11

Don't worry about it Breakers have a certain latitude to them, and can run slightly above rating for a short time. That provides for motor starting and short term overloads. You're not supposed to plan to overload anyway You should be provisioning power for 125% of what you expect to actually draw. So if you plan for 6800 VA of actual load, you should ...


5

GFCI is no-go with some transfer switches There are some very terrible, very expensive transfer switches which have a row of switches, 6, 8 or 10 of them, and individual fuses or mini-breakers near each one. Those allow you to switch individual circuits from utility to gen (a "cute" feature but not worth paying $400 for, considering how junky the ...


4

That's to be expected. The neutral from the circuit is going through the GFCI breaker, but the hot is coming from the generator. The GFCI sees this as an imbalance, since there's no current flowing through the hot side of the breaker. Here's what your setup likely looks like (if it was drawn really quickly in MSPaint). If you follow the current through ...


4

Connecting 2 different generators that can not be synced will cause disaster to the wiring and the smaller or cheaper generator if any 240v loads are connected. Using a common neutral you are taking a risk even with only 120v loads. With separate transfers and loads as separately derived systems could be legal but I don't think so with a common neutral.


4

There can only be one point in the system where neutral and ground wires are joined, and this is usually in the main panel. Therefore, you must lift the bond from the generator, or disconnect the ground wire from the generator to the transfer switch. If you lift the bond on the generator, you can run both ground and an insulated neutral back to the ...


4

This is permanent wiring, so you need to use cable (or individual wires in conduit), not cordage The wiring from an inlet box to a transfer switch is permanent building wiring, so cordage such as the SOOW you propose is completely the wrong stuff for the job. Instead, I'd use 6/3 UF cable (good for 55A) if I wanted to future-proof this (the biggest inlet ...


3

Yeah, that's how you do that. A 200A main panel which contains a 100A feeder breaker to A xxxA subpanel via a 100A transfer switch. The 100A feeder breaker protects the transfer switch. Assuming the subpanel is quite large (30-space +), it will surely be rated well over 100A. It will be able to operate safely downline from a 100A breaker. If the subpanel ...


3

No, you can't do that A 100A manual transfer panel has a 100A breaker for the utility-side input; as a result, it would be a "bottleneck" if you put it inline with your service, restricting the whole service to 100A. However, this does not mean that you have the wrong transfer switch, so do not go running back to the store before you read the rest of this ...


3

For a generator of that size, the primary connection would not be through those convenience outlets, but rather directly to lugs sized for the cables required. If this wasn't the primary use of the generator, and you wanted an easily detachable connection, and 50 amps was sufficient, then you could use the 4-conductor receptacle with a cable. Your model ...


3

You have two choices. 1) Remove the jumper on the generator, and connect it to the transfer switch as you had planned. But have to put the jumper back on if you ever want to use the generator separately. You also have to hard wire the neutral through the transfer switch. or 2) You can leave the jumper on the generator, drive a separate ground rod for the ...


3

Many generators (especially those for permanent installation) have optional automatic transfer switch assemblies. If the backup generator is permanently installed, then I'd recommend buying its recommended transfer switch. Wire it per its instructions. If you're going to build your own transfer switch, then make sure that it is "break before make" or has ...


3

It sounds like the winds knocked one leg of your service down in a way that kept your inverter from powering up the dead leg -- most inverters are line-interactive, and won't feed into a dead or partially dead system to avoid desynchronization problems (i.e. feeding AC of the wrong frequency to some devices may make them work improperly due to internal ...


3

Yes, this appears to be doable, but the parts required aren't quite standard The good news is that this actually appears to be possible using inexpensive, readily obtainable parts; the only bad news is that it requires using them in a way that's technically off-label, but not in violation of the applicable listing requirements or product standard. In ...


3

The first option that comes to mind is U-strut. (Channel strut or C-channel) Photo from fireequip.com.au The first two struts would be mounted vertically on studs with at least three points. Use double ended lag screws, (wood threads on one side and machine threads on the other) Pilot drill through the siding/foam board and into a stud. Drive the ...


3

Yes Sure, that ought to be possible. That looks like an automatic transfer switch. It was set up on only one of the two 200A feeds to your house. Presumably whoever wired your house was conscientious about putting important loads on that panel. However, the switch is not hooked up. The wires bypass the switch. They left you some slack, but not enough ...


