36

Nope! Plain Old Telephone Service (POTS) jacks were usually daisy chained as you describe. Ethernet requires a "home run" from each jack to a modem, router or switch. Also, it's probably cat-3 which is unsuitable for Ethernet. EDIT: Based on comments (which sometimes go away, but answers don't), I'm adding to my answer here: According to others ...


25

If you are removing it, remove it. It's only "short-sighted" if you have any conception that you might want a landline phone there. You MIGHT be able (depending on how snug it is, and how many layers of paint are on the cable making it fatter) to just stuff the (uncut) cable down the hole in the floor once you have it unstapled. But simply snipping ...


23

Gigabit Ethernet If you need Gigabit Ethernet (1000Base-T), you're out of luck and will have to run new wires with CAT 5e or better cabling. It's likely not that difficult depending on your house. It seems like these jacks are above each other in the same place on each floor. Thus, you could easily drop a cable down from the upper floor and run them all ...


20

There is a separate issue of the type of cable. Telephone can run on CAT 3 (10 Meg. ethernet), CAT 5 (100 Meg. ethernet), CAT 5e (1 Gig. ethernet) but also on much older types of cables that are not suitable for ethernet at all. Assuming that the cable you already have in place is at least Cat 5 (100 Meg., which is arguably enough for typical internet usage),...


15

Even if you never have a landline, you might want to use that wire again. I have repurposed old phone wiring for many things = thermostats, alarms, doorbells, etc. If you really don't like looking at it, you could clip it off just above the staple above the baseboard. If you ever need to re-use it, there's enough to work with. I would terminate the cable ...


11

Based on this image and quote, I'm about 99.95% sure that it's an old telephone line suppressor: Soon after telephone networks began to spring up across the countryside, the Bell Telephone Company realized that there was a danger to both the company's property, and the property of subscribers, from such perils as lightning strikes on the network, and ...


9

Each of the incoming pairs in the telco's 5-pair cable is for a separate analog telephone line (or, in today's world, a single DSL channel). The pairs are identified by color: there's a solid blue wire paired with a white wire with blue stripe (also called tracer); a solid orange wire paired with a white wire with orange stripe, and so on with green, brown, ...


7

You have a very good answer from @Ecnerwal, this answer just adds a couple additional considerations. The first: conduit. While you have the walls open, install conduit to the attic. This will give you better protection from interference if you use something metallic, and of course better mechanical protection, and better fire safety. Conduit gives you ...


7

Well, your pictures have twigged an occasional issue I run into where I can't see them, (likely not your fault) but flying blind.... From a functional point of view you really don't have to worry about separation. Twisted pair is actually quite good at ignoring noise, and 60 Hz noise is of little note to 100MHz ethernet anyway. You can do it all wrong and ...


7

It depends. If it was installed originally, it should be stapled, in which case you can't use it. If it was fished through the wall after the fact then yes you should be able to pull using it. I would recommend pulling polyline first and then pulling the new cable through, along with another piece of polyline. The cable will stretch and break if you ...


7

The cable type is almost certainly BT spec CW1308, 3 pairs would be normal for UK extension wiring. It won't be to Cat5 or better spec, but over a short run and without external interference you will probably get 10Mbits over it, maybe even 100Mbits.


7

If it's a reasonably modern twisted pair telephone cable, then it's equivalent to CAT3 Ethernet. For Ethernet, that's obsolete by today's standards. It's only good for 10Mbps, or maybe 100Mbps over short runs. By comparison, all the cables you can buy today are CAT5e (100Mbps to 1Gbps) or CAT6 (up to 10Gbps). What this means is that your Ethernet ...


7

Now you've changed the question significantly to describe a wire fed from underground. Except you still have a trunk running down the pole, so this is still a wire coming down off a pole. Again, you do not know what that wire is crossed up with. We see live voltage on CATV jackets all the time, not least due to lost neutrals at the other end of the cable. ...


6

Firstly, I don't know what your specific situation is, but it sounds like what you're trying to do might be illegal. You're potentially messing with people's emergency services (911 access) and Verizon might own the cable you're trying to mess with. But, I'll assume you've worked this out somehow, and take no responsibility for your actions. I used to work ...


