Hot answers tagged

35

Use painters tape (blue tape, Frog tape, lots of different names and brands) to mask off the areas you don't want to paint green. First, paint your ceiling and 3 walls white (2 or 3 coats, however many are needed) and wait for the paint to dry. Then, apply the painters tape to those walls and ceiling as close to the 4th wall as possible. Next, and this is ...


18

In my experience, tape just doesn't do that well. Even if you get a clean line, you're at the mercy of the tape's shape, and it's following the texture. It often ends up looking artificially sharp and jaggy. Instead, use what I call the twitch technique, which is a variation of the standard cut-in. Load your brush on one side, just an inch deep or so. ...


14

I never tape anything and people are amazed at the crisp lines I paint in my home. I use a high quality angled brush for this. Depending on my wrist fatigue and room, I work from either left to right, or vice versa with this technique. This is self-taught and I have no idea if their is a name for this. I load the brush up with plenty of paint and then ...


6

I just got an answer by email from the owner of a company in France that specializes in artisanal plaster work. He recognizes it as a very thin lime-plaster that was applied with a bundle of leaves like these: with a whipping motion. He calls this type of finish an enduit fouetté which translates as whipped lime-plaster. He suggests that we mix a very thin ...


5

The point of Green Glue is to create a flexible layer of never fully firm glue between layers of drywall, right? To absorb sound? In which case, I think you'll need to first level the ceiling, then apply green glue, then apply your final layer. Otherwise, if you green glue over top of the texture, you'll have high points in the texture that touch the new ...


4

Like Karl, I just riped the drywall out completely rather than trying to fix it in my own home. But if you go the pole sander route, then I'd measure out where the non-beveled joints are going to go (the 4' side of a 4x8 sheet) and just sand those areas, maybe 6" to either side of the joint. The drywall will bend in slightly at the joint and you fill the ...


3

Scraping then taping will work. Re-blending the new and old textures invisibly is nearly impossible. Consider replacing 3 to 4ft instead of 12" and adding a wainscot or just a chair rail and leave the bottom smooth.


3

That is in fact a "sand finish", your intuition was right. Now depending on the age of the house it could be sand added to the plaster, added to the mud, or a "sand finish" paint. The last is your best hope of matching, as you would drywall it all smooth then simply use brushstrokes to recreate the pattern. There are premixed sand paints amazingly enough....


3

No - It will never match the original pattern. But we had similar issues in many apartments where we couldn't just leave a bold spot. So we had to re do that "area" area being keyword here. Afterwards apply some undercoats to the area that was redone (we did ours with a concrete mix but some have silicone or other types) Only you will see exactly where ...


3

It's not something you need to remove. However, how thick is the drywall that you're putting up? If it's 1/2 or 5/8", ok, but I'd be worried about how much weight you're adding. If you're putting up 3/8 or if you managed to find some 1/4", you're going to show every bump and ridge beneath it. You probably want to use half inch, and you might think about ...


3

I would remove it, then your drywall sandwich has no gaps between it and will allow for better attachment. But its not popcorn so it may not be as simple as a scrape with a trowel. If it is really a bear to take off, you could try a test piece without removing it and see how it looks and attaches. If the next ceiling is smooth, I would be somewhat ...


3

Most stucco/plaster patterns/textures aren't/weren't created by any particular tools but rather by incredibly highly skilled craftsmen. In other words, the pattern was created via decades of experience and skills rather than a particular tool. We have a stucco house and over the years I've talked to a few contractors and they all said the same thing...good ...


3

I have the same thing. We used two methods: 1st we used a sander to lower the high points of the texture, this is something you want to use as last resort. After the sanding was finished I did a skim coat, then had to sand again to smooth the skim coat. Super labor intensive. The next room I just put up 3/8 drywall, took half the time. It seems more ...


3

As with many textures, it is likely formed from water-soluble base like drywall topcoat. If so, spray it with water from a spray bottle until you think it's saturated enough then take a wide drywall knife and see if you ca scrape it off. If this works, you'll need to tape and re-texture afterwards. Alternatively, a drywaller can skimcoat over the top of it, ...


3

You should prime it first. Primer is essential to get good adhesion and coverage. If you're really trying to avoid applying two coats, the next best thing would be a paint + primer combo.


