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1

This is a faucet that is designed to install from the top only. Price Pfister calls it Top Pfit. The piece you have pictured was probably over tightened, bent, and popped off. It works like a toggle bolt. It lines up with the pipe to slip into the sink hole then it flops down to a horizontal position where you use a nut or screw on the top side to ...


0

It looks like a gravity toggle. If so it's holes should fit over the lugs of the nut part having its arched part facing down.


0

If you don't need a semi-rigid cable, Teslong makes an inexpensive USB borescope with a 50' cable ($28). I've used this with my laptop to examine my HVAC system, and it is apparently compatible with most smartphones (although I haven't had any luck finding a USB adapter that fits my Google Pixel).


1

If the hole is dead center it is the center of a 2x4 framing post ( which are acttualy 1 and 1/2 inches wide) so the center is at 3/4ths of an inch.You can place the hole over the marks made every 16 inches as an example for frame posts and then mark both sides along rhe width of the tongue because it is the same width of a 2x4


0

Picture frame clamp. check Hobby Lobby or equal


2

Of the four images the top one looks to show a torx (or similar - there are other designs). Torx are available in very small sizes and are widely used in laptop computers for example. A T1, the smallest is only 0.81mm across the points of the driver. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torx


2

You access the top of the screw. It probably has a philips head on it. The means of removing the seat varies. I am not an expert on this but I happen to have seen a couple of these recently. One had a button on the bottom of the lid at the centre - with lids upright. Depress button (well it lifts up away from the floor), lift lids gently and the lids come ...


4

Well it looks like a « 3 in 1 » to locate or align the holes in workpieces, then tap a thread and finally install a bolt with a square head. Square head bolts tend to be for older things but not sure what industry that was designed for.


5

The other answers aren't wrong, but may be optimistic. On mine, the heads weren't accessible from above - the chromed metal covers weren't going to come off with any reasonable force. I managed to unscrew the whole seat by using mole grips (AKA vise grips, self-locking pliers) on the exposed threads, and used the same method to refit it. I could have ...


31

That is called a blind jack nut, jack nut, blind collapsing nut, etc. They are typically used when you don't have access to and/or don't have the tools to hold onto a nut on the backside of whatever you're putting it into. As you turn the bolt the wedge will move along its length, moving into/out of the split nut which adds/removes force that pushes the ...


8

That is a collapsible nut that fits into various size holes. As the comment says, undo the bolt from the top - you may have a plastic cover to remove. But no image so my "goto" is usually a small screwdriver - just don't stab a finger with it. Note that if you keep tension on the bolt head by pulling on it as you unscrew it then the "nut" will stay located ...


0

It turns out it was a combination of the 2 following issues : Underfed saw : My extension cord did not transfer 240V but 120V only Old blade : Blade was pretty worn out


7

It's an antique wallpaper cutter: Yours looks a little rusty, missing some parts, and it looks like you’ve had a replacement wheel that's a little bit smaller.


5

What is the horse power of the motor? What is the rating of the circuit breaker? Are you running on an extension cord? Circuit breakers can take some time to trip if the overload is small. As the motor slows, it draws more current. If a saw has been moved, it may no longer be in alignment. Using a vernier caliper check that the blade is parallel to the ...


6

There could be several issues that cause the blade other than a dull blade, you have hit on squeezing the blade with the rip fence and chip board will get chewed up a little even with some squeeze, since it’s not that a loose belt is another possibility and the last thing I have seen a few times is the pulley on the motor shaft or the saw arbor is loose, ...


8

Examine the blade disk to see if it has become gummy or coated with resin. You may have to remove the blade and scrub it clean. If the saw is not new the blade may be quite worn and need replacement. The teeth of a saw are bent slightly to the side (usually every other tooth to each side) to make the cut wider than the saw blade. Sometimes a saw blade ...


1

Just bought the Cordless Combi Hammer Drill (PKHAP 20Li-A1) which is the "Performance" series of Parkside tools. I bought it because i already have the angle grinder and drill/screw machine. Both from the "Performance" series. And i'm very disappointed to see that the new Performance Series uses the old line of batteries "X 20V Team". And my first 2 ...


2

This is deceptively hard to test. When torque is specified for a fastener, it's really the torque that should be applied when the fastener is installed. Your test, which I believe is called a "first movement test" - creeping up on the torque until the fastener moves - tests how much torque it takes to make it tighter right now. You might naturally ...


0

I would do the opposite, ie trying to tighten the bolt and finding the amount of torque to just make it move increasing the tightness.


1

Others have correctly identified that the backing plate with the hooks is a replaceable wear item on the sander. What others haven't mentioned is that your technique with the tool can accelerate its wear. Let the sand paper do its job and also learn to recognize when it is worn out. Don't exert excessive pressure on the sander in an attempt to make the sand ...


1

I have owned five different brands of sanders that use hook and loop attachment. Every sander, after four or five uses will no longer hold the paper. I purchased a new pad for the Porter Cable sander and again after four or five uses it will no longer hold the paper. The new pads cost about $10. That is too expensive. It is difficult to find a sander that ...


1

I would use a router with a carbide bit, a jig to hold everything steady, a pin set at a distance to index each slot. The router would use a guide bushing, the jig would set the angle and length of cut and distance apart with the indexing pin. The side frame material would be pierced through fully, but not cut edge to edge so as to cut into multiple ...


0

How about a miter saw with metal abrasive blade. Set the angle and one sweep could give you the depth and width and you'd be able to see what's happening. Just a thought.


1

I believe this can be done in a home-shop environment using a table saw with a carbide tipped blade. I cut 25 mm square aluminum tube often enough without harming the saw. The swarf is a bit of a mess, as one might expect. The challenge here is to properly index the cuts. As you require 4 mm slots, it means two passes for each slot, along with the need to ...


4

It could be used for any of the following, depending on size: A Schrader valve core tool, used for automotive tires (see examples) A wing-nut tool, useful in tight places or to apply more force A wire-wrap tool, if there is a recess at the end of the shaft A tool for hand-bending metal contacts or light wire


2

It looks like a broken breaker bar with the end ground down for some specialty job. They are manufactured by many companies but here's a similar piece about the same size or it could be a larger one cut down.


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