18

Prior to drilling the "through-hole", mark the location on both sides and use a paddle-style wood boring bit slightly larger than the O.D. of your flat washer, to make a large flat-bottomed hole. Make the holes no deeper than necessary to make the nut, washer, and bolt end sit flush (you would need a shorter bolt). For more precise creation of a flat-...


14

Studs are cut to length at the mill so you can build your 8’ walls without cutting the ends off the top and bottom plates with studs make a quick tilt up wall, the rest is true 8’ 10’ 12’ . Note if remodeling verify length prior to building a wall.


10

Ahhh… the sacrificial roof concept. My friend decided to buy an extra small car because if he got into a accident, he thought his car would just bounce off the big cars, trucks, etc. and he’d be safe. I don’t think it works that way. You have a couple of issues: 1) uplift, and 2) blow down (shear). Uplift comes in two forms: wind blowing on a wall and then ...


8

Yes, but you'd need to repurpose existing common studs as jack studs. This may mean using a wider (longer) header than would ordinarily be needed. Obviously this means opening up the wall more than you'd maybe like, but it's all kept up above the tub where it's more easily repairable. _________________________________________________ ...


7

And another option would be to use a beveled washer. I would use a dado for all of the joints in all of the answers just to avoid slippage strain on the bolt/wood interface.


7

Framing is structural, not cosmetic. So wood splinters and rough cuts are not an issue as long as they are carrying the load above and provide a good nailing surface at the correct locations. The part of the home you see, drywall (particularly the mudding), cabinets, flooring, etc, is where you make sure it looks good for appearance, but those looks don't ...


6

According to Table R602.3(1) of the International residential code (IRC), you have to use two 16d (3 1/2" x 0.135") fasteners to end nail the top or sole plate to a stud. If the studs were toe nailed to the sole plate, then either three 8d (2 1/2" x 0.133") or two 16d (3 1/2" x 0.135") fasteners would be required. International Residential Code 2012 ...


5

The simplest way is to recess the washer and nut into the angled brace. Using a spade bit slightly larger than the washer Mark where you want the hole. Start a hole in the right side face of the brace, perpendicular to the face of the wood. As soon as the tip of the bit has a good bite, angle the drill until it is perpendicular to the opposite angle cut of ...


5

You have a complicated question here and the best (and most legally-correct) answer will probably come from talking to your local building inspector. Preferably before a lot of work has already been done... First, the question of which building code is even applicable is not clear to me. The International Residential Code ("IRC") only applies for 1- and 2-...


5

Set a steel pin (1-2cm diameter) or post-base-bracket in the concrete. Drill a hole in the bottom of the post for the pin, or attach the bracket to the post bottom - no lateral movement, also no accelerated rot. Rot is effectively guaranteed if you set the post into concrete. Brackets designed for the job maintain a small space between the concrete and the ...


5

I don't think those rafter ties will work for support. The width of the room isn't what's important so much as the span from support to support. I can't imagine a garage layout that would have a span short enough to make with 2x4's, even sistered. You'd also have to have the attachments to the top plate of the walls adequate to support the weight of the ...


5

These nails are not meant to sink even with the wood. If your framing is done right these nails should provide nothing more than bump resistance for the wall. Your framing should be very snug to joists and let the wood get itself straight. Meaning that the nails at the plates don't do much. When I am framing a basement I usually put in 3 per 8' board. ...


5

If this is a base plate on the floor for a wall, you're fine as is and it pretty much happens to everyone. The nail is embedded in concrete, the floor keeps the base plate from moving lower, the nail's job is to keep it from moving side to side, and the wall you build on top of it is what will keep it from lifting up the small distance you see there. I ...


5

Given that you don't have joist hangers, the solution seems clear to me. Set your three posts under three beams. Lay your joists across the beams. __________________________________________________ | |_____________| |______________| |_____________| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |...


4

I will guarantee you that plate will stay there until somebody pulls it up. There is a good bury on the nail point, you could strike it with a hammer if the plate is stable. If plate vibrates, there is a strong possibility that the nail will blow out a big chip and the nail will loose what hold it had. To solve it, use a red load, that should get it down ...


