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19

Spackle might work, however it is specially designed for repairing holes and cracks and is more expensive than the product that is normally used for doing a skim coat: regular joint compound or topping compound. You should do a bit of research and plan to practice with wide trowels/mud knives if you intend to do this yourself. Hanging the drywall is not the ...


7

I just completed a similar project. I skim coated my bathroom walls with joint compound to cover up a paint job from a previous tenant that had resulted in crackling and flaking over the entire surface of the drywall. You can read a bit about the difference between drywall joint compound (mud) and spackle here, but there a few chief differences in ...


3

It's either poorly prepared compound or poor application technique. I assume you're asking this because the are finished with the work. If that's the case, this is substandard work, in my opinion at least, and should be corrected.


3

Have you ever tried to install the terrible interior doors Menards sells with the MDF casing? (yea we ordered 3 on sale not understanding the casing was made out of a thick cooked noodle - if the doors were a circle this would be a great idea) I am asking because if you use the 1/4" drywall to go over a ceiling the MDF door is the only way you can easily ...


3

That doesn't look like drywall texture to me. It looks like stippling from a heavy-nap roller. The reason you don't see it along the trim is because a brush was used there. When you paint, do the brush edging, then immediately roll over it as close as you can to the trim. This will minimize the smooth strip.


3

Using spackle to smooth the texture will be more expensive than using joint compound. Both will set hard and have about the same working and setting time. The problem with trying to smooth an already textured ceiling will take a lot of work and depends on the how course or textured it is now. It can be accomplished by a diligent DIY-er and the correct tools. ...


2

Sanding is going to be extremely time consuming and also very VERY messy. The best approach I've seen is to wet the material with a sprayer and then as it begins to soften, scrape it off down to the drywall. After that you will likely need to touch up the surface but I think you'll be a lot better off in a lot shorter time than with sanding.


1

I don't know about spackle being more expensive. I am going to disagree with most on here on that point (and I am right). Notes: there are more variations of spackle than joint compound (drywall mud) spackle is much much harder to smooth in bigger areas spackle is much much harder to sand no matter what you do, you have to get rid of most of the knockdown ...


1

If you spray it (recommended) you're going to want to buy a large metal scraper with a handle - and you really want to make sure you're getting it wet. This could be one of those jobs easier for a pro - its not awfully expensive and just google popcorn removal - same guys take the swirly stuff down. In and out in a day for 1 large room easily.- Option 2 is ...


1

OK, i can identify it. It is That ugly texture for the 70's that the neighbor lady talked my mom into letter her put on my bedroom ceiling. She also did one on the living room ceiling that was like a swirl, she would dip a brush in mud, stick it on the ceiling (poke the ceiling) and turn it before pulling straight away from the ceiling. I think she had ...


1

Should we use kilz or zinnser prior to doing the skim coat Or will the skim coat cover the stains/odor? You want to seal the stains first and then skim. In my experience cigarette stains will bleed through most primers and paints. The most effective way to seal them is to use a shellac based primer I would give it at least two coats of the shellac primer. (...


1

I don't think there's an actual name for this, maybe grade school art. After doing all your patching and smoothing out the wall, get a 1" knife, putty knife, dip it in some drywall mud and dap it on the wall. Do it a couple of times without redipping to get the thinner, smaller lines. Dap and twist a bit to get the uneven lines. After it partially dries,...


1

You say "paint-like" texture. Are you sure it's paint? If it's paint, any sort of chemical paint stripper should do the trick. There are quite a number of more "friendly" "citrus" or "orange" based paint strippers that don't have the smell and toxic concerns of paint strippers of the past. I presume a patio is outdoors,...


1

It looks like the material was applied with a wide notched trowel then gone over with a roller. The way all the ridges are lined up, makes it appear that was part of the technique. Then a roller whether it was dampened with water, or lightly set with texture, was run one way to get the ridges to point in one direction, then it was moved over or angled over ...


1

That looks somewhat like a "knock down" texture. The ceilings in my house look like this: This type of texture can take on many variations of look which can depend on the consistency of the mud when it was spattered on, type of spray gun and nozzle used and how long the material has dried before you knock it down with a knock down tool or other wide drywall ...


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