The instructions should tell you for sure. ...


6

The voltage conversion (if nessessary) is done inside the lamp housing that you pictured. This type of retrofit lamp is designed to fit into existing recessed cans that are designed to take a reflector bulb with a standard base. If you disconnect the orange connector and screw the base adapter into a bulb socket, a voltage meter will show 120v AC at the ...


19

I know you're looking for a "tweet" of an answer, a simplistic reason "Oh, it's this". There's actually a lot to it. It's not an ideology, it's hard empirical data culled from a sea of accident reports. They are using field data to "min-max" for minimum casualties. What you're talking about is an isolated system. That is a ...


2

Neutral is grounded in power distribution systems because power lines are on the top of poles and are enticing places for lightning strikes. It is not grounded to enhance electrocution safety for people who want to install electrical outlets in their shower stalls to power their radios while they take a shower...LOL By grounding neutral they can install ...


2

Generally, you are controlled by where the existing wiring is located. Mounting a new transformer has to follow Code and its labeling and instructions, particularly where the AC mains side of the transformer is concerned. The 24V low-voltage wiring can follow the relaxed rules for low-voltage power, and be installed like thermostat wire. Here are 2 popular ...


0

They just want you to use it in a place where the outlet is under the eves, and your winter is snow. So that it's not hosed down with water. The "indoor" is to keep dummies from returning the string when they put it outside in a temperate climate during the winter and it gets rained on.


1

Actually this warning can be for wire wound transformers and switching power supplies that do not have a protective shell where water and or moisture can damage the device. Adding a water / moisture tight enclosure with approved sealing grommets or bushings would be a code legal way to do this. In most cases a NEMA 3R case will be sufficient. In all cases A ...


0

The light string is suitable for outdoor use. The transformer/power supply is not suitable for outdoor use, and must be placed inside.


Top 50 recent answers are included