7

Your local home center(Lowes/HomeDepot) should have 12inch x 12inch concrete patio blocks for about $2 each, even less if you find some with chipped corners. Since it is a short term project I would just lay them on the dirt following the original line. The blocks should spread the load enough that they won't sink too deep into the mud. When it's time to ...


6

Wrap one end of the rope around a pillar 3-4 times, tie the loose end back to the standing portion of the rope (probably with a bowline), and then slide the wraps up to the top of the pillar so that the part furthest from the knot is highest, with the rope smoothly wrapping down from that point. Do the same for the other end, tightening the rope enough to ...


5

The manufacturer's installation instructions should contain a section on how to properly install a three prong cord on the dryer. Buy a three prong cord, and follow the instructions to install it. Keep the 4 prong cord, in case the next place has a 4 prong receptacle. If you don't have the manufacturer's installation instructions for the dryer, you can ...


2

I'd mount barrel bolts to the beam vertically, then install flat strike plates on top of the panels. If necessary, use shims or bushings to move the bolts out from the beam slightly, leaving them closer to the center of the panels' thickness. If the panels want to rattle, put a row of thick, soft foam tape on the beam, between it and the panels, to create ...


2

If you were to attach a filler strip along the beam that matched the thickness of your wall panels ... see below: You could use any one of a number of types of catches. One example is this standard type of window casement latch:


2

Tie a siberian hitch at one end, then a tightenable siberian hitch, taut-line hitch, or trucker's hitch at the other. This YouTube video demonstrates the siberian hitch, and tightenable siberian hitch Folks use these knots to tie lines between trees for tarps, tents, and for hanging hammocks. If they're good enough to hang a backpacker between two trees, ...


2

For outlets, there are pre-cut foam gaskets that fit under the faceplates. You could leave those or remove when you go, as you prefer. For windows that you will leave closed all winter, shrink film window sealing kits cover the whole window (best to put them all the way to the outside edge of the frame) and are fairly clear and non-obtrusive once shrunk, ...


2

Update: with all the concerns you can also use what is called Mass Loaded Vinyl which is normally used in a non abrasive method which is good for places such as rentals, flats, homes etc. Mass Loaded Vinyl is used to reduce airborne sound transmission through walls, floors and ceilings. They are typically comprised of a limp-mass material sound ...


2

If the “old hip roof” sits on a double top plate, you can just support the double top plate with 2x4’s set at an angle from the floor up through the ceiling up to the bottom of the top plate. About 8’ of an interior bearing wall supporting an old hip roof does not “carry” that much weight. I’m sure a couple of 2x4 angle braces can TEMPORARILY support the ...


2

The only reasonable way I can think of is to buy an outdoor rated panel and put it on a wall outside right next to where you will be working, with some temporary duct work for the conductors going back into the house. You will at some point need to call your utility for a disconnect / meter pull to move the main conductors, but wait until the last minute for ...


2

Why not build a drywall curtain. Base plate pinned to concrete floor with a few Tapcon type screws. Studs wedged between base plate and joists. If wider than 4 feet, add a vertical stud. Cover in drywall. NOTE THIS IS NOT CODE AND MUST BE TEMPORARY ONLY! Create a two or three sided room (but be sure to leave access, like a hinged plywood panel with a ...


1

I'm going with paint. Research elsewhere on the net found some interesting stories about people putting down a new floor after a P&S floor. Getting the old tiles up, and removing the glue was a serious PITA, right up there with older style glue down floors. So... A "Temporary" floor should be done in such a way that it is easy to remove, or can be ...


1

You can get non-slip rug pads that are made to keep rugs from sliding around on floors, and cover your entire floor with those wherever you want this carpet. But without nailing it down at the edges, there is no way to do it. I've done what you are planning in bedrooms before, but I didn't bother putting the carpet/rug under the bed or furniture; no point in ...


1

Try some 3M Extreme mounting tape http://amzn.to/2h7cIi6 If there is any leftover tape on the wall when you remove it, use some adhesive remover on it. The other option would be to attach some legs on the pipe so that it can be physically supported by the ground. Or wire/rope it to anything that protrudes from the brick wall.


1

1/8 aircraft cable looped around each pillar. turnbuckle for taughtness. super strong, easily removeable. all in cost less than $100


1

The weight of the roof will be so little in that area, that if you have a fascia board, that will hold it together in a straight line for the short time while you are adding the header. If you have aluminum wrapped fascia, you will most likely have 2X material for a sub fascia, that's even better, unless it is a cover over an existing 1X fascia. Even if it ...


1

Based on your description of the loading, I wouldn't be too concerned about supporting it at all unless you're going to leave the framing out for any significant period of time (days for example). If anything it might sag a fraction of an inch, but you'll true it up when the new header goes in. You'll want to remove the old one first and re-frame that ...


1

I wouldn't try to use drywall for this, plywood would be better, but it isn't available in 9' lengths. You could build panels out of 1x4s like fence panels. You could beef up and use barn door slides instead of closet slides. Another idea, a different way to go - if you made five 9'x4' panels, 2x4 framing with 1/4" plywood on one side, you could use lag ...


1

Could you support it up the same way you support a porch? You'd want to get past that sidewalk, the base has to be absolutely secure where it sets.


1

You can walk on HB as long as you like. If it is of the 1/2" variety I seriously doubt you could damage it. However it does emit silica dust. If you walked on it vigorously you could kick some up and it is really not a good thing to breathe or be near food. You can certainly paint it. There are waterproofing paints used for backer boards like redgard... ...


1

I have been using this weatherseal tape for a couple of years now: Frost King Weatherseal Tape. It does a good job of sealing around leaky window frames. Of course you have to pull it off in the spring (except on windows you don't need to open). Seems to be good at not pulling off paint (not perfect!). I prefer it to the shrink film, because I find that ...


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