22

Gigabit Ethernet If you need Gigabit Ethernet (1000Base-T), you're out of luck and will have to run new wires with CAT 5e or better cabling. It's likely not that difficult depending on your house. It seems like these jacks are above each other in the same place on each floor. Thus, you could easily drop a cable down from the upper floor and run them all ...


14

Probably you have two or more phone jacks daisy-chained together. One cable goes to wherever the phone line enters the house and the other runs to another phone jack somewhere else in the house. This is a common practice. I did some pricing online, and it seems that Cat 5e is comparable in price to 4-conductor phone cable, so the builders may simply have ...


8

High and low voltage conductors in the same junction box must be separated by a barrier. Outdated NEC reference: 800-52(a)(1)c.1.Exception 1. In the typical dbl. gang box installation, power in one half and phone and data in the other, there needs to be a partition in the box separating the two classes of conductors.


7

Yes, indeed it is a Belgian phone socket. http://www.levoyageur.net/phone-country-Belgium.html The four pins match the four holes in your socket. The fifth pin is there to make sure you don't put it in upside down. There's a hole for it too. This is how it looks with a cover (except for the RJ jack that you may not have) https://web.archive.org/web/...


6

Since all the telephone companies were deregulated, the practice is to have a demarcation point (which I'm really surprised no one else has mentioned yet). Most homes built within the last 20 years or so will have one, which will be a box or jack (often marked "DEMARC") marking the change in responsibility between their network and your in-house wiring. ...


6

As DMoores says, what you describe is called an intercom. However there are at least two relatively low-cost alternatives. Cordless Phones Panasonic and other companies sell cordless phones in sets of two, three, four or more handsets. One handset plugs into your phone socket, all the handsets can make or receive normal phone calls. In addition any ...


6

This is one of the residential structured media cabinets that you can get at any of the big box stores, made by Leviton and several others (your pic is too low resolution for me to read the name on the phone block, there may also be a name on the cabinet door). You can buy additional blocks of all sorts of things to fit in these, such as network patches, ...


6

Firstly, I don't know what your specific situation is, but it sounds like what you're trying to do might be illegal. You're potentially messing with people's emergency services (911 access) and Verizon might own the cable you're trying to mess with. But, I'll assume you've worked this out somehow, and take no responsibility for your actions. I used to work ...


6

It depends. If it was installed originally, it should be stapled, in which case you can't use it. If it was fished through the wall after the fact then yes you should be able to pull using it. I would recommend pulling polyline first and then pulling the new cable through, along with another piece of polyline. The cable will stretch and break if you ...


6

Well, your pictures have twigged an occasional issue I run into where I can't see them, (likely not your fault) but flying blind.... From a functional point of view you really don't have to worry about separation. Twisted pair is actually quite good at ignoring noise, and 60 Hz noise is of little note to 100MHz ethernet anyway. You can do it all wrong and ...


6

You need to connect to the center two wires in RJ-11. Since RJ-11 is usually 6 pins, these are pins 3 and 4. If yours has only 4 pins, these should be pins 2 and 3. Leave the other pins unconnected. Now, with regards to the colors (and correct polarity), this is country-dependent. Check this chart for reference. But, you can also try one way, and if it ...


6

I would just drill two holes into the tile and use plastic anchors to face mount it to the tiles. Raise it up slightly so the wires are in the recessed portion. I wouldn't think super glue would work well here. Silicone may work but may end up looking messy.


6

The cable type is almost certainly BT spec CW1308, 3 pairs would be normal for UK extension wiring. It won't be to Cat5 or better spec, but over a short run and without external interference you will probably get 10Mbits over it, maybe even 100Mbits.


5

NEC 2008 800.133 Installation of Communications Wires, Cables, and Equipment. (A) Separation from Other Conductors. (1) In Raceways, Cable Trays, Boxes, and Cables. (c) Electric Light, Power, Class 1, Non–Power-Limited Fire Alarm, and Medium-Power Network-Powered Broadband Communications Circuits in Raceways, Compartments, and Boxes. ...


5

L1, L2 cross-references to TIP and RING respectively per standard US phone nomenclature. TX/TS can be wired as the second line TIP2/TX, RING2/TS or a sort of daisy chain, but in a single line system, can be ignored. Wiring on this will be Green => Tip => L1 Red => Ring => L2 This pair will connect to the center pair of contacts in the modular socket/jack. ...


