6

The internal threaded part made by the tap needs to be slightly larger than the external threaded part made by the die (else it would not screw in). As a result of this requirement the tap will be larger than the die and won't fit inside.


4

Put the cone on a spindle so it unrolls/unwinds, rather than pulling it off the end.


3

Some DIY ideas... 1 Get yourself a chunk of mild steel or aluminum, some drill bits, and a couple taps. Build a two-sized coupling nut. You probably have a neighbor who has a tap set. You may want to use jam nuts to lock the rods into the sleeve. |=| |=| _|_|_|_ | |=| | | |=| | | | | |=| | |__|=|__| ...


3

They don't in my experience. However, that is not a litmus test of a tap and die. The litmus test is whether threads they cut will mesh.


3

When pipe is cut with a blade it can result in material debris and/or metal filings or oxides inside the pipe. This is equivalent to dangerous sediments or solids in a gas line which can damage or clog equipment. Pipes cut with a blade will likely need to be cleaned and/or flushed before use. Imagine PVC filings clogging a sprinkler head. Using something ...


2

How much clearance do you have between the threaded portion and the hole you want to insert the bolt in? In most cases,the shank is cut first and then the threads are cut so the threaded portion will usually be a bit smaller than the shank. If the threaded portion fits snugly into the hole, you'll have a problem. If it's a loose fit, you'll be OK. You might ...


2

Unthreaded portions of bolts are generally just a tick under their nominal diameter. So an 8mm bolt might be 7.8mm across the shaft. Typically, the OD of threaded areas is smaller than that, so it might be an issue. You also have the possibility of bottoming out the threads if the screw goes deep into the threaded portion.


2

Faucet spout aerator and hose threads come in many different sizes and threads. There is no real standardization between makes and models. Some hose fittings may even be proprietary, as in deliberately not adaptable to other items. This is because assemblies with a hose/sprayer that could accidentally be dropped into dirty water often must be designed with ...


2

I solved this by using a pipe repair clamp from the plumbing department. It is meant to seal pinhole leaks in pipe. It looks like a 3-4" long bracket that clamps to the pipe --not in this case the floor lamp tubing-- and has a rubber, inner liner. Get one in the 1" or greater size. It has two parallel bolts that tighten to clamp it all together. It'...


2

A die is not a blade. That is what makes threads. A pipe cutter uses a round wheel that is not sharp but is tapered to a dull point. I make hundreds of threads and pipe length adjustments. Saying no blade may mean that if the end of a pipe thread is not filed it can slice you open as fast as a cutco knife from the factory. I have made thousands of threads ...


1

I would drill out the plastic and glue in a plastic rod of a suitable diameter then re-drill the hole as necessary. This does of course depend on the thickness of the material that is being worked with. Another option is to glue a fresh piece of plastic behind to give more support to the screw.


1

You could try removing your tape, plastic collar and foam. Then carefully place a forming sleeve over the gap that spans between 270 degrees and 315 degrees of the circumference of the gap around the tubing post. This cover can be made from any one of a number of materials and if it is made long enough beyond the gap width you can use strong tape to hold it ...


1

There are small filters that can be installed on the end of the faucet made by Pur, Brita, and Culligan and others that have a charcoal filter and can be turned on/off when filtered drinking water is desired. You could also install a cartridge filter inside the cabinet under the sink and connected to the cold water line. Looking at the picture you posted I ...


1

I haven't seen Teflon do that before. It looks like a black pipe dope or sealer was applied over the Teflon to stop a leak. There are many different colors of pipe sealers. According to @Kris, Rectorseal makes a black one, #7, for use with corrosive chemicals and active solvents and it also specifies for metal pipes only. We'll never really know what's ...


1

A bit of lateral thinking: Leave the factory inserts at the end of the tube alone. Cut a section out of the center of the tube. Purchase a set of matching threaded inserts and a short length of all-thread with matching threads. Insert a threaded insert into each of the newly cut ends, holding them in place with epoxy. Screw together to make a shorter tube ...


1

Cut the rod to the desired length. Then get a rotary tool like a Dremel with a cutoff disk. Cut the tubing that holds the insert lengthwise down to the surface of the insert. Make three or four cuts. Then pry the tubing apart with a slotted screwdriver, freeing up the insert. Slightly chamfer the inside edge of the shortened length of tubing and tap/pound ...


1

The coiled stainless thread repair kits are the best in my opinion they provide a stronger thread because the larger diameter threads on the outside are stronger and the stainless insert is harder providing a superior hold to softer metals and plastics. I would suggest using some thread locker to hold the repair kit in place. Thread locker is not a always ...


1

If you search for antique lighting parts supplies, you'll find "hickeys" ready-made that are essentially what @isherwood describes as #1 and #2. The first picture are a couple of hickeys from my box of lighting junk. Neither of these are in the sizes you want but they come in different sizes. There are also reducing bushings such as in the ...


1

Technically that is threaded rod not a threaded insert. A threaded insert would be an insert with threads to accept a threaded rod or machine screw. Get two nuts that fit the threads, thread the first nut on far enough that you can get the second nut on. Using two open ended wrenches ( or adjustable wrenches will work ) tighten one nut up very tight ...


1

Most bolts that have an unthreaded portion or shank are designed that the shank is to support the shear loads and provide more loadbearing surface than just threads. The shank is usually larger or the same as the outer diameter of the thread so it fits reasonably tightly in the holes of the pieces to be secured. Thise pieces are designed so the depth of ...


1

The way I read the section it feels like they are trying to say "this process is specific for pipes, and we can't cut anything else even if it is pipe shaped. There is no blade, just special wheels and machines that only cut pipe threads".


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