6

Since all the telephone companies were deregulated, the practice is to have a demarcation point (which I'm really surprised no one else has mentioned yet). Most homes built within the last 20 years or so will have one, which will be a box or jack (often marked "DEMARC") marking the change in responsibility between their network and your in-house wiring. ...


6

As DMoores says, what you describe is called an intercom. However there are at least two relatively low-cost alternatives. Cordless Phones Panasonic and other companies sell cordless phones in sets of two, three, four or more handsets. One handset plugs into your phone socket, all the handsets can make or receive normal phone calls. In addition any ...


6

You need to connect to the center two wires in RJ-11. Since RJ-11 is usually 6 pins, these are pins 3 and 4. If yours has only 4 pins, these should be pins 2 and 3. Leave the other pins unconnected. Now, with regards to the colors (and correct polarity), this is country-dependent. Check this chart for reference. But, you can also try one way, and if it ...


6

I would just drill two holes into the tile and use plastic anchors to face mount it to the tiles. Raise it up slightly so the wires are in the recessed portion. I wouldn't think super glue would work well here. Silicone may work but may end up looking messy.


6

I'd say it's a six-conductor eight-pin RJ-type connector, which means it is not Ethernet. It's likely a (multi-line?) phone connection.


6

Cut it off at the floor level and push it down; out of sight, out of mind is applicable and safe in this situation. If you are sincere in regards to your question title: What's the right way of removing an indoor telephone line? then get in the crawl space and cut it back as far as you can.


6

If you can find the other end of the cable (where it connects to the line coming in from the road) and disconnect it before you cut through the cable, that might be a good idea. That way if the cut end of the cable is ever shorted for any reason, it wont render all the phone jacks in the house useless. You may not need the phone wiring for anything, but it ...


6

They plug right in If you wire the blue pair (4,5) for phone service (or the blue and green (3,6) pairs for fancy two-line phones.) No adapter is needed. I do it at work all the time (my employer's employer's employer uses 24 port Cat5e patch panels as voice patch with a 25 pair cat3 run to them. One pair to each jack and one spare pair. I don't know why ...


5

L1, L2 cross-references to TIP and RING respectively per standard US phone nomenclature. TX/TS can be wired as the second line TIP2/TX, RING2/TS or a sort of daisy chain, but in a single line system, can be ignored. Wiring on this will be Green => Tip => L1 Red => Ring => L2 This pair will connect to the center pair of contacts in the modular socket/jack. ...


5

Step 1: Bring your router to the demarc point and verify that it works there. You did not mention if you had done this, but if not, you should, as the whole point of a demarc is to say: "If it does not work here the provider needs to fix it. If it does work here the problem is in your wiring." So you need to test that. THEN you can start to concern yourself ...


5

Land-lines have been on their way out for years now. It may be prudent to keep at least one telephone jack working, but there's no requirement for a phone handset in every room of the house. I don't see any point keeping the jack. While it is theoretically possible to use telephone wires for Internet, basic telephone wire is terrible, and leaving it in a ...


5

You can't do that. Modern ethernet requires point to point connections, not bus topology. And it is quite likely that since your telephone was wired bus topology that the wire quality is inadequate to even try using the phone cable for even a single computer connection. Edit: Really for a 100% accurate answer to your options we need to know What kind of ...


5

If I can weigh in here. I have only used cat5 and up in my professional life, but we did do some hacks in a pinch. If you give more info (why you do it this way, photos of cables etc) I could be more help. If the cabling was done in a star configuration (all connected to a central point) then you are at least lucky in that regard. Firstly lets start with the ...


5

They do it because they can. It costs money to remove cables. If the municipality doesn't require them to do so, why would they? Most people don't notice or complain, and there's the off chance they'll use it again if the next owner wants service. I've gone so far as to cut them free of my home, neatly coil the cable, and wire it to the pole on the alley. ...


4

Typically the line from your provider is, or should be, terminated in a "customer interface" or "network interface device" which also usually have surge-suppression for the telephone line built-in - and those have large threaded studs or other screw connectors for the larger wires to connect to. I frankly find it odd that this would be missing, as it's ...


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