New answers tagged

2

To answer your question, why did they make them 5 feet high: If you didn't specify the height they did whatever makes most of their customers happy. Most TVs are in my opinion mounted too high for ideal viewing angle and neck posture. Many are mounted above fire places, way too high ..... for ideal viewing angle and neck posture. But most people want ...


2

This may be a very simple fix. It turns out the similar problem I described was all due to low batteries in a Firestick remote. Apparently when the batteries get low in those, and possibly other types of IR remotes, it can send out spurious IR signals that get received by the appliances. Dumb design flaw in the remote. It should probably just have a ...


3

Here's some info which is applicable to the other answers that suggest using sheet metal screws. At least for steel studs, there is readily available engineering data that can be used to judge how well this will work. (TLDR: it should work fine). Background - steel studs are manufactured to standards. So it doesn't matter who made them, you can assume they'...


3

The steel "studs" are about 14ga galvanized steel - they're used because they're light, strong, and cheaper to handle (albeit you can't nail drywall to them, it must be screwed.) What I would do is use toggle bolts (image below) and sink them into the studs. The "wings" on the toggle do require a slightly larger hole (about the size of a ...


0

For googlers who chance upon this thread: for situations where you might have the option of, or just want not to poke holes in drywall, or want a moveable solution, etc., I have my big screen mount screwed into a couple of "tall enough" 2x4s that are spread apart enough so that the "long enough" mount screws penetrate them centerline. ...


-3

Don't. Drilling steel studs can start a fire. Plus you will have to undo your work when you move out. Get a "TV floor stand" made for a TV your size. They have them with wheels and without. Probably cost you $100 to $200. But that's less than the landlord would charge you if they found out you ripped open the wall and did construction. Don't skimp ...


3

I don't have experience in dealing with metal studs or installing TV-s so I cannot answer your question but others already offered good advice on those topics. You (OP), however, mentioned several times that this is not your property; you're renting. In a rental property I wouldn't attempt any of these steps suggested in the other answers to avoid any kind ...


14

Metal studs? Welcome to the world of the "self-drilling sheet metal screw" Image from "Albanycountyfasteners.com" never heard of them, not associated in any way. You don't need ones with a rubber washer, but this was the first image that wasn't impossible to copy - you can get them with various head types to match your wall mount ...


20

There's a few things in here so let's cover them one at a time Can I support a TV mount with only drywall? If we're talking a modern TV (i.e. a 2015+ 4k TV) then yes. I recently had my living room TV die and I bought a 65" 4k TV. It weighs perhaps 50 lbs, which is well within the tolerances of drywall using a flush-mount. I would buy either the best ...


6

Open up wall where you want to mount the TV, add some wood crossing, re-drywall, install your kit correctly. I would go so far as adding a full wood "box" so that you have an area parallel to the metal studs that can help support the crosses.


27

If the TV will be on a pivot arm the answer is absolutely not. If it will be tight to the wall, as you say, and generally nobody will be physically handling the TV (tilting or moving, e.g. to plug in game consoles or whatever) then it can be quite safe especially if you use several (4?) toggle bolts along the top edge of the bracket. You don't need them on ...


0

Chances are that the the USB power and the AUX output of your TV share the same 5V power rail. When you connect the LEDs, you either overwork the power supply or some power modulation from the LEDs makes it's way through the power rails into your audio output. One thing you could try to decouple the audio output by using a isolation transformer. Something ...


2

If the rotator has a separate power injector in addition to the controller, make sure that is unplugged also. If all power to the rotator is cut, and the antenna is still rotating on its own, there are 2 possibilities: The rotator motor or its gearing could have gone bad. Something could have broken from use over time or some extra strong wind that now ...


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