33

High tooth count will give smooth results in most cases, but they can heat up in hard wood. More teeth leads to more friction. It's probably a fine all purpose blade, but ripping a hardwood like oak, especially very thick boards, is probably a reason to use a dedicated ripping blade. Ripping blades have 24-30 teeth, and the tooth profile is flat on top. ...


21

Check that your rip fence is parallel to the blade. If not, you could be forcing the workpiece into the blade as you feed.


12

Rip cutting a length of hardwood like oak is a much tougher job than cross cutting and you're trying to cut through a very thick piece. Note this is dangerous on a table saw, and especially if there's high feed resistance. Do not push harder to feed faster hoping to avoid the burn marks! Instead, you have to avoid the situation that is overworking your ...


8

Either the blade is slipping on the arbor or the belt is slipping on a pulley. If the former, tighten it. If the latter, tighten it.


8

Examine the blade disk to see if it has become gummy or coated with resin. You may have to remove the blade and scrub it clean. If the saw is not new the blade may be quite worn and need replacement. The teeth of a saw are bent slightly to the side (usually every other tooth to each side) to make the cut wider than the saw blade. Sometimes a saw blade ...


7

The piece you have may have started life as the piece you just purchased and was ripped down to its current width. The best tool for this is a table saw. It would be very difficult to do it any other way. many home improvement stores will cut down wood to custom lengths and widths. They may be able to cut it down for you in the store if you do not have ...


6

The technique I've used most often is called "scribing". The word simply means "writing" or "tracing", but here's how it goes. Set your board to be fitted in place. I typically tilt it so that I have roughly the same gap at each end if the high spot is in the middle. Otherwise, align the top as you'd like it to ultimately be. Lay a pencil on the surface ...


6

Rip it using a table saw. Set the width from the fence to the blade using your current piece. This will get you the width you need. When you rip it, be careful to only move the piece forward into the cut. You'll have a tendency to move it sideways slightly due to the length. If you have someone to support it coming out the other side, this would work best, ...


6

1) Cut a sheet of plywood so that all 4 legs fit on it. 2) Mount the wheels to the plywood. 3) Set the saw on top of the plywood. 4) Fasten the legs to the plywood so the saw won't fall off. I suggest some "L" brackets and screws through the legs but other means could be devised.


6

Just putting two casters (or four) on the table seems like a bad idea. The table will be lopsided and even if you raise the other two legs, the table will still have a tendency to move when you're cutting large pieces. If you're dead set on adding wheels, install four with locking features on a board and then secure the table to the board.


6

There could be several issues that cause the blade other than a dull blade, you have hit on squeezing the blade with the rip fence and chip board will get chewed up a little even with some squeeze, since it’s not that a loose belt is another possibility and the last thing I have seen a few times is the pulley on the motor shaft or the saw arbor is loose, ...


5

You could see if it can be repaired by a local motor shop. They are not inexpensive though. You can look on Craigslist for any electric motor with the same specs as yours, the most important being HP, RPM, voltage and frame type. Northern Equipment does offer a replacement that matches your motor specs for $300. Verify that the smoke was not just the drive ...


5

You have a "reversible" fence. One set of measurements are for when the fence is on the right side of the blade, and the other set of measurements are for when the fence is on the left side of the blade. Remove those 2 red knobs on the right side of the fence and remove the bolts/fence. Now put the bolts through the other side (where the red knobs are) ...


5

Loose teeth on a modern table saw blade are indeed a thing to be concerned about. It would be anybody's guess as to where the loose tooth would fly if it came off the blade. As many readers here may know the most popular blades in use today are the type with carbide tips bonded to the tooth cutouts on a blade core. It is possible that there is a history of ...


5

What is the horse power of the motor? What is the rating of the circuit breaker? Are you running on an extension cord? Circuit breakers can take some time to trip if the overload is small. As the motor slows, it draws more current. If a saw has been moved, it may no longer be in alignment. Using a vernier caliper check that the blade is parallel to the ...