3

The previous owners of my house did this. Drywall compound will stick very well to wood paneling (please resist the urge to get "creative" with the texture...). Wallpaper, less so, and even if it sticks well, if the wallpaper ever started peeling off, it would take the top part of the wall with it. If you're going down this route, I would highly recommend ...


3

I have used hot mud in a texture gun. Make sure to run it wet or it may plug the gun and cause problems. If you notice it setting up before the hopper is empty dump it and wash the gun or your gun may be toast. hot mud sets harder than regular mud. Both mixes will work fine and when you have your orifices set you can get the thickness you desire. Just a note ...


3

Expect to experiment to obtain the finer points. You can do that on the actual repair surface. If an attempt doesn't come out well, wipe it off immediately while it is still wet and workable. Then let the wall dry (10-30 minutes depending on ambient temperature and humidity) and repeat. Start with the wall clean, free of dust and dirt. Depending on the ...


3

If you decide to use tape rather than learning how to cut in with a brush, make sure you use the blue type masking tape and also run a flexible painters scraper along the inside edge to really seal the inside edge down. If you don't, you're guaranteed to get some 'bleed' underneath the edge of the tape.


3

I beg to differ and offer an alternative to other answers offering the best way to achieve a nice crisp edge. From my experience, the best way to achieve a good looking corner interface between different wall colors is that You don't. Especially if the surface of one of the walls which meet in said corner is textured. A good looking straight and nice line ...


3

It's a texture made with a stippling brush: https://drywall101.com/articles/texturegroups.php https://www.lowes.com/pd/Marshalltown-9-in-Natural-Stippling-Faux-Finish-Paint-Brush/1000204375 I would suggest keeping it because otherwise you're just creating unnecessary work for yourself. Probably can't scrape it smooth so you would probably have to replace ...


3

I haven't tried it on a textured wall, but have similar issues with uneven plaster and lath. Try maintaining a steady speed and pressure on the stud finder as you sweep across the wall. (I'm much more steady with my right hand than my left.) Try going both directions - left to right, and right to left - at several different heights. Most walls have light ...


2

This kind of textured coatingis generally known as Artex in the UK (Wikipedia link.). Take great care if you set to it with a sander as other answers have suggested, as old Artex can contain asbestos. The two ways I've dealt with it previously have been to either skim over it or to remove it by first using a scraper to knock the tops off the peaks then to ...


2

You should. Something is needed to seal the new drywall. Primer is much cheaper than paint. The basic rule is if you want a wall to look uniform, you have to prime it first. If this is a paint + texture can, when left unprimed, the drywall will suck all the paint from the texture into the wall, leaving an uneven mess behind. If you're going to paint ...


2

If you are like me & don't have a straight hand to save your sole here are a few tips that may be helpfull. The first method is to tape along the ceiling and with using the exact color you used to paint your ceiling, apply a thin coat along the tape line between your wall & ceiling (this acts as a barrier & will not allow your new wall color to ...


2

It sounds like you have a mud swirl pattern on your ceiling. These can be difficult to match an existing pattern to a repair. Practice matching the pattern on scrap pieces of drywall by changing the consistency of the mix (thicker or looser) as well as how the mix applied until the pattern is replicated. Practice will enable a good match when it comes ...


2

All kinds of designers paint require the experience and skill of a professional artist or painter to achieve a faux finish. One unfamiliar with such finishes could waste gallons of paint, tons of nerves and never even get close to the way it's supposed to look. Adding color to the primer would be helpful, but learning real faux painting techniques; even ...


2

Either apply a skim coat (or 2 or 3) where you smooth the entire surface... Tedious but it will work - use the widest blade you can and do each coat perpendicular to the last. or... add a new layer of 1/8" drywall over the existing and mud/tape the seams.


2

+1 on Elf's brush technique. I would add: using a small scraper or careful use of a partially exposed utility knife, to remove the texture just on either side of the inside corner. Then I would deliberately overpaint the ceiling paint onto to wall a bit (1" or so). Then go back with EvilElfs loaded brush and cut towards the ceiling. The overpainted ...


2

Spray and roll, more commonly called spray and backroll around me is when you spray the paint on and then another person follows behind you with a roller to roll the freshly spread paint. One of the reasons to do it is to get more even coverage in textured ceilings. It's easier to do with two people so if it's just you might just want to skip the sprayer to ...


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