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19

You can't. The tempered glass will completely shatter if this is even attempted. If you absolutely must have tempered glass with a hole in it, the hole or any other shaping must be done before the tempering process.


16

Nobody uses a pneumatic nailer for drywall. And in a world where shortcuts are revered, that has to tell you something. You know this already, but screws are the gold standard. They stay put and they pull the drywall as close to framing as possible. Badly set screws can pop, but properly set ones don't. Nails were common in the past, but they were usually ...


14

I am a general contractor and I'm having a house redone right now after the electrician and plumber roughed in. I tape off the plumbing and stuff newspaper in the electric boxes and light fixture boxes. When the mudding is done and they do the finish, I'll go around and remove the newspaper and clean up the boxes. This takes about an hour total time and ...


13

You can go at it with a sledgehammer (or a smaller hand sledge) and a star drill, and then drive wedges into the holes (or if you are patient, fill the holes with water and let them freeze in the winter.) There are special wedges designed for use in round holes for splitting rock (feathers and wedges seems to find them). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


12

There is a lot to know. Shortest answer: you should let experts handle anything you're not sure of. You need to comply with local building codes (This also means you need to know what those are. Inspectors don't accept ignorance as an excuse.) The design needs to be approved by an architect or structural engineer. There are strict requirements on footings,...


11

"Why is this happening?" The drywall mud was applied too thick "what should I do about it?" Either apply additional thin coats (sanding between each), or scrape it down and start over, this time using several thinner applications and sanding between each


9

You cannot cut or drill heat tempered glass. Not waterjet, not laser, not hot needle, not under water. Physics, not technique. There is no secret formula for cutting or drilling tempered glass. You can do edge work if you are careful, but you are weakening the edge substantially in doing so. IF you don't remove too much glass it may not break. If you ...


8

There exist expanding compounds like this one: Ecobust, which are poured into predrilled holes and expand as they dry, splitting the stone (or concrete). It does require a power tool, unless there are already some cracks in your boulder, but a cordless hammer drill should be sufficient.


8

If it is a nice looking rock or has a particular shape, place it on Craig's list as a free item. I listed four 5" Blue Spruce trees I needed to remove to make way for a garage. Gone over the weekend and I didn't have to lift a hand.


6

One way is to take a long level (the longer the better : 6 and 8' levels work well). Hold one end of the level on the higher point, and then once the level is level, measure the gap between the other end and the floor using a measuring tape. This will give you your height over your run (length of level), for that particular spot in the floor anyways.


6

I just got an answer by email from the owner of a company in France that specializes in artisanal plaster work. He recognizes it as a very thin lime-plaster that was applied with a bundle of leaves like these: with a whipping motion. He calls this type of finish an enduit fouetté which translates as whipped lime-plaster. He suggests that we mix a very thin ...


5

There are precision screwdrivers available that have larger handles, such as this one from Home Depot: (source: homedepot.com) In general, you press down on the tip while you screw in or out: this helps to hold the screwdriver in the slots in the screw head and allows you to use more force to turn the screw.


5

Use a pair of pliers to grab the screwdriver, and while applying downward force to the screwdriver (so it doesn't slip and strip your screws), carefully apply pressure using the pliers.


4

I would countersink and then tap for two reasons. The first is the countersink bit could damage the first thread and make installing the bolt a problem. The second is there is less metal to tap and therefore easier and less wear on the tap. Happy Day!


4

If the hinges are on the same vertical line, then (as noted by @DA01) the hinge should stay wherever you leave it (absent wind, etc). If the hinges aren't vertically aligned, then the gate will want to swing towards a specific point. You can use this to solve your problem. Imagine that the gate is swinging on a rod, and can go 360° around the rod. If ...


4

This verges on "opinion based..." Brush width depends what you are working on - for wall corners, 2" is probably fine. On our last project, my assistant finally figured out that using an overly tiny brush on window muntins was slower, not faster or more precise, but for that job a 1/2-5/8" brush was "about right." I go for the long handled angled - how much ...


4

It's called terazzo: The basic process is: add your 'sparkle' substance as aggregate (glass is a typical option) pour concrete after concrete sets, you use a diamond grinder to expose the top layer of aggregate


4

Yes, you can. You can't exactly CUT a hole, but you can GRIND a hole, if you're gentle and patient. This feller demonstrates grinding tempered glass. About half-way down this page, "sammiesoo" claims to have sand-blasted and ground tempered glass before. This forum also discusses methods for grinding tempered automotive glass. So the answer is hardly "...


4

Without (electrical) power tools, or a sledgehammer: Here are 10 options besides a hammer or Fire-setting... mentioned in almost every post (but more specifically, for best results use at least 300 lbs of wood or 100 lbs of wood and 20 lbs of bbq briquettes; let it burn overnight and then (in the morning) dump 15-20 gallons of ice-cold water on it.) Option ...


3

Insulation is helpful even if it's not perfect. Ideally, you should cover the attic floor completely, without reducing airflow between any vents (soffit, ridge, gable, roof, whatever). Whether a specific area is important to insulate depends on your house, but as a rule, you should aim to insulate any walls/ceilings between living space and unconditioned ...


3

Wow, a 1/2 inch over 6 inches is quite the floor, sure it is not a roof?!?! lol. I have never heard of a standard expression for floor level. I would simply express it over the span of the entire floor or from the crown spot. Example, 1 inch over 12 feet across joists, or maybe 1/2 inch over 8 feet with joists. You are right saying that a long level can ...


3

Your thinset should be like peanut butter. If it is too thin then you could have possible issues with mosaics and flooring. Basically you could push down to bare floor or close to it. A 4mm trowel is perfect size for most mosaics. I think that your issue is that either you aren't combing the area well enough after dropping down your thinset or possibly ...


3

Most stucco/plaster patterns/textures aren't/weren't created by any particular tools but rather by incredibly highly skilled craftsmen. In other words, the pattern was created via decades of experience and skills rather than a particular tool. We have a stucco house and over the years I've talked to a few contractors and they all said the same thing...good ...


3

A wooden barrel has a 21"-24" diameter at the head. You can usually buy a half barrel at a good nursery/garden center. The advantage is that you can easily dismantle it after the concrete has cured by knocking the staves inward.


3

Drywall compound shrinks as it dries, so if applied thick or if it has too much water it will crack. A few cracks on the first coat are ok since later coats will fill the cracks. From the image it appears the first coat here is much thicker than needed. Excess mud on any layer will just mean more work and more sanding later. Ideally the first coat should ...


3

It's called 'spray foam insulation' Acetone (nail polish remover) will remove it - but it potentially will damage the surface that got contaminated. On an unrelated note - you should demand that the window company pay you for damages/cleaning.


2

There are rubber stopper borers. the cork ones have small serrations, and the rubber borers are just smooth and sharp. I cant tell from the picture, which you have, but I have had far better use using a drill press, an placing a rubber mat under the stopper. it will keep it from sliding around while you drill into it.


2

Styrofoam circles in the center then just knock the foam out when it sets up.


2

There's an excellent project starting up on kickstarter called the Global Village Construction Set which I read here. They are basically trying to open source hardware so that you can mix and match pieces to build construction machines. The wiki explains a lot of what they have already developed -- my favorite is the Compressed Earth Block Press which ...


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