2

Same meter, then yes, you can, But -- A wise man will not use all the circuits in a new breaker box. The day you find the one you forgot about, there is no place for it to go. The prewired tail on the reliance manual boxes are just not designed to work the way you want. Each circuit has to run from the wire that is under the breaker, to the reliance box ...


2

I will join longneck, you need to give to give this one to a pro. If you do not understand about back-feeding a circuit, already, it is too easy to kill someone. I say this without exaggeration. The biggest problem with running a generator with a transfer switch is that you have to wire it into your main panel. For basic protection of life, (as well as ...


2

No. The wiring and the breaker are sized for the needs of a single dryer. To connect several would create a situation where overload is likely, or at least a possibility. A possible workaround, with questions of legality outstanding, would be to install a lockout mechanism or switch that would prevent simultaneous use of both dryers.


2

A DPDT air conditioning relay should do the trick House 2 is connected by default. When House 1 calls for water, it "takes over" and powers the well itself. Air conditioning relays are rated at 30A and are rated to start motors. It's a 2-pole relay, and it switches both hots, but not ground. This setup must not use neutral: if it does, get a 3-pole ...


2

You can tap this What you want to do here is replace the existing set of 3-way splice connectors that tap the feeder for the surge protector with 4-ways, and then use the newly opened connector-ports to run a feeder up to the transfer switch. You're fine on size The reason why the existing feeder is 2AWG is because it's copper most likely -- 2AWG copper ...


2

You can't put GFCI, AFCI or MWBC circuits on transfer switches. I'm referring to the flimsy 6, 8 or 10 circuit switches that let you flip each circuit to utility or gen individually. And you have both GFCI and MWBC. So, yeah, not gonna happen. That panel should have never been recommended to you. Unfortunately generator salesmen recommend that type ...


2

The root problem is you are modifying an appliance that is UL-listed, thus, voiding the UL listing. And further, you create a situation that Code really does not like, where a procedure is essential to safety. Code wants interlocks to be mechanical. Assuming this thing has an internal GFCI to keep you honest, the problem is on the other side: when you've ...


2

Easy. The bog-standard way of provisioning 400A service to a residence is to fit dual 200A panels. Because 200A gear is readily available at sane cost (e.g. $120/panel) in the consumer space, whereas true 400A gear requires you go into industrial-tier arcana, with industrial-tier pricing (i.e. nobody blinks at $3000/panel). In your case, from the equipment ...


1

Ground wires between boxes can be solid or stranded. Most likely in wires this big, they will be stranded. Grounds must be colored bare, green, or green/yellow. Those three "colors" are reserved for ground.


1

That is the right way to do it! A transfer switch to an ordinary subpanel. Remember to separate neutral and ground at all points. You would use a 100A breaker. The 100A is at 240V, so you could put 80A of 240V heaters onto that breaker/sub. (because you must derate heater loads by 20%). At 120V it is good for both legs. That is, with 120V loads, you ...


1

Here's the better way to do a "transfer switch" A lot of transfer switch products are designed to "bolt on" to your existing panels. They are expensive, add a lot of spaghetti or both. No thanks. I prefer reliable Tier 1 service equipment suppliers, the kind big companies like Google or Ford use when their power matters. Here we use Siemens. If you're ...


1

You're just as well off trenching in a conduit The rub with what you're describing is that you'd have to switch both ends of the feeder cable to make it work, with all the logic based on the presence of utility power at the main house end. As a result of the extra control wiring that would likely be needed to control the shed-end switching, you are just as ...


1

You have the wrong tool for the job here The fact you have standby circuits split across the two panels means you can't use the transfer switch you have, or really any "select circuit" type of transfer switch for that matter. In fact, installing your current transfer switch would lead to a Code violation, in particular of the rules in 300.3(B) and 310.10(H)...


1

Edit: After looking at this further, I think it should be done a different way. First, get rid of the octopus for reasons I describe below. This is a nice, modern panel for which interlocks should be available. Get a generator interlock which interlocks between the main breaker in your panel, and a breaker in the top row. This top row breaker backfeeds to ...


1

Your guess is correct. You will not be able to use a single transfer switch in one of the panels to isolate your generator for both panels. The solution may be to discontinue the use of the water heater specific panel and re-wire the water heater into the main panel. Then the single transfer switch in the main panel would work out nicely. Keep in mind ...


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