5

You have a very good answer from @Ecnerwal, this answer just adds a couple additional considerations. The first: conduit. While you have the walls open, install conduit to the attic. This will give you better protection from interference if you use something metallic, and of course better mechanical protection, and better fire safety. Conduit gives you ...


5

Step 1: Bring your router to the demarc point and verify that it works there. You did not mention if you had done this, but if not, you should, as the whole point of a demarc is to say: "If it does not work here the provider needs to fix it. If it does work here the problem is in your wiring." So you need to test that. THEN you can start to concern yourself ...


4

Typically the line from your provider is, or should be, terminated in a "customer interface" or "network interface device" which also usually have surge-suppression for the telephone line built-in - and those have large threaded studs or other screw connectors for the larger wires to connect to. I frankly find it odd that this would be missing, as it's ...


4

Yes, you can pull out your existing telco punchdown block and replace it with a suitable block for Ethernet networking. What you're really looking for is a Cat 5e (or better), T-568A or T-568B compatible punchdown block with RJ45 jacks. That's TIA/EIA-568 revision B, which is essentially identical to the older AT&T 258A (Systimax) standard, which was ...


4

Traditionally in the US, residential POTS was daisy-chained via 4-wire copper cable with drops at junction boxes or sockets. Only 2 wires (red/green) were used, with 2 spares (yellow/black). All the phones were in parallel, which caused potential problems with inadequate ringer current from the central office. The easy solution was to disconnect the ringers ...


4

Plain Old Telephone Service (POTS) is very robust - almost any cabling type & topology will work. But here are my recommendations: Cable Type I recommend using 4-pair CAT 5e cable. If you have some CAT 5 or even CAT 3 lying around it will work 100% for voice, fax and DSL. But CAT 5e gives you the greatest flexibility to reuse the cabling in the future ...


4

I'm no pro, but I'd say you can do as you wish with low voltage cable I'd guess the daisy chaining was a poor mans way of propagating the phone cable without running it back to the closet. Yeah, see the last answer I'd remove the phone jacks and short out two of the pairs with clip leads. Then use a continuity tester to map out the cables. Does the grey one ...


4

Based on the description, it sounds like you (or a previous owner of the house) USED to have traditional phone service and do not have that any more. If you are still paying for phone service then you may want to look into porting the number to VOIP instead of simply turning off the phone service and using VOIP with a new number. Find the Network Interface ...


3

We're having to make assumptions here that this is house wiring for an single analog phone circuit (POTS) as no specifics other than "it's a phone extension" are given. This is a four wire cable with a green/red and white/brown circuit. POTS requires a pair of wires. Your house could be wired having up to two separate phone lines if this is the only wire ...


3

I’m not familiar with outlets in Belgium, but assuming they are typical European outlets, then it looks to be a high-voltage stove/oven or dryer electrical outlet (why it would be in the living room though is beyond me). The labels for the four connectors (a, b, S, ground) are curious, but presumably they are hot (a), hot (b), neutral (S), and ground: ...


3

First obvious problem- you haven't wired it correctly. You have proven connectivity works with the long Ethernet cable so the fact you are failing to get lights shows that you need to sort this. Also getting signal on all the wires shows something is connected somewhere. Could be a splice as Steven mentioned, or some other problem. Is it even cat-5 cable? ...


3

Telephone line voltage is nominally 48V DC (varies though, depending on your distance to the CO and what voltage they are set at), and ring voltage is nominally 90V AC at 20 Hz (as opposed to 60Hz mains power). You should be able to test these between the tip and ring (red/green, or center pair) wires on your phone line. When not ringing, you should measure ...


3

Many people can feel the 48V on a phone line pair. The big issue with 48V is that it is relatively safe and should not cause electrocution. There should be no direct electrical connection between the phone line and the power line. If there is you have a serious safety issue to get cleared up right away. The phone line itself operates as a current loop ...


3

Those are RJ45s not RJ11s. RJ11's only have 4 pins. An RJ11 fits into the center 4 pins of this jack though. Q1 Whether one is left or right I can't tell but the top is definitely for one jack and the bottom is for the other jack. Q2 leave your white on 5 and blue on 4 like all the diagrams below. You can use 568A and the orange pair for the second line ...


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