4

Minor variation to recessed holes, if you don't have or don't want to buy a spade or Forstner bit: cut a flat face into the angled support. Ensure that you leave at least 50% of the width of the angled support for strength.


4

That stub wall does likely provide some support to stiffen the stairway. That said it would appear that the vertical stud that you circled in purple could be removed without any trouble. I would not suggest removing any other parts and leaving the horizontal double member in place. If you removed that it would leave a mess in regards to the already ...


4

Go to the library and check out a book on building decks. There are commonly accepted specifications and construction methods for decks, and a good book will walk you through the design and building processes. Also, local building codes may have something to say about the construction of a deck.


4

Leave it as-is, but add furring strips to the wall studs to bring them in line. I would increase the thickness of the furring strips in steps of 1/8" across the length of the 16' wall. So probably: start with a pair of 1/2" strips then drop to 3/8" for the next 3 then 3 at 1/4" then down to 1/8 for 3 more then leave the last few with ...


3

There are multiple reasons for outside paint to peel and crack. It can be hard to pin down if it is a application issue or just an outside factor. But as you state it was applied on newly installed (non-aged) wood has me tending toward that aspect. Based on the product data sheet DATA SHEET the following is listed, "Pressure treated timber should be ...


3

In the UK, house construction is divided into separate stages "first fix" and "second fix" first-fix includes carpentry that the eventual occupier of the house won't see. For example the woodwork inside stud-walls. It is expected and normal that this isn't finished to the standard you would expect of a second-fix carpenter and not to the standard you would ...


3

You need to do the math. Check out this free calculator or consult floor joist span tables for what you are doing. This calculator shows 2x4's limited to 5'8" span for eastern white pine. Also the type of lumber is important. http://www.awc.org/codes-standards/calculators-software/spancalc What you plan to do with the room is not relevant. If you build ...


3

The roof loading transmits straight down, so the shorter wall and the taller wall will be bearing exactly the same roof load. Shed roofs can leave the structure a bit more prone to racking, which is basically the tendency of a square to deform into a trapezoid: You'll be fine if you do a couple of things. First, sheath the walls with 4' x 8' sheet material ...


3

Can you - yes - with the application of sufficient money, anything is possible. Will it be cost-effective - probably not. Building, and then destroying a roof is a very expensive proposition. Removing roof framing and replacing it with an additional floor, likewise. If you wanted to do this in a way that might make fiscal sense, have the frame designed as ...


3

I see your concern but there's really no discrepancy. The tiny pilot holes you will drill for your #10 screws to mount your projector do not remove any significant amount of material from the joist. They also don't go all the way through, just an inch or so. They won't significantly change the strength of the joist. If you were drilling a 3/4" hole ...


3

Can I use your canoe rack to drive my quad up and work on it? That is a bit over built but will be rock solid. Make your cuts tight when using pegs everything is a friction fit but you have it well laid out. It appears you will be just setting it on the ground so you can move it that would be my justification for the lower horizontal braces. This should ...


3

You didn’t give us all the info we need, but I’ll make some assumptions and you tell me if I’m wrong. Calculating the maximum load depends on 1) species and grade, 2) length of stud, 3) fastened to narrow side or wide side of stud. I’d use a common species (here in the U.S.) of SPF and a common grade of No. 2 and Better. I’d use 8’ unsupported length. (If ...


3

My great-uncle had a small shed/barn that had a flat roof and got torn apart by an extremely strong windstorm. When he rebuilt it, he made several adjustments to help it survive heavy winds. He left about two inches of open space between the top of the walls and the bottom of the roof. He also installed a couple of roof vents. His general idea was instead ...


3

How about adding an option (5). The thinking is to evenly distribute the floor load to the edge beams, so the edge beams will be stressed less and deflect less than a concentrated load from the center joist. Since it is now stiffer and the space between joists is much smaller for the deck board to bridge over, the board can be thinner, and directly nailed ...


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