4

For short lengths, (a few metres) I'd make a line with a pencil, clamp the molding to the edge of a table, use a cheap rip-cut saw (<£10) to cut outside the line then use a hand plane(~£20 2nd hand) to flatten the cut edge to the line. If you don't fancy a proper plane, buy a cheap yellow plastic Stanley surform (the longer one). It'll be fine for edges ...


4

What you are looking to do is create a "compound miter" cut down the sides of each board. When someone mentions compound miters, they are typically trying to install crown moulding. The moulding sits at an angle between the wall and the ceiling and also meets itself at an angle on in corners. You want the same thing, but with vastly different angles. If ...


4

In theory it's not a serious issue. The tooth of a table saw blade travels at a linear speed around 146 feet/second, so if a tooth suddenly came loose you'd be faced with a tiny piece of metal travelling just under 100 mph. In reality the most likely result is it breaks and lodges in the wood when entering the kerf, or exits the kerf and travels straight ...


4

Attach two fairly large wheels near the bottom of two adjacent legs, but on the side of the leg. The wheel should almost be touching the ground (1/8" or 1/16"). When you want to move it, you simply tilt it towards the wheels until they touch and the weight is transferred. You can then roll it. Conceptually, it is like a dolly. This might require additional ...


3

you have the wrong blade. 24tooth ripping blade is what you want. please have someone with experience show you how to use the digit cut off tool. I say this because the RED FLAG that popped up when you stated "it takes some pushing to get through". That's a no no, let the blade do the work and you should never have to force lumber to cut it. fyi fingers n ...


3

It's probably more economical to replace blades than sharpen them in your case. Sending blades out to be sharpened makes more sense for higher cost blades. Forrest's, for example, start around $100 so paying $30 to have them sharpened is quite a big savings over replacement. High quality melamine blades and stacked dados are even further into nosebleed ...


3

My son had a Craftsman 10” saw that the shiv or pulley connection to the shaft was loose. It would spin up but was noisy and when he tried to cut the blade stopped. I checked it out and the set screw had backed off a bit and it did damage the shaft because he had tightened the belt and it worked for a while before he called. I tightened the set screw on the ...


2

This is based entirely on inference and testing with some mockups (basically a paper table saw and fence measurement I made). I am not a woodworker but I found this question interesting. My guess: It's used to measure cuts for items wider than the table surface. Your saw is 31 cm across, and you need to cut a sheet of plywood from 60 cm down to 55 cm. ...


2

For future readers, Aluminum ( and copper, tin etc) can be cut with common carbide-tipped blades without any issues, and it's much easier than an abrasive blade. Clamp the metal, put a bit of wax on the blade, cut slowly. The noise made cutting 2 inch aluminum pipe with a radial arm saw is most impressive - the pipe works as a resonator. If you do use an ...


2

At this point I would take it apart. It's already broke you have nothing to lose. I had an older Delta saw that had a gearbox fail. The parts were more than I paid for the saw. It may not be a total loss though. Some of the older models had a router mount cast into the table. It was useless as a saw but made a dandy router table.


2

A Minimum 10" circular saw or table saw are the best options either would be $500 w/ the table saw being the best option. A band saw could also work.


2

The rear rail is shorter because the rear clamp of the fence does not need as much side to side space as the near side of the fence. Here is a picture of a typical table saw fence: Notice how the near side has the widest part of the assembly. The measurement scale on the front rail is lined up so that the index arrow on the front side of the fence shows ...


2

Just my opinion: circular saw first (and build/buy yourself a guide fence for super-straight cuts); cordless jigsaw for rough parking lot work (can be a relatively low-end/cheap unit); tablesaw eventually. There are cordless circular saws on the market now that are pretty darn powerful (look for anything 'brushless'), but they are stupid pricey and if you ...


2

First call tech line about the situation with Dewalt. Also look for overload reset button. That motor should be protected from just such situations.


2

At work we cut aluminium with a drop saw. An sometimes our table saw. We have a drop saw set up just for aluminium, with a fine tooth blade. It don't really do any damage to it as long as you cut slow. aluminium is softer then some of the timber we cut. So anyway if your trying to cut neat cuts use drop saw. An shouldn't do damage. If you are worried use ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible