19

You can't. The tempered glass will completely shatter if this is even attempted. If you absolutely must have tempered glass with a hole in it, the hole or any other shaping must be done before the tempering process.


16

Nobody uses a pneumatic nailer for drywall. And in a world where shortcuts are revered, that has to tell you something. You know this already, but screws are the gold standard. They stay put and they pull the drywall as close to framing as possible. Badly set screws can pop, but properly set ones don't. Nails were common in the past, but they were usually ...


14

I am a general contractor and I'm having a house redone right now after the electrician and plumber roughed in. I tape off the plumbing and stuff newspaper in the electric boxes and light fixture boxes. When the mudding is done and they do the finish, I'll go around and remove the newspaper and clean up the boxes. This takes about an hour total time and ...


13

You can go at it with a sledgehammer (or a smaller hand sledge) and a star drill, and then drive wedges into the holes (or if you are patient, fill the holes with water and let them freeze in the winter.) There are special wedges designed for use in round holes for splitting rock (feathers and wedges seems to find them). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


12

"Why is this happening?" The drywall mud was applied too thick "what should I do about it?" Either apply additional thin coats (sanding between each), or scrape it down and start over, this time using several thinner applications and sanding between each


9

There exist expanding compounds like this one: Ecobust, which are poured into predrilled holes and expand as they dry, splitting the stone (or concrete). It does require a power tool, unless there are already some cracks in your boulder, but a cordless hammer drill should be sufficient.


9

You cannot cut or drill heat tempered glass. Not waterjet, not laser, not hot needle, not under water. Physics, not technique. There is no secret formula for cutting or drilling tempered glass. You can do edge work if you are careful, but you are weakening the edge substantially in doing so. IF you don't remove too much glass it may not break. If you ...


8

If it is a nice looking rock or has a particular shape, place it on Craig's list as a free item. I listed four 5" Blue Spruce trees I needed to remove to make way for a garage. Gone over the weekend and I didn't have to lift a hand.


6

If the hinges are on the same vertical line, then (as noted by @DA01) the hinge should stay wherever you leave it (absent wind, etc). If the hinges aren't vertically aligned, then the gate will want to swing towards a specific point. You can use this to solve your problem. Imagine that the gate is swinging on a rod, and can go 360° around the rod. If ...


4

Without (electrical) power tools, or a sledgehammer: Here are 10 options besides a hammer or Fire-setting... mentioned in almost every post (but more specifically, for best results use at least 300 lbs of wood or 100 lbs of wood and 20 lbs of bbq briquettes; let it burn overnight and then (in the morning) dump 15-20 gallons of ice-cold water on it.) Option ...


4

I would countersink and then tap for two reasons. The first is the countersink bit could damage the first thread and make installing the bolt a problem. The second is there is less metal to tap and therefore easier and less wear on the tap. Happy Day!


4

Yes, you can. You can't exactly CUT a hole, but you can GRIND a hole, if you're gentle and patient. This feller demonstrates grinding tempered glass. About half-way down this page, "sammiesoo" claims to have sand-blasted and ground tempered glass before. This forum also discusses methods for grinding tempered automotive glass. So the answer is hardly "...


4

This verges on "opinion based..." Brush width depends what you are working on - for wall corners, 2" is probably fine. On our last project, my assistant finally figured out that using an overly tiny brush on window muntins was slower, not faster or more precise, but for that job a 1/2-5/8" brush was "about right." I go for the long handled angled - how much ...


4

It's called terazzo: The basic process is: add your 'sparkle' substance as aggregate (glass is a typical option) pour concrete after concrete sets, you use a diamond grinder to expose the top layer of aggregate


3

Your thinset should be like peanut butter. If it is too thin then you could have possible issues with mosaics and flooring. Basically you could push down to bare floor or close to it. A 4mm trowel is perfect size for most mosaics. I think that your issue is that either you aren't combing the area well enough after dropping down your thinset or possibly ...


3

Drywall compound shrinks as it dries, so if applied thick or if it has too much water it will crack. A few cracks on the first coat are ok since later coats will fill the cracks. From the image it appears the first coat here is much thicker than needed. Excess mud on any layer will just mean more work and more sanding later. Ideally the first coat should ...


3

It's called 'spray foam insulation' Acetone (nail polish remover) will remove it - but it potentially will damage the surface that got contaminated. On an unrelated note - you should demand that the window company pay you for damages/cleaning.


2

There are rubber stopper borers. the cork ones have small serrations, and the rubber borers are just smooth and sharp. I cant tell from the picture, which you have, but I have had far better use using a drill press, an placing a rubber mat under the stopper. it will keep it from sliding around while you drill into it.


2

Styrofoam circles in the center then just knock the foam out when it sets up.


2

Those instructions aren't very clear! I read step #7 this way: 7: Cut notches in the seat posts. Here's hints on how to do it: a) Don't assume both braces are the same size. b) Use the seat brace itself to mark the area to be cut out. c) After you've marked it, start the notch by making a cut with a circular saw. d) Now that you have a nice cut,...


2

If you have a grout float a nice flat one that will work for pushing down Mosaic tiles into the thinset it because it's nice and flat and it'll leave your mosaics flat after you push down plus you can control much easier the amount of force you use to push down on them


2

If you are doing a lot of carpet/flooring work, get yourself a hooked flooring/carpet knife (any hardware store will have them). They have a large hooked blade and a good solid handle. Remember to keep body parts out of the "line of fire". #1 workplace injury: utility knife vs. body part.


2

Take a 2x4 or other long straight edge, and stand on it to compress the pad and stabilize it, then use your utility knife to cut it.


2

Use an awl and punch it to center mark your location (so the drill bit doesn't walk). Drill a small pilot hole (to insure correct placement of the hole). Enlarge the hole to the tap's specification. Countersink (without the hole as a guide you run the risk of the countersink going off center). Tap (run it through again if you had to readjust the countersink ...


2

Depending on what is behind your backer you need long roofing nails. I use HB 30-40 times a year and and I use the HB screws and long roofing nails. For shower walls that are a little tough I will double predrill for my backer screws. I will use a small bit for the hole then I will through each hole and use a larger bit. The larger bit I just give a tap ...


2

Use a crowbar and put another rock under it so that sections of it are unsupported. Now whack it with the sledgehammer a few times. If you get lucky, it will have a crack in it and you can break it into pieces. Otherwise you can knock off sections from the end. Worst case, use the plug and feathers approach described above. Another technique is to make ...


2

It's all in the aggregate. There are a lot of options depending on the look you're going for. Abalone shell is popular, and monochromatic glass chips could work well too. What you do is add a lot of these aggregates to your concrete mix (appropriately colored, and including performance-enhancing additives such as metakaolin or ground granulated blast furnace ...


2

Most work I've seen like this where it needs to be precise employs 2 techniques. The first of which is a welding Jig, complete with braces, clamps and the like to forcefully hold everything in position. Most of the time this uses a large, heavy welding tables with holes and slots to bolt the braces and jig too. C-Clamps and whatnot are helpful as well. ...


1

I'm going to go with the first comment and say that it's not possible. Tempered glass can not be cut, scored or sandblasted. Doing so will result in the glass shattering. Laminate glass can be cut, tempered can not.


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